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The Sun is Invisible in space!!

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posted on Aug, 31 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: GallopingFish

If you think the sun is invisible in space then explain to me shadows on the moon? Or is that a conspiracy too?




posted on Aug, 31 2014 @ 04:29 PM
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Indeed you can't see the sun in visible light...because you see the light...not the sun. The space body itself is hidden behind light. A flashlight is the perfect example...already stated.

You see the light...but not the object radiating that light.

It can be seen tough in other light frequency spectrum, but not visible light.



posted on Aug, 31 2014 @ 07:17 PM
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originally posted by: MarioOnTheFly

Indeed you can't see the sun in visible light...because you see the light...not the sun. The space body itself is hidden behind light. A flashlight is the perfect example...already stated.

You see the light...but not the object radiating that light.

It can be seen tough in other light frequency spectrum, but not visible light.

No. Just like we can't see unencumbered visible light, other EM frequencies from the sun cannot be seen -- even buy instruments capable of detecting those frequencies -- unless those EM waves strike something.

Just like visible light, unless the EM radiation strikes something (such as reflecting off of an object), a device capable of seeing in -- say for example UV -- cannot see UV light unless it strikes something.

However, visible light CAN be seen when it strikes something, such as the light-sensitive cells in pour eyes. Similarly, UV light CAN be see by a device that sees UV light when that UV light strike the device's sensors.

But yeah -- we can't see visible light from the sun if it is just passing through space or clean air. However, contrary to what you said, other instruments also cannot see other parts of the EM spectrum from the sun if that EM wave is passing through empty space or clean air.


edit on 8/31/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 31 2014 @ 07:25 PM
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This thread is stupid. Everyone knows you can look at the Sun.

Also everyone knows that the world is flat. I mean how retarded can someone be to think that we're actually flying around on a ball. Has anyone fallen off? No.....



posted on Aug, 31 2014 @ 07:49 PM
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look up Eric Dollard for more



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 04:08 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: MarioOnTheFly

Indeed you can't see the sun in visible light...because you see the light...not the sun. The space body itself is hidden behind light. A flashlight is the perfect example...already stated.

You see the light...but not the object radiating that light.

It can be seen tough in other light frequency spectrum, but not visible light.

No. Just like we can't see unencumbered visible light, other EM frequencies from the sun cannot be seen -- even buy instruments capable of detecting those frequencies -- unless those EM waves strike something.

Just like visible light, unless the EM radiation strikes something (such as reflecting off of an object), a device capable of seeing in -- say for example UV -- cannot see UV light unless it strikes something.

However, visible light CAN be seen when it strikes something, such as the light-sensitive cells in pour eyes. Similarly, UV light CAN be see by a device that sees UV light when that UV light strike the device's sensors.

But yeah -- we can't see visible light from the sun if it is just passing through space or clean air. However, contrary to what you said, other instruments also cannot see other parts of the EM spectrum from the sun if that EM wave is passing through empty space or clean air.



I'm not sure what you are trying to say here. Light is seen when it enters a detector. No other interaction is needed. No atmosphere, nothing. Whether that detector is your eyes or a camera or a scientific instrument.

It is such a simple concept. If the light ray coincides with the detector then it is seen. If it doesn't then it isn't.

Now, this can EITHER happen by the light ray going straight from the source to the detector, as when you look at a lightbulb or the sun, OR when the light ray bounces off something else and then enters your eye, eg light scattered by the sky, or looking at the wall in a room lit by a bulb. If a light ray is passing across in front of you and doesn't strike anything to direct it into your eyes then you won't see it! How could you see it?

This applies whether you are on Earth, on Mars or in the vacuum of space. End of story.

The amount of confusion over this immensely simple principle makes me wonder whether I've passed into some strange science-free wormhole.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 05:26 AM
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People actually flagged this?

Do your eyes not contain matter that photons bounce off of?



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: Rob48

but let's continue with "nonsense".

So are you saying that you see the sun with your "visible light" sensors...eyes ?

Because I think you don't see the sun. You see the light...coming from the sun and hitting your retina.

Your sensors will always be blinded by the light, and you will only see the light.


I think this is what is meant by the OP's first sentence. Not that the sun is really "invisible"...as in cloacked or something. Think this is more of a philosophical question. "Sure I see the sun...it is shining in my eyes"...but exactly...you don't really see the sun. You are blinded by the glare of the sun, and are unable to really see the object...the source of the light.

Let's say we make an artificial light that shines in pitch black darkness directly towards you...would you be able, using only visible light sensors, detect what object is it that is shinning in your eyes ?

Honestly, I can't see anything wrong with that statement.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: GallopingFish

Wow thats pretty cool.

I had no idea. I cant wait to tell my kid.

Thanks for all this, DarknStormy you too.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: Rob48

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: MarioOnTheFly

Indeed you can't see the sun in visible light...because you see the light...not the sun. The space body itself is hidden behind light. A flashlight is the perfect example...already stated.

You see the light...but not the object radiating that light.

It can be seen tough in other light frequency spectrum, but not visible light.

No. Just like we can't see unencumbered visible light, other EM frequencies from the sun cannot be seen -- even buy instruments capable of detecting those frequencies -- unless those EM waves strike something.

Just like visible light, unless the EM radiation strikes something (such as reflecting off of an object), a device capable of seeing in -- say for example UV -- cannot see UV light unless it strikes something.

However, visible light CAN be seen when it strikes something, such as the light-sensitive cells in pour eyes. Similarly, UV light CAN be see by a device that sees UV light when that UV light strike the device's sensors.

But yeah -- we can't see visible light from the sun if it is just passing through space or clean air. However, contrary to what you said, other instruments also cannot see other parts of the EM spectrum from the sun if that EM wave is passing through empty space or clean air.



I'm not sure what you are trying to say here. Light is seen when it enters a detector. No other interaction is needed. No atmosphere, nothing. Whether that detector is your eyes or a camera or a scientific instrument.

It is such a simple concept. If the light ray coincides with the detector then it is seen. If it doesn't then it isn't.

Now, this can EITHER happen by the light ray going straight from the source to the detector, as when you look at a lightbulb or the sun, OR when the light ray bounces off something else and then enters your eye, eg light scattered by the sky, or looking at the wall in a room lit by a bulb. If a light ray is passing across in front of you and doesn't strike anything to direct it into your eyes then you won't see it! How could you see it?

This applies whether you are on Earth, on Mars or in the vacuum of space. End of story.

The amount of confusion over this immensely simple principle makes me wonder whether I've passed into some strange science-free wormhole.


I agree with you.

I'm just pointing out that we cannot see visible light as it passes through space -- or even as it passes through clean air. We can see visible light when it strikes the light-sensitive cells in our eyes, OR a light-sensing piece of equipment can "see" it when it strikes a light-sensor, such as a camera CCD -- or even when it strikes light-sensitive print film emulsion.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 11:08 AM
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Please note I'm going into all this with a knowledge that some light isn't visible even if it does strike our eyes the right way. Our eyes aren't equippped to see it. For example, when I go outside at night to look at the stars, there's a LOT I'm not seeing. If I could see all of the incoming light and cosmic rays, the night sky would light up like fireworks!

(and I'm not sure there're no stars that don't give off visible light. so i'm not sure there're no nearby (and bright) stars I cannot see when I look at them at night. I do know there're failed stars and dwarfs I cannot see.)

Here's an associated wiki article on what I'm trying to get across:
en.wikipedia.org - Visible spectrum...

And maybe this too is helpful (not sure):
www.madsci.org - Re: what percentage of the electromagnetic spectrum is visible light?...

Given my understanding of the sun and its physics is low, I for a few moments started to think the OP might be right, at least about the light it sends being invisible to the naked eye in space. It could make sense the light becomes visible when it scatters or penetrates our atmosphere. And I'm a science fiction buff! Of course, I hadn't yet thought about astronauts in space saying the sun is white, not yellow. How would they know it's white, if it's invisible? They'd have to see it through instruments.

Just saying it's not immediately obvious to a laymen the light from the sun is visible to the naked eye in space. It's obvious to us we see it on Earth, but who's been to space to see it? I haven't. I can't clearly rmember a moment whne a astronaut said they saw it with their naked eye in space.

And someone said who could they get images of the sun from probes in space if it was invisible? The OP said it's invisible to THE NAKED EYE, not to instruments on a probe. And most if not all of those images are false color. They're not images like you'd get from a standard camara. They're not what WE'D see. They actually add yellow to it too because it's popular.
edit on 1-9-2014 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 11:29 AM
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Raise your hand if you thought he was going to pee in the cup!
-Christosterone



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 11:43 AM
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originally posted by: MarioOnTheFly
So are you saying that you see the sun with your "visible light" sensors...eyes ?

Because I think you don't see the sun. You see the light...coming from the sun and hitting your retina.


This is true for all of the senses in general. You never actually experience an "external world" per se, you only see/hear/taste/etc. a mental representation that is formed exclusively inside of your brain by sensory input.

So in a very strict sense you don't see or hear anything outside of yourself really, you only see and hear and taste, touch, smell things inside of your brain. It's all just your brain trying to make sense of the stimuli that your nerves are delivering to it in one way or another.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 02:32 PM
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originally posted by: MarioOnTheFly
a reply to: Rob48

but let's continue with "nonsense".

So are you saying that you see the sun with your "visible light" sensors...eyes ?

Because I think you don't see the sun. You see the light...coming from the sun and hitting your retina.

Your sensors will always be blinded by the light, and you will only see the light.


I think this is what is meant by the OP's first sentence. Not that the sun is really "invisible"...as in cloacked or something. Think this is more of a philosophical question. "Sure I see the sun...it is shining in my eyes"...but exactly...you don't really see the sun. You are blinded by the glare of the sun, and are unable to really see the object...the source of the light.

Let's say we make an artificial light that shines in pitch black darkness directly towards you...would you be able, using only visible light sensors, detect what object is it that is shinning in your eyes ?

Honestly, I can't see anything wrong with that statement.



But the "electric universe" theory, which is what this is all really about, says that the sun actually emits some other kind of energy, which is only converted into visible light by the atmosphere. That is nonsense.

"Seeing an object" really means "seeing a light ray emanating from that object", whether that light is being emitted or reflected. The only thing you can actually see is light.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: MarioOnTheFly

So are you saying that you see the sun with your "visible light" sensors...eyes ?

Because I think you don't see the sun. You see the light...coming from the sun and hitting your retina.

Your sensors will always be blinded by the light, and you will only see the light.


The Sun is a ball of (mostly) hydrogen gas. The fusion of hydrogen into helium deep inside the center of the sun creates photons. Those photons are eventually emitted from the sun (after being absorbed and re-emitted by the stuff in the layers above the center). Those emitted photons that were originally caused by the fusion then strikes our eyes, and we see that as sunlight.

Therefore, what we see when we see sunlight is the fusion reactions of the Sun...i.e., when we see sunlight, we see the Sun.

What you seem to be saying is "we can't see the sun because the bright light coming from it obscures it". However, that bright light IS the Sun.


edit on 9/1/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: GallopingFish

So basically as soon as you escape the atmosphere its goes pitch black.. and if you are out in space looking around and accidentally look into the sun it will blind you and you wont know until you look back for something that reflects light which you probably wont be able to find because you are now blinded.



posted on Sep, 1 2014 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: Rob48

originally posted by: Rosinitiate
a reply to: Rob48

For starters....get a grip. Most of what was taught in science to many has become old hat and most people don't bother to study up on space science thereafter and certainly nothing around them encourages them do so anyway.


And yet people seem to waste hours watching ignorant rubbish on YouTube? What is encouraging them to do that? Maybe they could use the time to crack open a textbook or read a serious website instead. You know - learn something real?



Yes members on here should start watching TED rather than you tube!

TED TALKS



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

The Sun is a ball of (mostly) hydrogen gas. The fusion of hydrogen into helium deep inside the center of the sun creates photons. Those photons are eventually emitted from the sun (after being absorbed and re-emitted by the stuff in the layers above the center). Those emitted photons that were originally caused by the fusion then strikes our eyes, and we see that as sunlight.

Therefore, what we see when we see sunlight is the fusion reactions of the Sun...i.e., when we see sunlight, we see the Sun.

What you seem to be saying is "we can't see the sun because the bright light coming from it obscures it". However, that bright light IS the Sun.



Now there is no way to prove what is happening underneath the photosphere. This is speculation and theory, on all counts.

People should stop dogmatically following inside the sun information as a fact and regurgitating it as gospel. Its a theory.
edit on 2-9-2014 by GallopingFish because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 12:11 AM
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a reply to: GogoVicMorrow

Listen to Dollard, he is a very smart man.

If you look into a beam of gamma or microwave em waves. Im pretty sure your eyes wouldnt like it lol.

Its hard to find much info on the net surrounding this. TPTB must really wanna shut the idea down, as it would change mans perception of what the universe is.

Just remember everything under the photosphere is a theory.



posted on Sep, 2 2014 @ 12:17 AM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

If anyone can be bothered looking, I did another thread. The control of perception of space. It might help you see from another perspective



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