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U.S. to expand clemency criteria for drug offenders

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posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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I applaud the FEDS for relaxing some of the sentences for non violent drug offenders but the real problem is the FELONY discrimination for the rest of the persons life.

These draconian drug laws, locking people up for decades for personal use possession charges then ruining the rest of their life AFTER they complete their sentence with the stigmata of the felony.

The LAWS are so crazy that, EVERYONE... and when I say EVERYONE I mean EVERYONE, carry's a schedule 1 drug on them at all times.

Its called D.M.T.

Schedule 1

Your a potential FELON




posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:11 PM
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I was reading about this earlier.

Story

What do you people mean by victimless crime?

The woman in the article was arrested at 20 for selling meth, she served two years. She was arrested for selling meth again and served three years. At 27 she was arrested for selling meth once again. She was offered a deal if she "rolled" on the drug ring she was working for. She refused and was charged with a third strike as well as conspiracy to distribute. She got a 30 year sentence.



She sold meth to how many dozens if not hundreds of people? No victims there?

You people honestly believe she won't be selling again within a year of getting out?

I can understand releasing people that were caught with a few ounces of bud. People that are members of meth/coke trafficking cartels? No, let them rot where they are.

I can walk to the closest store and pass half a dozen "victims" of these criminals before I can buy a soda. Pretending drugs don't hurt anyone is wishful thinking to put it mildly.
edit on 21-4-2014 by 200Plus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:24 PM
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a reply to: 200Plus

Life is about choices, good decisions, bad decisions and consequences.

Its hard to do any of those with a 30 year sentence in prison.
edit on 21-4-2014 by Zaanny because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:28 PM
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a reply to: neo96

I will tell you what is wrong with that ...

"In 60 percent of all overdose deaths, prescription pharmaceuticals were to blame."

You have PHD's killing your kids not the hood rats in the city.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:29 PM
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originally posted by: 200Plus

What do you people mean by victimless crime?




Was she holding them down and forcing it into their bloodstream? If so, then that's assault... not a drug crime.
Was she claiming she was selling them some safe, legal alternative, only to be swerving them with the real deal? If so, that's fraud and likely assault tacked on... not a drug crime.
Was she breaking into their homes and replacing their medicine with the drug? If so, that's Breaking and entering with assault... not a drug crime.

Was she selling them something they knew and expected to be exactly what it was, which they they personally chose to use, fully aware of the results? Man, that free choice can be a royal bitch to deal with, but ya gotta choke down the responsibility pill and cast aside the victim card sometimes. Victims are either tricked or forced into something... it's pretty hard to go in eyes wide open, mind set to purpose, and then call yourself a victim.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:32 PM
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originally posted by: Zaanny

"In 60 percent of all overdose deaths, prescription pharmaceuticals were to blame."



You have PHD's killing your kids not the hood rats in the city.


You actually get it. The most prolific pushers in this country get mansions, yachts, fame, and public honor because they contribute to big pharma's bottom lines and make the Wall Street cats fat and happy. That's really the farce here.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:32 PM
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a reply to: Zaanny

She made all the wrong choices in her first 30 years outside prison. Crime has consequences.

I can work 40+ hours a week and make enough to pay my bills and keep my nose clean. It a hard choice but right for the family.

I can work 4-6 hours a day 4 days a week and make more money selling rock or horse. I get caught and I am going to jail. Easy choice because it is bad for my family.

She did her crimes, let her do her time.

If not, why then should we have any laws? Who are you or I do declare a person a victim?

Remember a few years back in Germany where one guy asked another guy to kill him and eat him? It was big news at the time. Both men were adults and neither were victims (they both consented). Yet one was charged with murder (rightly so IMO).



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

The drug trade (specifically "hard" drugs) are what I am mostly talking about.

Crime rates are higher in neighborhoods with heavy drug use. Why? People that need a fix have to get that money somewhere. Break-ins, theft, muggings, etc. are all a result of the narcotics trade.

We can claim that the person selling the drugs has no control over that and is not responsible for where the money come from.

Is the same not true about the "evil bankers" that gave out mortgages that people couldn't pay? It's not their responsibility to care where the money comes from as long as the people going into the home sale knew the price.

Eyes wide open indeed my friend.


edit on 21-4-2014 by 200Plus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:45 PM
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a reply to: 200Plus

I believe the topic was about leniency for non violent, victimless offenders.....

If you commit crime for your personal use habit, that is your CHOICE, albeit bad decision with coming consequences.

30 years for 3 strikes on personal possession is DRACONIAN.

Killers do less time
edit on 21-4-2014 by Zaanny because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: Zaanny

I am sorry I should be clear - I do not in any way condone any jail time for personal possession.

Trafficking and distribution are what I was referring to and the changes the WH are putting into place will let the traffickers go free as well.

The changes in the law are not just about people that got hit for small amounts. It will be the people selling the drugs as well. All drug related crimes are victimless crimes I suppose.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 10:26 PM
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originally posted by: 200Plus
We can claim that the person selling the drugs has no control over that and is not responsible for where the money come from.



Is the same not true about the "evil bankers" that gave out mortgages that people couldn't pay? It's not their responsibility to care where the money comes from as long as the people going into the home sale knew the price.



Ah! No, no I don't blame the banks for doling out bad mortgages because they were working within the legal framework of the time. (I disagree 100% with the bailout, however.) To reconnect it to the OP topic, I would be greatly opposed to street pushers getting rewarded/protected from loss using tax payer money. I'm not suggesting they're great folks who deserve our admiration (hell, I'm not suggesting anything at all about them). I'm advocating people take self responsibility and, if they make a personally pisspoor choice, then it's entirely on them. Nobody forced the dude making minimum wage to take out a mortagage on a $400,000 house.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

I am with you about the personal responsibility. I just think the "pushers" bear the responsibility and the guilt of the moral decline. They feed the beast, so to speak. Regardless of what they are pushing.

P.T. Barnum is often quoted as saying "there's a sucker born every minute", but when I learned the quote it was "there's a sucker born every minute, and two to take him".

Where do we find the clemency for the lives damaged by the meth/coke/heroin sold by these criminals. Whether that damage comes in the form of property value or physical distress. People just want to brush past that and tell one side of the clemency story.

Also, when granted clemency and released, and then there start selling dope again are we going to release them again in a few years? Or should we just do away with the whole drug offense category all together?



posted on Apr, 22 2014 @ 03:39 AM
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a reply to: neo96

1) this thread is not about guns
2) not everything is about guns
3) so what if people are ODing ? Why locking them up going to help anyone?
edit on 22-4-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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originally posted by: 200Plus
a reply to: Zaanny

She made all the wrong choices in her first 30 years outside prison. Crime has consequences.

I can work 40+ hours a week and make enough to pay my bills and keep my nose clean. It a hard choice but right for the family.

I can work 4-6 hours a day 4 days a week and make more money selling rock or horse. I get caught and I am going to jail. Easy choice because it is bad for my family.

She did her crimes, let her do her time.




20 years is excessive, that is more than someone can get for murder.

No you could as much money selling drugs for a couple hours a week than you can working 40 hours. That is myth that is sold to make the common person hate drug dealers and justify the draconian laws. In 99%* of the cases where someone is arrested for dealing, they are not really making a profit, they are simply dealing to pay for their habit.

The drug laws are in a serious need of an overhaul.


*I do not really know what the number is, but based on what I've observed I would estimate that being figure being over 90%.
edit on 22-4-2014 by jrod because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 22 2014 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: jrod

Umm, yes you can make way more money slinging dope than you can working 40 hours a week. Maybe not in suburbia where the average income is above 120K a year, but for sure here in Detroit where people line up for $8.50 an hour.

I have friends on both sides of the argument. I know for a fact which ones are making more money.

I agree whole heartedly that the drug laws need to change.



posted on Apr, 22 2014 @ 04:34 PM
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With legalization and all that comes with it gaining steam, this is a no-brainer really. Can't have people sitting in prison for 13 years in Louisiana for possessing something that people walk the streets doing in Colorado, can we? That would be the ultimate hypocrisy there.



posted on Apr, 22 2014 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: 200Plus

Not if you only 'work' a couple hours a week as a previous poster suggested. I know how the 'game' works.

Very few people actually profit from the drug trade. Like I said most of those who get arrested for dealing are not selling and making a profit, they are selling to help support their habit. Most of those rings who turn big profits in the drug trade also are vested in other illegal activity too. They also fair better when busted because they can afford a good lawyer.



posted on Apr, 22 2014 @ 07:00 PM
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a reply to: jrod

I cannot argue with you on this post really.

The only thing I would disagree with is I do not see a majority of "sellers" in my neighborhood being "users".

As with any business the lowest guys on the totem pole do the most work and get the least money. I have read reports that the typical "dealer" pulls in slightly less than minimum wage. I just do not see that nor have I experienced it. Most of the people I know that sell make far more than minimum wage and tend to use something other than what they sell (maybe that's what you meant by supporting their own habit - my brain damage is overloaded for the day. Sorry)



posted on Apr, 23 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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Thought this thread would generate more discussion.

Is it because this is talking about the situation at the federal level but it's really enforced is at the state level and that this is where the real reform needs to happen? Or?



posted on Apr, 23 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

I think the problem is many states are in cahoots with the prison industry and do not want clemency for drug offenders. Non-violent drug offenders do make better slaves than the violent criminals. Also there has been a lot of federal money given to states for drug enforcement the past 30+ years. They are afraid of loosing those funds.

edit on 23-4-2014 by jrod because: yep



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