* Make Them Visible

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posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 07:37 AM
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Perhaps some may feel this topic does not belong in this forum, but I do. In my opinion, this is a problem we choose daily to ignore, yet it is growing exponentially whether we acknowledge it or not. Perhaps we choose not to see it because it scares us. Truth is, it could be anyone we know. It could be any one of us.


Would you recognize your own mother if you passed her on the street?
Have The Homeless Become Invisible?
I expect many will balk at this video. After all this was just a controlled experiment and if their family members truly were so destitute they would know. Point is, those dirty faces you pass by on the street,the ones with the eyes that scan the crowd for any kind of acknowledgement that they are still seen, recognized as human beings,are just as much a part of society as you are.They have hopes, dreams, fears, families, lives before the street, friends. They should not be invisible.Even those who have mental issues, and drug addictions, do you ever wonder what drove them to be that way? What horrors they must have endured in their life that drove them to that point? I won't post any unrealistic expectation for everyone to drop everything and go out and save lost souls. Just asking for a bit of recognition. A bit of compassion which is sorely lacking in this world and I fear fading into obscurity. Whether you sympathize with the homeless or not (and I know many do not), you cannot deny that potentially you or someone you know could be the next pile of clothing and blankets you pass on the street that you scan over like the trash bins they lean beside or the doorways they huddle in. When you stop seeing other people, just because they don't meet your standards, you cease to be human IMHO. Let the flaming begin.




posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 08:35 AM
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No flaming here... I've been there...

We have given a lot in the form of clothes and money to our local homeless vet (Steve). It's hard to say whether he appreciates it anymore as his mind is fading fast, but he's part of our neighborhood and we all help him out.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: AccessDenied
Let the flaming begin.

I don't think there is anything in your post that deserves a 'flaming'.
It was well written and compassionate. A good reminder.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 08:44 AM
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APPLAUSE!

Can I be your friend? Thank you for posting this. I can think of several of my family members who would take no notice - would not even look to recognize it was me or one of my kids. Thank God that today is not a day I'll have to find out.

Nice find.
Make them visible is right. Rather than just the now empty "bank-owned" homes all over the place. Sickening.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 08:50 AM
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Good thread but we have to look at reality also.

Yes, they could be given homes but they don't have the means or desire to maintain them properly.

85% are homeless because they want to be. Not everyone wants to be like you/us?!.

I have a college frat bro who is living large in the Miami area-being homeless. He left his wife and two kids in PA and never went back..... go figure. (he is missing most of his teeth though-from the last pic I got of him).



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 08:50 AM
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Tack on the growing trend of cities trying to criminalize homelessness. This is a problem that is growing out of control and is only going to get worse as the wages remain largely flat and inflation continues to raise pricing people out of being able to maintain a living.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 08:51 AM
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originally posted by: anon72
85% are homeless because they want to be.


Oh, Lord! How unfortunate that you didn't provide a source for this number... :eyeroll:



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: anon72
I think there should be stone structures with rooms and beds in them. That way, the homeless can stay there and they can't destroy it. The gov should pay for cleaning services. Put information like books and pamphlets about bettering yourself in there. Maybe have a counselor go there a few times a week and help them.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

Sorry, on break I ran down to the alley where they hang out and I took a sampling.

Now, granted the weather is a little better today than last week, thus making the numbers a little higher.

I'm going back after happy hour later today and see if I get the same results.

And, the pic above of the video shows it even more so. Okay, I understand you are homeless but do you have to be lazy as well?

Get up and do something. A body in motion tends to stay in motion.
edit on 4/25/2014 by anon72 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: AccessDenied

I'm not going to flame you for that. There are homeless near where I live which is new , some of them are even living out in the woods and marshland out beyond the city limits and that's dangerous as hell. I feel really sorry for them, there are entire families out on the streets and the "solution" seems to be to have the police "convince" them to go somewhere else so they become someone else's problem. It used to be just alcoholics and drug addicts you'd see out there but it changed a few years ago, things aren't anywhere near as good as we're being told in the MSM and homelessness is the 800 pound gorilla in the room.

It's really disturbing that some communities are trying to fix the problem by "relocation" which doesn't address the cause of the problem and the people who could actually do some good (Congress) are trying to convince us that they deserve a raise instead of acknowledging that things aren't as peachy as we're being told. It's just unbelievable what's going on right now.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:15 AM
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Thanks for the replies. Some of us have been there,some have given a hand up to those in need. Many are one lost pay cheque,one missed mortgage payment away from being the same. I realize to that some do not view homelessness as I do,and you are certainly entitled to your opinion. There are many circumstances that lead to life on the street,and I don't view anyone who leads this way of living as lazy. Scrounging daily and fighting off others for basic needs we take for granted is not an easy way to live. It's true a small percentage choose this for whatever their own personal reasons are. Many have mental illness and drug addictions that imho should be taken care of by government programs. It makes no sense to me to criminalize being homeless and even arrest those who try to help,because it does nothing to fix the issue.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:20 AM
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a reply to: AccessDenied

Do you really thing "government programs" are the answer, going to help these people much?

I bet many of them have experience the "gov'ts help" and would prefer not to have their aide.

I would think church and community groups administering the Gov't money that is provided etc.

And, the recepients must work-doing something. Even if it a broom-- Starting building confidence in yourself is the best thing we can do for them, over all.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic
No flaming here... I've been there...

We have given a lot in the form of clothes and money to our local homeless vet (Steve). It's hard to say whether he appreciates it anymore as his mind is fading fast, but he's part of our neighborhood and we all help him out.

There are so many homeless vets and it is sad. I am glad to hear your story.


A year ago, when I was attending my step-daughter's high school graduation, I was lucky enough to see a man graduate along with her that was a veteran. He left high school to go to Vietnam during the war. He never graduated then and was awarded his diploma last year. He went through the ceremony and received a standing ovation. I friended the guy on Facebook that day.

He and his wife (she is also a veteran) are constantly working for homeless vets in the area. They collect food, clothing and toiletries and take them down to the river (where there is an encampment of homeless, many are veterans) and help these people.

No one sees these poor souls down there by the river, they are out of sight and out of mind for many people.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:47 AM
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a reply to: AccessDenied

Awesome video. Most Americans are only one illness away from being homeless so it's very possible to have seen your cousin a month ago and then see them homeless today.

I thought it was interesting that the older people's reaction to their videos of themselves walking by their relatives were very thoughtful and sad while the younger people were simply shocked like it was some sort of cool Ashton Kutcher punking.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:51 AM
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a reply to: anon72

Yes I do. Until they are in a position to help themselves. Either that or the government provides a place to house them. If they can find the funds to house murderers and rapists,it shouldn't be that difficult. They complain about homeless issues,but I have yet to see any politician put forth a logical plan to fix it. Thank heaven for church groups whom do something out of the goodness of their hearts despite what the hiarchy of society thinks.
edit on 25-4-2014 by AccessDenied because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

This is the demographic that disturbs me most of all. I cannot imagine what plays over in their minds when they see young men go off to war now. They certainly have earned the right to be treated as pillars of society,not cast offs.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:57 AM
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I for one would recognize a friend or family member, though my family and friends would never let that happen to each other. I donate to the homeless. It is especially difficult for the homeless who live in colder climates. Many shelters are filled to capacity. It is a shame that there are so many poor people suffering.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: AccessDenied

This is a subject quite close to my heart.

I can't tell you the frustration and deep sadness I often feel towards some peoples attitudes towards the homeless.

Several years ago a family member of mine lived on the streets for many years. I would go in to town a couple of times a week and see him in a shop doorway....with dirty clothes, holes in his shoes, painful blisters on his feet and fungal infections. He would beg for money. Most of the time he would sleep in squats or dis-used old mill buildings because he would get kicked out of the homeless shelters or hostels because of his drug addiction.

It used to crush me to see him in such condition and to watch the attitudes of passers by. Some choosing to simply ignore him too scared or uncomfortable to give him eye contact and those choosing to sneer at him with abusive comments.

I wanted to help him. We tried many times to get him help for his drugs problem. He also has mental health problems and if he wasn't living on the streets he was in prison or a hospital institution. A few times I opened my doors to let him live with me but as I have children to think about he would repeatedly start using drugs again and I had to put my children's safety first.

Every time he was let out of prison or hospital he had next to no support and help and he just went back to the people and places he knew and very soon went back to the drugs.Outside of institutions it was the only thing he knew. A huge problem for him was that as a child he ended up in "care" after an abusive family life. All he as known after that is prisons, hospitals and living on the streets. I think he just at some point became institutionalised. Outside of some form of institutional living he is incapable of the responsibilities and decision making that comes from "normal" living. I say this because he wasn't homeless living on the streets through lack of opportunity of somewhere to live...he just couldn't handle the responsibility.

Many times I have heard people say of him and others like him that he needs to man up and take responsibility for his own choices and his life. I have heard people say " well I had an abusive childhood and I managed to drag myself up and make something of myself and my life" and I totally respect people who can say that. But what of those who for whatever reason are not able to do this? Whether it be because of mental illness, or simply just because they are weaker in character. Are people less deserving of our compassion because of mental illness or personality flaws or weakness of character?

He has been in hospital the last few years. I wish I could be positive and say that when and if he is released he would be able to turn his life around. I honestly don't know what kind of life he will ever have and it still pains me now


I have worked with the homeless and all I know is.....that life isn't black and white, behind every homeless person is a complex story and chain of events.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
Tack on the growing trend of cities trying to criminalize homelessness. This is a problem that is growing out of control and is only going to get worse as the wages remain largely flat and inflation continues to raise pricing people out of being able to maintain a living.


Everyone knows poor people are too stupid and lazy to deserve luxuries like a home and food. They have a low or no skill job, which means the company is doing them a favor by letting them work there. The company is there to make money, workers are there because work is so much more fun than being at home.

My Lord, where do you people get your ideas from?



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 10:11 AM
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originally posted by: anon72



85% are homeless because they want to be. Not everyone wants to be like you/us?!.





So 85% of the homeless want to be homeless? If you discount the jobless who haven't been able to find work for years in this great economy, who have no family or friends they can count on for support, the mentally ill who've fallen through the cracks because of our excellent heathcare system and the Vets who have completed 3 tours of duty with PTD and our country shows appreciation by cutting their benefits, I really don't know how you arrived at that number. Pleaase provide a source.





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