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NYPD Commissioner-Turned-Felon Has a Message For Us Now That He's Been to Prison

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posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 10:41 PM
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This is an enlightening piece about America's backwards justice system as experienced from someone who has been on both sides of the law. Please take the time to also read the article, as I cannot cover the entire story in my thread. It's a great read.

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As the top cop who landed behind bars, he's arguably one of New York's most controversial figures. Bernard Kerik, 58, served as the police commissioner of New York City under former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. In 2010, after years of litigation, he was convicted of tax fraud and false statements and was sentenced to four years in federal prison. Today, he is a convicted felon.


He's been called a hero and a leader, a liar and a crook. But praise or condemn him, it's hard to argue that he doesn't have a damned interesting story. He said that throughout his career, he thought he understood the criminal justice system. But it wasn't until the tough "lock 'em up" cop with the Tony Soprano-like swagger was suited up in prison uniform, mopping floors and living in a small room with three other men that he realized: He knew "nothing," he said, until he was on the other side of the bars.





He was one of 2.4 million prisoners in the United States. Because of mass incarceration, the country now accounts for 25% of the world’s imprisoned despite making up, overall, just 5% of the world's population.



Andrew Kreig, an attorney and investigative reporter who covered the 2010 court proceedings, wrote in a recent message that, "Judges and prosecutors treated [Kerik] ruthlessly. … I eye-witnessed the shocking unfairness directed against him."


I cannot say I feel for him in the least TBH. He subjected thousands of people to the same injustices he feels he's now faced. It's amazing how your views change after experiencing what you put so many people through yourself as a part of the system.


"The unfortunate thing is you take these young men and women, you lock them up for years under these Draconian sentencing guidelines, and then you let them back into society," he said. "Do you absolutely think that they're going to be better people? Because … if these are first-time offenders, and they've never been in the system, the only thing you've done for them is institutionalize them. The only thing you've taught them in reality is how to steal, cheat, lie, con, manipulate, gamble and fight."


This will be the last part I pull from the source article, but again, please read this, as it's a terrific piece.


Kerik wanted to emphasize the collateral damage of a conviction. "There are probably 50,000 collateral consequences of your felony," he said. To be labeled a felon commonly means, among many things, ineligibility for food stamps and public housing, discrimination from private landlords, losing your vote and denial of a wide range of jobs. Kerik noted that becoming a garbage man or a barber is often not an option because it requires state licensing, off-limits for convicted felons.

On top of it, in many states, if an ex-offender on probation cannot get a job in a certain period of time, he or she can be sent back to prison.


Source Article




posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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Always remember...

Karma's only a BLEEP if YOU are.




posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: freakjive

The guy does have an interesting story. And, I like they way you point out how perspective matures based on the experiences from life one draws upon. A little refresher we would all do well to take in ... lest uncle aunt karma pays us an unannounced visit.

edit on 2042014 by Snarl because: Nod to Murgatroid's post above



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 11:31 PM
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LOL Good for him .

Funny how the government looks the other way with the rise of police brutality and the treatment of their heavy hand but as soon as some lowly peon doesn't pay their share of his meager to their master they will ship and toss them off as soon as possible good for him to learn how ruthless his masters are .

Not all criminals are bad people the ones who have "reformed themselves" and have proven so should have some rights back such as voting and travel as for employment well that is between the person and employer .



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 03:48 AM
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a reply to: freakjive

The prison system is a business... There's no rehabilitation. I don't know why they don't just give every felon a life sentence because they pretty much are already. I thought criminals go to prison as punishment so why doesn't the punishment end when they are released? Especially non-violent offenders... It's disgusting. IMO they did the time then it should be over.

I've seen first hand what incarceration does to first time non-violent offenders. I've seen kids tied as adults. It does nothing but break them permenently. If we were really interested in rehabilitation then prison is the last place these people should be going. You treat a human like an animal long enough and eventually they're gonna bite.

I don't see any of this changing within our current system though. Prisons make too much money. I feel like the system is far too corrupt to be able to handle the changes needed in an adult, progressive way. Plus, public opinion is poisoned. I think many people would like to see public hangings make a comeback! I think we need a big step toward maturity, compassion and love.

There are those who prey on the weak and compassionate. I'm not talking about those lost souls. Some people just do not belong within society period.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 04:34 AM
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I a reply to: freakjive

I am a felon and it's near impossible to get a job. I'm getting sick of it to the point of revolt. My only prior was a drunk in public.

We've been collectively screaming te same thing forever.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 04:42 AM
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a reply to: freakjive




The only thing you've taught them in reality is how to steal, cheat, lie, con, manipulate, gamble and fight."


Isn't that pretty much a standard description of a US politician?

Anyway, as others have said, this guy's a hypocrite.

Fine all the time he's doing it to others, not so good when it's done to him.




edit on 21-4-2014 by MysterX because: added info



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 04:54 AM
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the system is broken in many ways, or is it? just look at the fact one prison is calling it slavery, are they wrong or right? it does seem that by all the laws and restrictions put on ex-cons they are being set up to go right back in.

one of the first things that needs to be done away with are many of the restrictions an ex-con currently faces. sure when you are in prison, not being able to do things like vote make sense, after all you are supposed to be in there for a reason, to pay for some sort of crime. but once you have served your sentence, why do you pay for the rest of your life? especially when people are put away for minor, non violent offenses. not to mention the many that were never guilty in the first place.

i know a person who was locked up because he did not pay his child support. why did he not pay? was he just deciding that he had no need to pay? no he wasn't paying because he HAD NO JOB. in fact he was living in someones garage and eating food that people gave him, he was living on complete charity. how was he supposed to pay with no money? yet for the better good he was locked up. now how has locking him up helped him or his children? did it give him some sort of training to be able to find and get a job? thus enabling him to pay his share? no, in fact it has done just the opposite. he is now even less likely to be able to find a legal job. so lets see he was put away because he had no job, then because he was put away he can't get a job, that has helped him and his children exactly how? currently he survives because he lives with his currant girlfriend who he has a couple more kids with, and who is on welfare. but what else is he supposed to do? he couldn't find a job before, now that he has a record it is even more guaranteed that no one will hire him, at least for a totally above board job. there were a couple places willing to hire him, but he was warned off by friends because those places were not completely legal operations and whenever they would get caught, they would throw the ex-con under the bus and claim that they were doing it on their own without the knowledge or consent of the owners. what other options are there? well he could deal drugs, he could steal, he can work illegally under the table, he can do anything that is illegal because that is the only set of occupations that are really open to an EX-con. is it any wonder that people re-offend when that is the only real way left open for them to earn money? it's exactly like the system was designed to create "permanent inmates", by making sure that they have to do illegal things to live, or be in jail.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 05:07 AM
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a reply to: generik

This is the way i see it;

If you offend against society and the crime is serious enough to warrant a prison term, that prison term IS the punishment for your offending, and the punishment ought to be considered cruel and unjust if it continues on, for years past your release from prison.

Once you have served out your prison term and any period of probation (if any), your slate is clean IMO.

To continue to persecute a citizen, after serving their punishment for a particular offence, is essentially punishment for life, for any crime.

Not conducive to a healthy society, or individual.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 05:21 AM
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Uve a reply to: MysterX

I've said I many times already.

It's creating an underclass and it's going to eventually get dark. There's 20 million felons in the usA and most of us are out of work.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 05:25 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

20 Million...and rising.

Kind of a penny dropping moment in connection to the 2nd amendment fiascos, when a high and increasing percentage of a country's people are being shoved down the toilet and given no chance to climb out.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 05:27 AM
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Theres a reply to: MysterX

There's going to be backlash. Cloven bunny is a small example of people waiting for the opportunity to stand up for their rights.

If I coulda been there I woulda been. When it's close enough to me I will.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 05:28 AM
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So why don't we change this. Put an end to what is going on instead of bitching about it? The only way it's gonna stop is by the people (us) demanding it be gotten rid of. Time to take to the streets folks, contact your friends go viral. It has worked for so many other things, why not this. Unless it's just another inconvenience that requires to much time to fight. I fully believe if enough people got together they could make a difference and restore some rights to felons that never should of been lost to begin with. Who knows the next time it just might be you facing the barrel of that gun....



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 05:31 AM
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Na reply to: jaynkeel

Ummm this is the Internet, it is goin viral.

It starts with communication.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 05:41 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

What I was trying to say was keep it in the spotlight. You say 20 million felons out there, strength in numbers. And I am willing to bet out of those 20 million a handful are brilliant and capable of starting up their own business which employs only felons. Short on time right now but would love to get some ideas floating out there. Someone start the idea in motion and I would gladly be the 1st to give a handful of $$ to start the ball in motion. I much like any out of work felon don't have much thee days but would give whatever I could to help the cause. A few times I have found myself a hairs width from being on the other side of the situation, hell I lost out on a chance to join the armed forces when I was younger by having to take a plea deal on something I didn't do. Whatever the case I am on your side,just throwing out ideas...



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 06:04 AM
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a reply to: freakjive
Kerik is a man of interest in the 911 Truth Movement.
The first time the public was handed the yarn about "no secondary devices" came from Mayor Guiliani on TV.
When asked the question he deferred to Kerik standing behind him who shook his head no.
I wonder if Kerik would like to elaborate on why he said such a bold faced lie.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 06:55 AM
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I haven't read the article just yet, but wanted to agree with a number of posts here, that if you've done the time and paid off any restitution, then you have paid your debt to society and should have all your natural born rights restored.

Some people may go on the straight and narrow and may even feel they need to do something more for their victims after prison, they have learned their lesson. Others may come out bigger criminals than when they went in after getting schooled in the prison system, they learned a lesson as well.



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 07:09 AM
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originally posted by: onequestion
I a reply to: freakjive

I am a felon and it's near impossible to get a job. I'm getting sick of it to the point of revolt. My only prior was a drunk in public.

We've been collectively screaming te same thing forever.

Same here. I was a guest for 18 months in two of her Majesty's many hotels. Not for being drunk, but for other stuff. It was the only time I've been in trouble. I don't moan about it because I was guilty.

My conviction is now spent under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act, I don't have to disclose my conviction any more on job applications. Great, now I stand a better chance of actually getting a job? Wrong.

I now have a gap in my employment history where I was in jail, and long gaps in-between jobs since then which doesn't look impressive on a CV, and potential employers ask me to account for this. How do I account for it without disclosing my criminal past? My 'good character' is restored after 10 years under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act when it comes to employment, but employers can still discriminate against ex-cons by looking at work history. The ROA doesn't mean jack.

It's pointless trying to play a game where the system is stacked against you. I've tried it and it's got me nowhere. The only way to win is not to play.
edit on 21-4-2014 by doobydoll because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-4-2014 by doobydoll because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 08:27 AM
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Another problem is the laws...If I had complete freedom to access everyones life on ats I could find a felony somewhere on most of you...and when they want you...they will find something somewhere on you...then divide up the charges into multiple counts so you are facing dozens of years in hopes you will take a plea agreement. They can also block evidence that narrows the picture of the case. Its a joke. Now im getting all worked up again...f this country...
edit on 21-4-2014 by cosmicexplorer because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2014 @ 01:39 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
I a reply to: freakjive

I am a felon and it's near impossible to get a job. I'm getting sick of it to the point of revolt. My only prior was a drunk in public.

We've been collectively screaming te same thing forever.


This morning I posted in another thread about the prison system and how my younger brother was incarcerated for nearly a decade.

He's been out for about 5 years now and it's been a real struggle for him. I was more than willing to give him a place to stay as he had absolutely no where else to go and after giving him about a month to readjust to his freedom, I helped him find a job. Any job...he needed to work and start rebuilding his life.

Well, guess what...he barely got hired on at McDonalds! The only reason he did (as he later found out) was because he's a good looking guy and the manager was a single and very horny chick. (It worked out great for both).

From that point on, the only thing he has been able to get is jobs from a temp agency.

He's worked hard to rebuild and I'm proud of him but, I see the despair he is going through knowing that his options are so limited.

Granted, it is no fault but his own and he knows that. It just sucks that he was with the wrong people in the wrong place and made a really stupid mistake when he was 18. I could just strangle him sometimes.


I wish you luck and hope you catch a break in the near future.
edit on 21-4-2014 by MagesticEsoteric because: (no reason given)



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