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The Cymry or the true history of Britain.

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posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost



This one's lovely!



Rainbows
Jane




posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel
Cath fynydd used to mean leopard a few hundred years ago, maybe that?



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost
No, that just means mountain cat. Leopard is llewpard.
Rainbows
Jane



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel
They are amazing instruments, I have one that was given to me by a friend, he plays it a lot better than I can.

I am trying to get a crwth, but they are very expensive and very few people make them.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:51 PM
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originally posted by: angelchemuel
a reply to: urbanghost
No, that just means mountain cat. Leopard is llewpard.
Rainbows
Jane


Yes it means that now, but originally it meant leopard or panther. I thought they were asking for a myth name for the leopards not the actual translation of leopard in Welsh. Maybe I misinterpreted the question?
edit on 28-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 05:53 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel

Well firstly I only know of one serious injury but he recovered. Most encounters that get physical are really no more than a deep scratch or a warning bite. These are very, very rare. Usually even a very close encounter is just a frightening snarl at worst. I've seen a photograph of a scratched belly. She literally walked into it in long grass and it swiped at her and scratched her through her Barbour. She and her husband had been baiting it with dead chickens to try and get a photograph. So please don't be freaked out, be honoured that you encountered one.

They can be friendly. Someone in the Forest of Dean was feeding one regularly but when the feeding site was discovered they took steps to frighten it off. In a different area an ex ambulance driver fed one buckets of fish heads regularly in a lay-by when he was driving at night for a fish farm. It came to recognise the sound of his engine and would appear shortly after he stopped. It even brought a cub to meet him. The cub took food from his hand. He said, "I saw everything as an ambulance driver. I don't care who believes me, I'm just saying what happened".

Now can I safely tell you they are sometimes seen in Cheltenham itself? A friend saw one at the bottom of his garden in Gloucester. There's a stream at the bottom of his garden, they often follow waterways.

I've written this... www.abovetopsecret.com...
And this... www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 28 4 2014 by Kester because: Addition

edit on 28 4 2014 by Kester because: (no reason given)


This is a recent news story..www.gazettelive.co.uk...
Notice "But experts said the evidence for big cats in Britain was shaky at best and that most sightings were probably “mistaken identity”.
That means you. And me on multiple occasions. And thousands of others. We're all "mistaken" according to 'experts'.

Anyway, back to Wales and history. I have noticed in my travels that I meet wise old Welsh men who gently share information with a timeless feel. English and Scots may be kind and rooted in their locality but there is an ancient feel about some of these Welsh fellows that I don't feel elswhere.
edit on 28 4 2014 by Kester because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

He was told a Welsh name for the big black cats in the pub but he couldn't recall what that name was.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: urbanghost

He was told a Welsh name for the big black cats in the pub but he couldn't recall what that name was.

could be a local saying.
Big Cats Society
Seems Wales is 4th for sightings. There is one near where I live called the Tonmawr Beast. I know people who have seen it.
Welsh Big Cats
edit on 28-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Ah, this 'Beast of ....' label. I actually feel this is part of the cover up. By labelling it this way they give the impression of one creature in one area and in that way play it down. A male could travel the length of Albion if he chose. The females seem more likely to stay in a smaller territory. The truth is they're everywhere, even London. One regularly sleeps in a thicket behind my brother-in-law's home. He knows when it's there by the atmosphere. Two days later it could be a hundred miles away.

I saw a comment on YouTube from a man who was making a documentary after seeing one from four feet away. I warned him he shouldn't talk about his documentary before it was finished or he or his documentary would be nobbled. He immediately asked me for an interview, drove from Hampshire to see me, filmed an interview and said every expert had told him there was a cover-up going on. I never heard any more about his documentary, though possibly he was just put off by the extreme strangeness that everyone who studies this in depth encounters.

One last funny story. My other brother-in-law feeds the foxes behind his caravan and likes cats. One night he went out with some chicken scraps and caught sight of a pair of cats eyes in the torchlight. He thought it was a stray cat and slowly approached it throwing scraps towards it saying "Here kitty. Nice Kitty. Do you want to live with us........BIG KITTY!"



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: beansidhe


On a side note and purely out of curiosity, why do you think that Iolo Morganwg was a forger? I've read that he was and read that he wasn't, and to be honest I'm confused.

As promised here is an example of Iolo Morganwg trickery. Take the Barrdas for example, Iolo tried to say that it was authentic Welsh druidic theology. He basically made it all up. What was supposed to be Bardic and Druidic knowledge was really just Welsh myths with a bit of Christianity and 16th century esoteric knowledge thrown in for good measure. He even made up an alphabet for this and said it was an ancient druid alphabet, Coelbren.
His first forgery was Barddoniaeth Dafydd ab Gwilym poems by the 14th-century poet Dafydd ap Gwilym. Again all Iolo's own work. It is now thought that he even made up a whole book of triads.
So bit of a naughty boy was old Iolo Morganwg. He fooled a lot of "scholars" of the time and helped in the mistranslation of quite a lot of Welsh legends.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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This has got to be the most beautiful piece of flint working I have ever seen.

It was found in Wales and is dated to about 5000 years ago. It is 8cm in length and is described as a ceremonial macehead.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 03:00 AM
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originally posted by: urbanghost
If you read my post properly you will see I mentioned his mother, or did you just ignore that bit?


To be honest, I got tired of wading through such a huge steaming pile of historic, revisionist crap I must have missed it! I lost interest pretty early on when you tried to claim the Welsh were the original inhabitants and some sort of pure-breed - blatantly false, nationalist bile.


originally posted by: urbanghost
I think you will find this is very wrong. Here is what is known about Owain's supposed maternal grandmother.
"Eleanor of England Countess of Bar was credited with a daughter also called Eleanor, who supposedly married a Welshman named Llywelyn ap Owain. Henry VII, the first Tudor king of England, was recorded as their descendant. Whilst no contemporary evidence for this daughter exists, except several later recorded pedigree by the college of Arms, caution is excised as it is possible Tudor historians may have invented her to give Henry VII additional royal blood on his father’s side."
So there is no evidence that his supposed mother even existed.


Actually, no - it isn't "very wrong". You have selectively found an (unsourced - although I found out where from, see later!) quote saying that there is doubt she existed, from some historians. Your quote only goes so far to "exercise caution", not that it is false and that is the best you could do? C'mon. In fact, aside from the Wiki page you so obviously lifted it from, all the actual historical sites I have read state she existed.


originally posted by: urbanghost
So that means he is not Welsh? I studied in an English university and joined the British army. Does that makes me less Welsh? That's the most ridiculous comment posted so far on this thread.


No, but with him being part of the Anglo-Welsh aristocracy (something you deny but historians continually refer to) it would have been seen as the favoured culture to educate him in. If his father was such a die-hard Welshman, surely he should have been educated by a Welshman? Fact is, he wasn't - he was cozied up to the English as he was, in part, English himself.


originally posted by: urbanghost
Just saying it doesn't make it so. Try reading some history books instead of Wikipedia.


Likewise - and where did I post a Wiki link? A poor attempt to "discredit" me because you cannot argue in any other way - ironic though, considering you used a Wiki source you your earlier comments on Eleanour - word for word what is in your (unsourced - I see why now you hypocrite!) post
edit on 29/4/14 by stumason because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: stumason
What you wrote about owain glyndwr was lifted from Wikipedia, all you did was change it around a bit.
What I quoted didn't come from Wikipedia. It came from here. Who are these historians who keep referring to him being Anglo-welsh? He was brought up in an Anglo-welsh household after his father was killed, so his father had no choice in where he was educated. That doesn't make him Anglo-welsh. It's the same as calling something Romano-British, it doesn't mean it is roman, only that it is from the time when the Romans were here. You say all these actual historical sites as if you are the final say as to what is historically accurate, post some links to them and let us see.
Resorting to name calling just shows that you know no other way of disputing what I have to say and is a sign of low intelligence. If you can't post without being abusive, I suggest you post elsewhere. You are just regurgitating the same thing over and over again, just a small piece of what I have written on the first page of the thread. Days ago. Move on, change the subject, it's getting boring now and has nothing to do with the thread.
edit on 29-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Do you have a source for this ancient mace-head. I would love to investigate its provenance, rather than take as read that it is 5,000 years old and came from Wales.

If this artefact is 5,000 years old, then the middle and late Neolithic. This is prehistory. Wales was just "land" in those days, well before the racial identity of the migrants was known.

Regards



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 01:35 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi
a reply to: urbanghost

Do you have a source for this ancient mace-head. I would love to investigate its provenance, rather than take as read that it is 5,000 years old and came from Wales.

If this artefact is 5,000 years old, then the middle and late Neolithic. This is prehistory. Wales was just "land" in those days, well before the racial identity of the migrants was known.

Regards

I found it on the welsh national museum page, I will post the link when I get home, it is on my other computer. There is a lot of good stuff on there that was found in Wales, gold capes, chariots, axe head hordes, golden crowns and some of the earliest iron objects found in the uk.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 01:36 PM
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Good series....

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: paraphi

I found a link so I will post it now. It's not the one I saw originally but it gives some info about it. Ancient mace head
edit on 29-4-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel

I remember when this was on the tv, not a bad series.



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 01:53 PM
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Here is the link to where I first saw the mace head. Gathering the jewels



posted on Apr, 29 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Thank you. I have looked it up from the Museum's website and here it is... ancient mace-head

It is amazing that someone made such an artefact with the tools at hand.

On topic though, the various migrations - or rather the theories - are well documented and widely agreed by historians and experts. In a world that was fluid with migrations and invasions it would be difficult to isolate Wales as somehow sacrosanct.

Regards
edit on 29/4/2014 by paraphi because: typo



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