Iranian Mother Saves Son's Killer From Execution

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posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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An Iranian mother has spared the life of her son's killer, by removing the noose from around his neck, instead of pushing the chair out from underneath him.

Balal, the convict, murdered Abdollah in 2007 by stabbing him to death with a kitchen knife. The cops caught up with him eventually, and he was convicted to death.

Apparently, this act of forgiveness has no bearing on sentences, but Iran has bowed to unexpected happenings in the cases of executions before.


The mothers of Balal and Abdollah grieve with one another, after the execution was halted.

www.theguardian.com...
edit on 18-4-2014 by daaskapital because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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Just goes to show and prove that there IS compassion in human beings.
Bravo to her. Not many females would have the strength to do that in those countries, given how voiceless the women are to be there. I stand up and give her two thumbs up.
Mercy shown by one who had the absolute worst thing happen to her (losing a child to murder, how horrific!) in a pretty bad country says a LOT. Hopefully more will start to follow her example.

Hopefully she won't be made an example OF, too, by those who wish to keep everyone terrified there.
Bravo, dear woman. Sincere bravo to you.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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Very sweet act of forgiveness. Rare among Shiites.

Meanwhile a proselytizing Christian condemned to death.....



posted on Apr, 19 2014 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: daaskapital

I was under the impression that under Sharia law the family of the wronged could forgive / take blood money in exchange for stopping execution (qisas - Eye for an eye). Under Iranian law the family determines life and death only. A jail sentence is still possible.

edit on 19-4-2014 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2014 @ 05:43 PM
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Wow..



posted on Apr, 19 2014 @ 11:43 PM
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Wow. Maybe she thought about the mother of this man and wanted to spare her the pain.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 03:21 AM
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a reply to: sarra1833

Women in Iran are not "voiceless" - they actually do rather well considering the Sharia law they have. They're not prohibited anywhere near like the Saudi women are, they can go to school, drive, occupy important posts etc.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 03:23 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Indeed. Apparently there was a large campaign in Iran to save him led by celebrities against the death penalty and some had even raised the "blood money" for the family. Apparently, both lads were promising footballers back in the day and the mother has said she will use the money to start a football club for young men to keep them out of trouble.

It is good something positive came from the death of the lad



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:35 AM
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originally posted by: stumason
a reply to: sarra1833

Women in Iran are not "voiceless" - they actually do rather well considering the Sharia law they have. They're not prohibited anywhere near like the Saudi women are, they can go to school, drive, occupy important posts etc.



I assume Iran and Saudi, when it comes to religion and what that religion states, would be night and day based on their religious differences?

Sunni Islam
Shia Islam

Correct me if I am wrong.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

you are correct.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:45 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Certainly seems that way - they pretty much despise each other being the equivalent of Protestants vs Catholics. But as I understand it, Sharia is Sharia, although there are extreme interpretations of it, of which Iran is not one of the followers.

For a Muslim, theocratic country, they treat their women very well indeed and rarely enforce the moral codes on them, in the cities at least (the country is a bit more conservative, but isn't it the same in every nation?)



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:49 AM
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Question -

Does Iran use the mutaween like Saudi Arabia does?



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:49 AM
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As I said on the other thread about this ... I'm glad he was spared by an act of compassion from the mother. But I hope he's still in jail for a good long time. The guy IS a killer.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:50 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Ayatollah Khamenei has one, led by his son.
edit on 20-4-2014 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:52 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

They are called the Basiji (sp?) I believe.

It comes in peaks and troughs, the enforcement, depending on who is President it seems. With Ahmadinejad, it became quite strict, but before and after not so much. They might get a ticking off for kissing in public, or unmarried couples holding hands, but the Iranians are quite good at getting around these "rules" (like sharing public taxi's) and for their part , the Basiji don't seem to bothered about enforcing it, as long as on the surface everything seems nice and Islamic.
edit on 20/4/14 by stumason because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:53 AM
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a reply to: stumason

They do not report to the president. They report only to the WF. The Ayatollah is the only who controls them.
edit on 20-4-2014 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:54 AM
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a reply to: OpinionatedB

I never said they did
just that their activities seem to coincide with whether there is a moderate or hard-liner in power. They are subordinate to the Rev Guard, I believe.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:54 AM
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a reply to: stumason
a reply to: OpinionatedB

Thank you both.



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 05:55 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

I'm no expert, btw - I have just read a lot about the place..

Seems nice enough, better than many places. Still wouldn't live there, though...



posted on Apr, 20 2014 @ 06:23 AM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan But I hope he's still in jail for a good long time. The guy IS a killer.

Is he a killer? Or was he just a naïve youngster?

Six years ago he stabbed someone who died. Does that make someone a 'Killer'?





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