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The Sun is Invisible in space!!

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posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: GallopingFish


Your eyes are made of matter. And covered in moisture. The light could reflect off that moisture or the outer layer of your eyeball itself.




posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: 3n19m470

I agree we still "know" little about how the Sun / Stars works.

But a number of probes have been sent to the Sun. And none recorded a drop in visible light as it approached. Which would expected if this theory was correct.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: GallopingFish

Maybe I misunderstood, but it seemed to me you were making statements of fact rather than just stating "what if"-type speculation.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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Under the Photosphere are electromagnetic radiation waves that we cannot see.

If i had a infa red torch and shone it into your eyes. can you see it?



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: GallopingFish


" People have got to try harder to understand something in a different manner "


Most people are far too lazy to do this. They usually just take offense. Especially academics who HATE new ideas.

An old idea slightly modified ( so it can be cited ) is Ok. But a breakthrough idea. Now that is a fight.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: GallopingFish
I don't know what to say
I'll just shake my head



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Yeah sorry, I am pretty bad at anything on a computer.

Im not stating anything. But its a neat possisility that people refuse to ponder.

That was all really. Im not going to try to convince anyone who doesnt want to think about it.





posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 04:58 PM
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originally posted by: thedeadtruth
a reply to: GallopingFish


" People have got to try harder to understand something in a different manner "


Most people are far too lazy to do this. They usually just take offense. Especially academics who HATE new ideas.

An old idea slightly modified ( so it can be cited ) is Ok. But a breakthrough idea. Now that is a fight.



Thank you, am i right in saying that people need to consider a concept outside their conventional thinking.

All of thier first thoughts are to face palm or head shake when they don't believe or understand.
Information, knowledge and theorizing should never offend anyone anyone. But it does.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 05:13 PM
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This was just posted yesterday.

Jeremy Kasdin: The flower-shaped starshade that may help us detect earthlike planets.
youtu.be...


edit on 18-4-2014 by Libertygal because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 05:14 PM
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Description: Between December 1968 and December 1972, a total of nine Apollo spacecraft carried human crews away from the Earth to another heavenly body. Primary navigation for these missions was done from the ground.

As a backup, and for segments of the mission where ground tracking was not practical, an on-board inertial navigation system was used.

Astronauts periodically used a sextant to sight on stars and the horizons of the Earth and Moon to align the inertial system, and to verify the accuracy of the Earth-based tracking data.



Astronaut James Lovell sighting through the sextant, during the Apollo 8 mission, December 1968. His right hand is operating the controls that indicated to the computer that the bodies found in the telescope were aligned. Photo: NASA

More at Link


Can not see stars in space? Guess this sextant was fake and part of the Apollo mission cover ups...



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 05:21 PM
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a reply to: GallopingFish

There is nothing wrong with having an open mind, but not so open it falls out.

Then, it might get stepped on before you put it back. Imagine what a mess that would be on the botttom of your shoe!

Or worse, between your toes. Ew...



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 05:26 PM
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originally posted by: Libertygal
a reply to: GallopingFish

There is nothing wrong with having an open mind, but not so open it falls out.

Then, it might get stepped on before you put it back. Imagine what a mess that would be on the botttom of your shoe!

Or worse, between your toes. Ew...




Yes. Having an open mind to consider new possibilities is on thing.

However, too many people read something on the internet and blindly believe it without attempting to confirm it themselves, either through critical thinking or through further research. They sometimes just say "that idea sounds cool to me, so I'll believe it to be the case".






edit on 4/18/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: Rob48

I think it's part of that "core cirriculum".

I honestly have no other answer.

Someone should post Sagan's Pale Blue Dot. This would be the perfect thread for it. Actually, the guy in the video above shows that exact pic! I just rewatched the video. It's actually pretty cool.



edit on 18-4-2014 by Libertygal because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: thedeadtruth


Most people are far too lazy to do this. They usually just take offense. Especially academics who HATE new ideas.


Don't know many academics, do you? At least not scientific academics, that's for sure. New ideas are the life blood of science. If academics were averse to new ideas, the means by which you are reading these words would never have come about. The fibre optics and satellites that carry your words around the world, those were new ideas. Transistors and silicon chips? Ground-breaking stuff. The World Wide Web? That was a new idea too.

New ideas are brilliant, if you test them and judge them on their merits and find they are valid! New ideas that you heard about on YouTube and like because they sound kinda cool and far-out are, I'm afraid, somewhat less likely to set the scientific world alight with the excitement of cutting-edge discovery.

edit on 18-4-2014 by Rob48 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 06:14 PM
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In the first video in the OP the expert also says that the sun is yellow.

He obviously is working from preconceived childhood memories. The sun is not yellow. The sun, when seen from space (and yes, it can be) would be stark blinding blazing white.



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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Open mind and non-conventional thinking are good to a point. That point being things like holocaust denial or the anti-vaccination campaigns. Or homeopathy. Or drilling holes in mental patient's skulls to let the evil spirits out, like the ancient and medieval people did.

Education and science are the way forward, and you don't move forward by discarding what we have learned by using scientific method.
edit on 18-4-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 06:24 PM
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originally posted by: Libertygal
a reply to: Rob48

I think it's part of that "core cirriculum".

I honestly have no other answer.

Someone should post Sagan's Pale Blue Dot. This would be the perfect thread for it. Actually, the guy in the video above shows that exact pic! I just rewatched the video. It's actually pretty cool.




I posted that pic back in the thread here:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

(The actual "pale blue dot" pic was a zoomed segment of that image I believe.)

As we can see, even from nearly 4,000,000,000 miles away, 40 times further from it than we are, the sun is rather visible in space!
edit on 18-4-2014 by Rob48 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: Rob48

Yep! I starred it, too. Just found it. Excellent image for this thread!

Of course, there will be some invented reason why we see the sun in that image, as well, but, boy - I miss good old Carl.

And, as I said, it was also shown in the video I posted above, which is all about the development of a new telescpope which can see around suns and find planets by sending out a flower petal shaped sun shade to block the sun. Now, why would we need to do that if it were invisible?

edit on 18-4-2014 by Libertygal because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 06:58 PM
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you can never see stars in a space photo!

You can not see the path of light!!!
you can see the path of a laser.
as it makes the very small dust shine.
or reflect light.
you get this with sun light some times too.

whit light that shines on a card that absorbs red light.
will reflect back blue.

yes you will see blue.
but the card is Not effecting the blue light!
it is only effecting the red light.
so is the card red or blue?



posted on Apr, 18 2014 @ 06:59 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister
In the first video in the OP the expert also says that the sun is yellow.

He obviously is working from preconceived childhood memories. The sun is not yellow. The sun, when seen from space (and yes, it can be) would be stark blinding blazing white.
Actually this chart shows it in the yellow region:

www.eso.org...


However it looks white in the picture I posted of it here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

So if you say the picture shows it's white rather than yellow I'd agree. However, this camera isn't necessarily capturing an accurate representation of the sun, so it may just be the sensor is saturated which can happen even more quickly if we look at the sun, which we really shouldn't do. Astronomer's instruments say it's yellowish as that diagram indicates, but it's not a deep yellow, it's a whitish yellow.

edit on 18-4-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification




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