A Third and a double light source on the slopes of Mount Sharp. Curiosity Sol 603.

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posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 01:29 AM
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A third mysterious source of light (a couple of shining objects) detected by the Rover Curiosity, right above the slopes at the horizon on Sol 603. mars.jpl.nasa.gov... Two different bright lights hovering above Mount Sharp.
Recently seems Gale Crater is an "Hot Spot" for this kind of sightings...





Busy. Busy time for the "cosmic rays" in these days on Gale Crater.

Sarcasm apart, it's time for NASA/JPL/MSSS give a clear explanation on what really happen in these days on Gale Crater.
Last Related Threads on this topic:
www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...




posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: Arken

How do we know that this isn't something man made? Is there information about whats flying around out near mars?

If it's not man made, then I'm not sure what else it could be?



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 01:35 AM
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a reply to: Arken

S&F!


Awww ... they are too far above the horizon for me to suggest they may be lasers being pointed at the rover!


Unless ... they are lasers coming from orbit!


Nasa needs to come up with a credible answer very quickly methinks!



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 01:36 AM
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My guess would be stars, as they are hanging up in the sky. I would assume that you can still see stars from mars, one of those dots could be earth perhaps.

Interesting nonetheless



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 01:38 AM
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a reply to: knoledgeispower




If it's not man made, then I'm not sure what else it could be?


according to the "new crowd" here on ATS, these could be cosmic rays.....
But who knows really...



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 01:42 AM
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Maybe you should pull up the coords of that pic in Stellarium and rule out moons and stars before jumping on this dead horse again.

Rule everything out FIRST, then go off the deep end if you can't verify (not beforehand)



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 01:58 AM
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I dont buy the cosmic ray thing. Nothing I've read about them gives me the notion that they are visible to the naked eye. Cant find a picture of any. Just hypothetical drawings. None of em look like specks of light or geysers of light erupting from the surface. As for what it might be I dont have any answer for that. I'm just making a statement because people always says cosmic ray but I'm wondering what pictures they use to base their assumptions off of. Mars does have 2 moons that are rather small...the size of asteroids. Thats my best guess.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:03 AM
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a reply to: rustyclutch


. Nothing I've read about them gives me the notion that they are visible to the naked eye.
They aren't. But a digital camera is not a naked eye.


I'm wondering what pictures they use to base their assumptions off of.

Things like this. It is an image taken of the sky of Mars at night.
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:07 AM
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a reply to: Phage



Things like this. It is an image taken of the sky of Mars at night.


We want see something like that, taken during the Mars daylight, as the camera Rover's do.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:11 AM
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sorry arken, this one is nothing like the other lights.

is it in only one cam?

one is a dot of light the other is smudged.

i like your finds and don't like to rain on parades.


what they are? hell if i know.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:15 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Yeah I know but if they had been seen with digital cameras prior to this then there would be pictures for me to find easily when I google them. There arent. The best they can do is show some picture of some far away galaxy with gas clouds. When you can show me a legit picture of a cosmic ray I will acknowledge you. Until then you are just giving your opinion. I look forward to those pics.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: rustyclutch

When you can show me a legit picture of a cosmic ray I will acknowledge you.

I just did.
What do you think those spots and streaks are?


I look forward to those pics.
What do you expect to see in them?
edit on 4/20/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: Arken
Like this?
Well above the horizon:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

Well below the horizon:
files.abovetopsecret.com...

All over the place:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

Another:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...
edit on 4/20/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:23 AM
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Third time's the charm? I don't think so. It just shows that it is MORE unlikely that they're light sources.






posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Your proof of what the object is? Because I find it rather amazing that the only pictures online anywhere of a cosmic ray are from the Mars rover. I want proof of what the object is. Too many people waste their time arguing opinion and giving very little fact. I stated that what I said in my first response was my OPINION. Unless I state is at fact me and you have nothing to debate about. You can give your opinion without dragging me into your speculations. I can make my own speculations. Give me some EVIDENCE and I might consider what you are saying. Showing me another picture of another unidentified object in the sky isnt proof of anything. I asked for a picture of a cosmic ray. Not another picture of a random object on Mars. Still waiting. And a picture of the Mars night sky and all of the stars doesnt classify as a cosmic ray. I want to be able to clearly tell what I am looking at and I want it from a reliable source. If you cant provide these....you have no idea what a cosmic ray looks like either.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:26 AM
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Typical "cosmic rays streaks" can be detected in the dark or during the night. These fast particles hit the camera and leave a "streak". They need the DARK to be detected with and a complex subtraction of that particular frame.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: rustyclutch

Tell me what you think it is. You do realize that the picture in OP came from Right Navigation Camera? The "light sources" doesn't appear in the left navigation camera. Both cameras take pictures at the same time.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:32 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Arken
Like this?
Well above the horizon:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

Well below the horizon:
files.abovetopsecret.com...

All over the place:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

Another:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...


These are not cosmic rays!.....

Thanks for the links.


As I said in the post above:



Typical "cosmic rays streaks" can be detected in the dark or during the night. These fast particles hit the camera and leave a "streak". They need the DARK to be detected with a complex subtraction of intensity and manipulation of that particular frame.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:34 AM
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originally posted by: Arken
Typical "cosmic rays streaks" can be detected in the dark or during the night. These fast particles hit the camera and leave a "streak". They need the DARK to be detected with and a complex subtraction of that particular frame.


Where did you hear this?



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 02:35 AM
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a reply to: Arken


As I said in the post above:
Your statement is false. A cosmic ray is able to saturate pixels at day or night and it requires no processing for them to be visible on a digital image.


It turns out that both cosmic rays and glinting rocks are pretty common on Mars. They've been spotted before. Such rocks have been seen in images sent by several of NASA's Mars rovers, and cosmic rays appear in images that Curiosity sends to Earth each week.

news.nationalgeographic.com...

edit on 4/20/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)





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