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The Cymry or the true history of Britain.

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posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 02:05 PM
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I was once told perpetual chanting was carried out at Llantwit Major.
There is also this...
treasure1.tripod.com...
Skip to 5 minutes 30 in the video.




posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi
a reply to: urbanghost

Thank you. I have looked it up from the Museum's website and here it is... ancient mace-head

It is amazing that someone made such an artefact with the tools at hand.

On topic though, the various migrations - or rather the theories - are well documented and widely agreed by historians and experts. In a world that was fluid with migrations and invasions it would be difficult to isolate Wales as somehow sacrosanct.

Regards

Yes that mace head is something special, the hours that must have gone into making it.
I don't dispute that there were migrations, just that they were not as wide spreading as once thought. Take the beaker people. It was once thought that they came to this country in great numbers with their pottery. Now the consensus is that they never even existed, rather the designs came from people trading between different countries.
There was an excellent find in wales called Brymbo Man. He was buried with a beaker pot and he is now thought to be native rather than an migrant as was originally thought. History hasn't been adapted to take this into account, most of it still says that they came here. This makes a big difference to archeological finds of this kind.
This capeis pretty spectacular as well.
edit on 29-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 02:33 PM
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a reply to: Kester
Funnily enough I was reading the Brut y Tywysogion last night and that mentions many eclipses, comets and meteors that are historically accurate, they even give the year. It doesn't start until 680AD so doesn't have this one.
I will watch the video and see if there is anything else in older manuscripts about it.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: urbanghost
I don't dispute that there were migrations, just that they were not as wide spreading as once thought. Take the beaker people. It was once thought that they came to this country in great numbers with their pottery. Now the consensus is that they never even existed, rather the designs came from people trading between different countries.
There was an excellent find in wales called Brymbo Man. He was buried with a beaker pot and he is now thought to be native rather than an migrant as was originally thought. History hasn't been adapted to take this into account, most of it still says that they came here. This makes a big difference to archeological finds of this kind.


I don't think there is a consensus that the Beaker People never existed. There is a lack of evidence to provide a clear picture of their impact. They clearly did exist and their pottery and/or influence is spread over Europe and (primarily) Southern / South West England when considering the British Isels

With Brymbo Man, you cannot say what he was, in the sense that migrations happen gradually and migrants become locals and locals adopt imported customs. Therefore, Brymbo Man - regardless of what people think he was - demonstrates intermingling of people and customs in Wales and this diminishes the view that Wales is separate from everyone else. Surely that's the logic.

Regards



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: Kester
I was enjoying that video, then it mentioned the Coelbren Alphabet. Invented by Iolo Morganwg in the 18th century.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

But if the marble is there it must mean something.

Don't start me on the hooded monk. Freaked me right out that did. Said to be a thought form created by monks and still hanging around to scare young hitchhikers and cause tired drivers to lose control.
edit on 29 4 2014 by Kester because: haunting



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: paraphi



There is a lack of evidence to provide a clear picture of their impact.

A lack of evidence is the same as no evidence, its what archaeologists say when they don't understand something. Usually to support their pet theories. Theres a lack of evidence to say the celts came here it doesn't stop them coming up with theories. They are just theories, everyone has one.
Lack of evidence, not fully understood, thought to be, its ritual, ina different context, there are many more little sayings they churn out when they are clueless. Why don't they just say they don't know?



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:14 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: urbanghost

But if the marble is there it must mean something.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying what they say in the video is not true. Just they could have used a better bit of evidence than a carving made by a forger in the 18th century.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

You're in the right place to deny ignorance.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: Kester
There is another alphabet from Wales that is older. It was supposed to have been invented by Nennius about 800AD.
The story goes that Nennius was challenged by a Saxon about the Welsh not having an alphabet. So Nennius thought up a whole alphabet immediately just to prove him wrong.



edit on 29-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:28 PM
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originally posted by: urbanghost
A lack of evidence is the same as no evidence, its what archaeologists say when they don't understand something.


No, a lack of evidence is just that. The fact that Beaker artefacts have been found indicates that they were around. The lack of evidence can be applied both ways e.g. with Brymbo Man. The fact is that no one knows what he was. He could have been:

1. A native practicing Beaker customs
2. A Beaker
3. A native integrated into Beaker community, therefore a Beaker
4. A native who just coincidently was buried in the Beaker way
5. Any possible combination you choose

In archaeology, a lack of evidence is just a lack of evidence. You can fill in the blanks. However, the mainstream consensus settles on the most plausible explanation.

For example. You could say that Neolithic man had an advanced written language using paper. The fact that there is no evidence makes your position impossible to disprove. However, it is just not plausible that this is the case, so the mainstream consensus is that Neolithic man did not have an advanced written language on paper.

Regards
edit on 29/4/2014 by paraphi because: type



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:35 PM
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a reply to: paraphi



The fact that Beaker artefacts have been found indicates that they were around.

A beaker doesn't prove a whole race of people came to Britain on mass.



However, the mainstream consensus settles on the most plausible explanation.

So its not plausible that the beakers came here from trading, even though trading was a big part of life then and the native peoples were making pots for a long time before, but it is plausible that they came here because they found some beakers here? So the theory with the least amount of evidence is the most plausible?
You can fill in the gaps but if there is nothing to fill in it means nothing.
This is a quote from the Brymbo Man page.


Archaeologists now think that it was ideas that travelled not invading armies. People heard about making beakers and decided to make their own. People did move around for instance to trade and fighting did occur. We do not have enough evidence to say the Beaker Folk were a separate invading force. Moreover, we have not found enough skulls from the Early Bronze Age to divide people up into groups



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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originally posted by: urbanghost
a reply to: beansidhe


On a side note and purely out of curiosity, why do you think that Iolo Morganwg was a forger? I've read that he was and read that he wasn't, and to be honest I'm confused.

As promised here is an example of Iolo Morganwg trickery. Take the Barrdas for example, Iolo tried to say that it was authentic Welsh druidic theology. He basically made it all up...
So bit of a naughty boy was old Iolo Morganwg. He fooled a lot of "scholars" of the time and helped in the mistranslation of quite a lot of Welsh legends.


You see, I'm not so sure he made everything up. Because whilst looking into the Pictish stones, he came up. From the Barddas:




Why is it not right that a man should commit the Name of God to vocalization, and the sound of language and tongue?
Because it cannot be done without misnaming God, for [p.20 p.21] no man ever heard the vocalization of His Name, and no one knows how to pronounce it; but it is represented by letters, that it may be known what is meant, and for Whom it stands. Formerly signs were employed, namely, the three elements of vocal letters. However, to prevent disrespect and dishonour to God, a Bard is forbidden to name Him, except inwardly and in thought.
Pray, my beloved and discreet teacher, show me the signs that stand for the Name of God, and the manner in which they are made.
Thus are they made;―the first of the signs is a small cutting or line inclining with the sun at eventide, thus, / the second is another cutting, in the form of a perpendicular, upright post, thus, I and the third is a cutting of the same amount of inclination as the first, but in an opposite direction, that is, against the sun, thus and the three placed together, thus, \ But instead of, and as substitutes for these, are placed the three letters O I W.



The Barddas

Iolo Morganwg describes the Druids as using this symbol /I\ as the symbol for God.
Look what we found on a stone (LHS):



So either it's a coincidence, or someone having read his work decided to embellish his hoax, or not everything he wrote was false?



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: Kester


I was once told perpetual chanting was carried out at Llantwit Major.


One of the Three Perpetual Choirs of Britain. LLantwit Major, Glastonbury and Amesbury. Said to consist of 2,400 druids or monks who chanted on a rota. 100 at a time, every hour of the day and night, so as to maintain the enchantment of Britain.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:48 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Smart guy.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe
The Awen was invented by Iolo Morganwg. The actual word, which is Welsh, means “inspiration” or “essence.” It comes from the Breton symbol called the Tribann.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

And now they've been replaced by the mainstream media....



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:54 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: urbanghost

And now they've been replaced by the mainstream media....



edit on 29-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: paraphi
Regarding the beaker pottery, the beaker culture was between 2800 – 1800 BC. There was a find in Wales which is the only piece of artwork found in Britain that comes from the end of the last ice age.
Decorated Horse Jaw
The patterns on it are exactly the same as on beaker pottery. So its not like they had to copy it from anyone.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe



You see, I'm not so sure he made everything up. Because whilst looking into the Pictish stones, he came up. From the Barddas:

Why is it not right that a man should commit the Name of God to vocalization, and the sound of language and tongue?
Because it cannot be done without misnaming God, for [p.20 p.21] no man ever heard the vocalization of His Name, and no one knows how to pronounce it; but it is represented by letters, that it may be known what is meant, and for Whom it stands


This is similar to the jewish faith, Jews customarily do not pronounce any of God's many Names except in prayer or study. rabbis said that a person who says YHVH instead of using a substitute has no place in the World to Come, and should be put to death. The usual Orthodox practice is to substitute letters or syllables instead.
edit on 29-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



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