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The Cymry or the true history of Britain.

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posted on May, 3 2014 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: urbanghost
Here is a picture of polished Preseli bluestone, it looks like a galaxy.

It is a very hard rock, harder than granite and is excellent for carving, I have on of these made from it.


Oh Wow...a green man in Preseli stone!!!!!

rainbows
Jane




posted on May, 3 2014 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel



Oh Wow...a green man in Preseli stone!!!!!


It is a lovely piece of stone. It takes pride of place on my altar.
I have seen skulls made from it, one sold at Bonhams the auction house for a few thousand a while back.
edit on 3-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 06:56 PM
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In Old Welsh the Green Man is called Ardduc. He was a god of the Silures. He lived in the oak trees. It is thought he represents Cernunnos.



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Back in ancient times, when I was 16 in fact, I was walking my parents dog in a magical piece of riverside woodland. I had just placed a badge, which I valued for it's beauty, tucked behind some ivy on a tree trunk as an offering to Pan. Walking up into the open I picked up a chunky stick to throw for the dog.

Where it had broken off the tree the knot looked distinctly like a goats foot. As I saw the resemblance, and prepared to throw it, a strong smell of goat entered my nostrils. The first uncomfortable feeling struck me before I threw it, I had time to back down, but I threw it as hard as I could.

To my horror I saw it was sailing in a curve that could bring it down directly on the running dogs head. It was heavy enough to do serious damage, I don't remember if I shouted but the stick hit the ground just ahead of the dog.

Then a powerful rush of wind blew through the treetops and I took off running. I ran across the disused viaduct and almost all the way home, deeply disturbed. I actually ran till I couldn't run anymore, that was how frightened I was.

Talking later to a well informed friend he told me "The word panic comes from Pan".

I've had no difficulty showing respect and acknowledgment before entering woodland or taking materials from the woods since then.

edit on 3 5 2014 by Kester because: Punktuation



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 07:44 PM
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I have found a more recent picture of this stone.

It is different to how it is originally drawn. Whoever drew it left off the penis' hanging from the bottom of their clothes!!!
New picture
Why would Christians be carving stones of people with their tackle out?

edit on 3-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 07:56 PM
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a reply to: Kester



I've had no difficulty showing respect and acknowledgment before entering woodland or taking materials from the woods since then.


At one time most of the South Wales coast was covered in oak groves. The oaks that grow in Wales are different to the English Oak. The Welsh ones are gnarly, twisted old things, tightly packed together. The folklore behind them says that when anyone invaded, the tribes would run to the oak groves and their enemies would be to scared to follow them because they were thought to be magical.
They have found ancient oak groves along the coast of Wales in recent years, after bad weather, from Bristol to Swansea.
None of my friends believe me but when I was a kid I heard a talking tree in woods near to where I live, my gran lives on a mountain. I was lost and the tree told me where to go. It sounds stupid, but to this day I am convinced that it wasn't a dream and it happened, I can remember every detail of it. Funny thing is I wasn't scared at all from what I can remember and it didn't feel weird. For a while after that when I went into the woods I kept hearing giggling in the undergrowth but could never find anyone.
Everyone will think I'm a crackpot now!!

edit on 3-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: Kester



Where it had broken off the tree the knot looked distinctly like a goats foot. As I saw the resemblance, and prepared to throw it, a strong smell of goat entered my nostrils.


This is just me rambling so take no notice.
There is a moth in Britain called the Cossus Cossus. The larvae of this moth are supposed to smell really strongly of goat. They live and feed inside tree trunks and branches. During the plague that nearly destroyed this country they used to use Goats Rue herb to treat plague victims, this also smells strongly of goat, hence the name and if you smelt it you knew there was someone with plague nearby. There is a school of thought that says we have inherited memories.
Like I said just me rambling.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 03:26 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Star, star, star, star, star.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 03:41 AM
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a reply to: Kester

I have to point out here I left the offering in a light hearted and non-serious manner. I quickly became more serious about what I'd awakened.

This is an essential message for all those who wish to build a traditional indigenous dwelling. Each blade of grass is sacred. Don't take it unless you need it and give thanks. This isn't some wacky old religion 'belief'. This is real. Respect the mother and she may respect you.

On the subject of traditional dwellings. The best route I'm aware of is 'A Non-Profit Making Educational Research Facility'.

Living the life vastly improves the ability to more accurately interpret archeological evidence.

The most tactful of your number should deal with all public relations. Let's face it, some of us are a little unsettling when we start talking about communication with trees, gargoyles or whatever. If they sent me out as an emissary the site would be turned into a glass parking lot. "The council have unanimously decided....... We nuke 'em."



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: Kester

Also the spirits will watch you as you begin building your home. You will notice the winds gusting around you and birds and animals will appear at crucial moments to oversee your work.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 11:06 AM
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originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: urbanghost

Tertullian, a Christian writer from Carthage lived and wrote between 160-220AD.
He wrote that "the parts of Britain which had been inaccessible to the Romans, were subdued to Christ".
So churches were established in Scotland before the time of Tertullian? No wonder St. Ninian was surprised to find that the druids practised a similar religion to him!



That is not really what he wrote. That comes from Adversus Judaeos, Against the Jews. What it really says is "...the haunts of the Britons - inaccessible to the Romans, but subjugated to Christ..." its in chapter 7. Its a rhetorical sentence, taken out of context, the book has nothing to do with Britain or its inhabitants. He thought that the pagan gods didn't exist, therefore there was nobody that couldn't be subdued by Christianity, something the pagan romans couldn't do. When this was written the romans had already been here for over 2 centuries.
edit on 4-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

It wasn't that. I've spent more time in hedges and ditches than I have between walls and under roofs. I've never experienced anything like that any other time. But thanks for pre-empting the doubters. Will star now.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Another source notes:




The earliest reference to Christianity in Britain is made by
Tertullian who wrote in Ad 208 of, ‘Places among the Britons unapproached by the
Romans but subdued to Christ.’ The reference is clear but precisely what Tertullian
meant is not easy to interpret. From this time, the Fathers mention British Christianity
regularly.



archive.churchsociety




He refers to the spread of Christianity into all nations, among them Roman Britain:
"...the haunts of the Britons - inaccessible to the Romans, but subjugated to Christ..." (ch. 7).

However it should be said that the sentence is a rhetorical one, and the remoteness of Britain is perhaps a literary commonplace (after all at this date Britannia had been a Roman province for nearly two centuries!) While Britain may be of special interest to us, it was hardly so to Tertullian, forming only a couple of words in a lengthy but vague sentence in a work devoted to something else entirely.

It would be unsafe to conclude from this passage that Tertullian had anything more than anecdotal knowledge of Christianity in Britain. But then again, it would equally be unsafe to say that he did not - who knows? Interesting, not improbable, but really suggesting only that at least some Christians thought they could safely say this without risk of dishonesty.


Tertullian

Agreed. We can't know how much knowledge he had of Britain, but it would be reasonable to assume that he didn't add it in for fun. We have only these snippets left of our own country's history and I think they require a considered reconsideration of what 'pagan' really meant.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Urbanghost I was so excited to hear you mention Tarrendeusant - I become aware of this place about 6 months ago and was amazed I'd never heard about it, I'm literally 15 mins away. I've been dying to go see it but it's said to be really difficult to find and in-amongst private farmland, have you been yourself?



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: paradisepurple
It is quite tricky to find, I used a gps to find it. It is down in a ravine, be careful going down. It is thought to be medieval, but some think it is older, dating to celtic times. There was only two faces originally, the rest are modern. The older faces there look similar to a celtic head found nearby.
There is a holy well very close and a fort. The place names are quite weird around there, there is a Penbwch Uchaf and Isaf, Upper Goats Head and Lower Goats Head. Tarrendeusant is right in the middle of them. Most of the other place names in that area have castle in them.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: urbanghost

For those who prefer to listen here he is.




Haha, I'm sorry but that video is just revisionist garbage and nationalist drivel, not to be taken seriously.

In fact, the whole video is strangely reminiscent of Afrocentrists claiming that aboriginal Europeans were black until the "whites from Siberia" displaced them. It's equally ridiculous.

Compare that to the claims in this video of "Trojan Britons" and "Irish Picts from across the North Sea". Just like the Afrocentrist nonsense, these idiotic statements are only worth a laugh and nothing more.

You see, urbanghost here has already shown some ignorance on the first page when he started talking about how Picts were "Gaelic and from Ireland".

These "Gaelic Picts from Ireland" according to urbanghost, actually have nothing to do with the Irish. Pict was just a Roman designation for all the diverse tribes living north of the Forth and Clyde. He may have been confusing the Picts for a group known as the Cruithni, who were Irish.The Cruithni came to Scotland and established themselves, possibly taking control over a few tribes, before being assimilated back into the population in a few generations.

Go tell an archeologist or a historian about the "Gaelic Picts from Ireland" and watch them laugh in your face.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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There are some outdated/misinformed theories floating around that the Cruithni and the Picts were related, but this has been proven to be false, it is generally accepted that "Cruithni" was used by the Irish to refer to Picts because they had no other word for them, and so used the name of the Northeastern Irish tribe which may have had some tenuous connections with the Picts because of the close proximimity of Southwestern Scotland and Northeastern Irleand:


__________


"Cruthin was used to translate Picti into Irish, Picti was never used to translate the Old Irish term Cruthin into Latin. Professor Dáibhí Ó Cróinín believes that the "notion that the Cruthin were 'Irish Picts' and were closely connected with the Picts of Scotland is quite mistaken" and Professor Kenneth H. Jackson has said that the Cruthin "were not Picts, had no connection with the Picts, linguistic or otherwise, and are never called Picti by Irish writers". The Cruthin cannot be distinguished by archaeology, in historical times the Cruthin spoke Irish and followed the Irish derbfine system of inheritance rather than the matrilineal system sometimes attributed to the Picts of Britain"
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posted on May, 4 2014 @ 02:52 PM
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a reply to: Gallowglaich

You seem jolly well informed. Can you tell us anything about the stone built Irish sweat lodges and the fungi consumed before entering them? Within t and c of course.

I had it from an illiterate Irish prize fighter that in his childhood the old folks would give the visiting youths mushrooms to eat and instruct them in some of the old ways so I won't take denial of that as being fact.

Hope this isn't getting too close to the edge.
edit on 4 5 2014 by Kester because: Capital I you racist scum.

edit on 4 5 2014 by Kester because: Apologies, I accidentally used lower case I for Ireland.

edit on 4 5 2014 by Kester because: I mean Irish. Bed now.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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originally posted by: Gallowglaich

You see, urbanghost here has already shown some ignorance on the first page when he started talking about how Picts were "Gaelic and from Ireland".



If you had bothered to read the next page you would see that I was quoting what the Welsh manuscripts say about the picts. Which is what this whole thread is about, what is written in the manuscripts.
edit on 4-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister
OP, you've taught me some things I certainly didn't know. thank you. threads like this are what keeps me coming to ats to learn and learn anew. Nice work.

Certainly true as historical records are never always accurate.




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