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Light on Phobos, or More Cosmic Rays?

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posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 04:22 PM
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Just a little image we've been kicking around another thread. A little shiny pixel on Phobos taken by the Mars Curiosity Rover. Could be cosmic ray, I guess. Or IT COULD BE THE ALIEN MONOLITH SIGNALING MARS! Let me be the judge!

Source image: mars.jpl.nasa.gov...




posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I would have thought that its more likely to be a small impact by another bit of space detritus, than having any particular relation to the probable cosmic ray image that you are refering to from Curiosity.



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

How does this align with the "broken pixels" on one or two of the rover's cameras? I know you've answered this on the anomalies thread, but does the pixel "light" show up on photos from the same imager. Thanks!



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Hi blue Shift
I've noticed it too. At first glance it appear like a crossair.

But hey! Curiosity haven't crossair in its camera...

S&F.



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Just a little image we've been kicking around another thread. A little shiny pixel on Phobos taken by the Mars Curiosity Rover. Could be cosmic ray, I guess. Or IT COULD BE THE ALIEN MONOLITH SIGNALING MARS! Let me be the judge!

Source image: mars.jpl.nasa.gov...


It's probably a raised area on the surface that is above the shadow line in the first image so the sunlight is reflected.



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister
How does this align with the "broken pixels" on one or two of the rover's cameras?

It does not align with the broken pixels. It appears to be an artifact of its own.



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

Thanks. Since BlueShift has strayed away from our home at the anomalies thread I want to take this opportunity (and Spirit and Curiosity too) to say that he is one if, if not the, best finder of Mars anomalies on ATS. The things that BlueShift has pointed out to us there, day after day, month after month, aided and abetted (and sometimes bettered) by gifs and close-ups by funbox and quite a few others, go a long way in making it likely the best Mars-anomaly source on the internet. I say this with no less esteem for others who dwell amongst the rocks, yet since BlueShift is sharing this maybe-interesting-or-not discovery with a wider audience, I want to give him an applause from one of his brothers-in-rock-arms.


edit on 24-4-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

it looks like a ghost of the mainline and pixel , or its evil twin
. but they have a similar appearance long line , bright pixel .. it might be worthwhile to see if it can be spotted in the daylight photos

*after noticing Aleisters appraisal *

whole heartedly agree their matey , Mr Shift has found some crackers , and under extreme rigorous rules too , makes it difficult to shout pixilation with a Blueshift Pic


hats off to you m8tey

funBox


edit on 24-4-2014 by funbox because: wolves did it



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 06:29 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Aleister
How does this align with the "broken pixels" on one or two of the rover's cameras?

It does not align with the broken pixels. It appears to be an artifact of its own.



Why is there a faint line underneath it?



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 07:04 PM
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oh, very interesting, I too noticed a faint line .

But I notice all kinds of faint lines, so it could just be anything.

For the record, I'm all for Mars Anomalies. I love Hoaglands material on the subject and totally there was an ancient civilization there at one point, perhaps these anomalies are relics from there time period, pretty advance stuff to last that long out their.



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: Arnie123
oh, very interesting, I too noticed a faint line .

But I notice all kinds of faint lines, so it could just be anything.

For the record, I'm all for Mars Anomalies. I love Hoaglands material on the subject and totally there was an ancient civilization there at one point, perhaps these anomalies are relics from there time period, pretty advance stuff to last that long out their.

--
BTW, S&F



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 07:07 PM
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I think ET is having fun with us playing with our minds



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Just a little image we've been kicking around another thread. A little shiny pixel on Phobos taken by the Mars Curiosity Rover. Could be cosmic ray, I guess. Or IT COULD BE THE ALIEN MONOLITH SIGNALING MARS! Let me be the judge!

Source image: mars.jpl.nasa.gov...


Really interesting pic - thanks for posting!

I know you were probably being tongue in cheek re: monolith signaling Mars but I was wondering if you or anyone else knows if this "little shiny pixel" seems to be near the area on Phobos where the monolith is?

That would definitely make this even more curious & interesting...




posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: AthlonSavage

While E.T. plays....

Pulling out old-faithful again:



posted on Apr, 24 2014 @ 11:06 PM
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Could it be a moth? Or maybe a rod? Lens flair, dust, moisture, reflection from Lady Gaga's teeth?
That's all I got.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift



It does not align with the broken pixels. It appears to be an artifact of its own.



Au contraire


mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
edit on 4/25/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 02:36 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Good job!

I combined these two images using the "Difference" mode to exclude the digital noise / artifacts. Here's the result:

The small object next to Phobos is Deimos.

This technique isn't perfect, as it simply replaced the white pixel with black.

But it still demonstrates that the pixel is in the camera, not on Phobos.
edit on 25-4-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 02:37 AM
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a reply to: wildespace
Makes the jpg artifacts show up as well.



posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 02:51 AM
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a reply to: Phage





I love you bro....




posted on Apr, 25 2014 @ 05:39 AM
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a reply to: Phage

I must now agree with the other posters who are on to your game. You are obviously a shill sent with orders from TPTB Inc. to spoil the fun. To uncover the truth no matter how unseemly. To pull us all through your societal portals of angst.

That said and unbelieved......nice work! Alas, another Mars Light (this one a Mars MoonLight) goes out, leaving the God of War (this time, the MoonGod of War) in utter darkness once again *sounds of gnawing and gnashing of teeth heard*.




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