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The Cymry or the true history of Britain.

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posted on May, 2 2014 @ 05:08 AM
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a reply to: Gallowglaich

I've heard the same said about Cwmystwyth. The amount of material dug out of those mines is extraordinary. It's truly staggering to look at.
en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 2 5 2014 by Kester because: add link




posted on May, 2 2014 @ 07:35 AM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: Logarock

They say Tom Jones is a natural healer. Going to his concerts is like going to Lourdes.

I trust it isn't seen as rude to comment on your signature.
If they really knew better than us they wouldn't have to listen to us.



Right. My signature is sarcastic.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 07:54 AM
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originally posted by: Kester
a reply to: Gallowglaich

I've heard the same said about Cwmystwyth. The amount of material dug out of those mines is extraordinary. It's truly staggering to look at.
en.wikipedia.org...


I have often noticed that little is ever said about large scale weapons manufacturing and invasion strategy for controlling of ore. Imagine the huge demand for weapons grade metal that was going on with both sides during the rise and the height of the Roman empire. Large forging complexes turning out swords for use against the Romans, being shipped to nations fighting the Romans. And before this even. It appears that weapons manufacturing accounted for 90% of all ore mined around the world going back to say 2000 b.c.

For years the Phoenicians were suppliers of many things to powers around the Med going back into the bronze age. For bronze age powers tin was like uranium. I found a map of lost or forgotten copper stashes found along the waterways of Europe. Its fairly clear that sea vessels or barges of some sort were coming up those rivers and loading copper on ships and taking it out to any of the several well armed kingdoms in the Med area. Hittite, Greek, Syrian, Egypt ect. They found some Egyptian jewelry in a grave site at Cornwall.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: Kester
All the evidence has been there for years, archaeologists have just been burying their heads in the sand, blindly following these migration theories. Its like they don't want the ancient Britons to be responsible for anything.
As the stones came from Wales and the tribes in that area were renowned for their fierceness, nobody would have just taken those stones, not without their permission. That can only mean one of two things, either they took them there or they allowed them to be taken for some reason that came above all tribal rivalry.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: Kester
They found a gold sun disc at cwmystswyth.


edit on 2-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: Logarock

Interesting. When the Romans were running away from the Northern tribes they took this precautionary action to keep raw materials for weapons out of dangerous hands.
www.romanscotland.org.uk...



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Ah! That's where I dropped it!
Sorry, I'm always getting into trouble for my stupid jokes.
Seriously, for anyone who goes exploring at Cwymystwyth it's a very dangerous place. I saw a friend climb down into a funnel above a Cwymystwth working and the stones started to landslide down the hole. I remember his half amused, half terrified expression as he fought his way back up. We could hear the stones clattering down far below.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

In order for the modification of history to be orchestrated for political purposes there has to be a very long term plan. We're always told it's just a random happening. I'm not so sure.
History? That's just his story.
edit on 2 5 2014 by Kester because: their/there faceplant



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: Kester

Also the locals can be somewhat firm in their rejection of ignorant townie ways. To the extent of firebombing a crowd of lunched out semi-travellers who fled into the hills and spent two nights huddled with their dogs under one blanket. The bravest of their number crept down to a phone box in the middle of the night and phoned a friend in Salisbury who hired a van and drove up to rescue them. The moral of the story is, show respect for hard working Welsh farmers, or regret not doing so.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

This is me wearing a cardboard Sutton Hoo mask.

Available here.
www.steadfasttrust.org.uk...

I'm slow on the uptake but it's gradually sinking in what you're saying about the stones.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: Kester
Most of the theories put forward by archaeologists are from the earlier part of the 20th century. It is only now that most of these theories are shown to be lacking in evidence to support them. As I said earlier in this thread, in spite of what some posters would have you believe, mainstream thinking on these theories has changed radically in the last 10 years, even though the written history hasn't been adapted to take this into account. You only have to read archaeology publications from the last ten years to see for yourself. Most archaeologists now don't believe in large scale migrations to Britain. Here is what they have to say about the celts.



“Archaeologists widely agree on two things about the British Iron Age: its many regional cultures grew out of the preceding local Bronze Age, and did not derive from waves of continental ‘Celtic’ invaders. And secondly, calling the British Iron Age ‘Celtic’ is so misleading that it is best abandoned.” Dr. Simon James (‘Peoples of Britain’, BBC History, 1998)





“There was no cross-European Celtic people. There was no broad-based Celtic art, society or religion. And there were never any Celts in Britain.” Professor John Collis (‘British Archaeological News’, March 1994)




“No one is denying that people in Iron Age Britain spoke Celtic languages, or shared certain common cultural traditions with their contemporaries in mainland Europe, such as the use of La Tène ‘art’. What has been shown to be untrue, however, is that there existed a single Celtic race whose members all had the same religion, psychological traits, and type of society, and who recognised themselves as ‘Celts’... While there were contacts, and shared cultural elements across Europe, it is the differences in all aspects of life between neighbouring areas that seem to have been more important than the similarities.” Dr. J.D. Hill (‘British Archaeology’, no 17, September 1996)

The same goes for the beaker people. The beaker people were thought to be responsible for the introduction of metalworking and also for the construction of henges and stone circles. Archaeological evidence now found and analysed, shows that this idea does not hold the same standing as before. Beaker burials in Britain begin about 2400BC. Henges and stone circles in Britain have their origins before this, and, though there may have been developments inspired by ‘Beaker culture’, these were evolutionary rather than revolutionary.
edit on 2-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 09:59 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

For some reason this has come to mind after reading that. About 60 yards from Hetty Peglers Tump is a fissure with air gusting out of it at intervals. In winter the gusts are noticeably warmer than the surrounding air. It's probably a commonly known geological phenomena but it made me wonder whether there could have been a tunnel leading down from inside the Tump in the past.

It's thought the Tumps were roofed with overlapping slabs of stone which have since been taken for roadbuilding. If so they must have been dry and extremely well insulated. There are said to be traditional stone sweat lodges in Ireland and I wonder if the Tumps may have had that purpose.
edit on 2 5 2014 by Kester because: (no reason given)

edit on 2 5 2014 by Kester because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

I grew up surrounded by university staff. Charisma seems to be equal to evidence in forming the 'consensus'.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: Kester
There is a chambered tomb just down the road from where I live that is nearly exactly the same design as Hetty Peglers Hump. It is called Parc Cwm and is in the Gower. This area is covered with tombs, stones, circles etc. One of the richest areas in south Wales for this kind of thing. There is also a blowhole nearby on Wormshead


edit on 2-5-2014 by urbanghost because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: Kester

Just realised if you blocked up the surrounding fissures and had a hole leading down from inside, the Tump would have a heating system. Genuine eco heating says she who must be listened to.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

So does the evidence show original use as a tomb or was that a later use? I've always felt they had a more practical use in the beginning.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Not far from the yurts. That out of season holiday offer is starting to look very tempting.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: urbanghost
a blowhole nearby on Wormshead






posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: Kester
I can't find anything that says any earlier use of the tomb. It was built around 5850 BP and the area around it has had some of the oldest finds in the uk. The oldest human burial found in Britain (29,000 BP) comes from this area as does the oldest rock art (14,505 BP). All within a couple of miles.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: urbanghost

Ah this is it. It's called a tomb but was it always so? Calling it a chamber in which remains were found immediately opens up new possibilities just by using a different label. I find it hard to imagine such work going into a burial. Getting further into the possibilities it's been suggested some mound burials were of willing participants being buried alive in order to become a thinking part of the landscape.
edit on 2 5 2014 by Kester because: (no reason given)



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