It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

MH370 missing (Part 2)

page: 20
39
<< 17  18  19    21  22  23 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 2 2014 @ 02:55 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

If it was heading in that direction it would have been over the Maldives at 08:15, the time they spotted the jet

There is two hour timezone difference between Malaysia and the Maldives.

But the fact that the aircraft tried to report something obviously must mean ACARS was not switched off, most likely it was the time at which the first engine stopped.




posted on May, 2 2014 @ 02:59 PM
link   
Acars itself can be shut off, but not completely. To completely shut it off requires a lot of work. That means that it's still going to try to do what it's supposed to do, but it won't be able to send anything.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 03:22 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

yes, the satcom terminal remains active and can be interrogated, hence the ping returns.
But let's say ACARS could still try to send something, it would have produced something every half hour while trying to send the engine data and who knows what more it should have been reporting every 30 minutes.

That is what makes this so odd, the relatives were told that the aircraft initiated the pings at 18:29 (there were three pings) and at 00:11.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 03:26 PM
link   
a reply to: earthling42

If the system were damaged, then it would try to ping as best it could. It may have suffered damage that knocked out the ACARS handshakes, and the EHMS went to a backup system. Or the aircraft monitor system was knocked out, but the EHMS being a separate system wasn't touched.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 04:54 PM
link   
a reply to: earthling42

Wasn't the stated the MAS ACARS used VHF not SAT.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 05:02 PM
link   
a reply to: roadgravel

As far as I heard, the Boeing AD didn't apply to them, because they didn't have the SATCOM antenna, so I would think it would have been VHF.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 06:06 PM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

You're just choosing to take your own subjective inference..

We can construct any theory we wish if we only account for facts selectively.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 06:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: earthling42
a reply to: Arbitrageur

No i don't think we should analize that, we know that it flew to BITOD as planned but in this (obviously early dated image) it shows a deviation from the original flight plan at, or just before reaching waypoint IGARI.
What are you basing that statement on? The point at the tip looks closer to BITOD than IGARI to me.

Have you got a more recent/ more accurate map?

Here are the maps I'm using to say the tip looks pretty close to BITOD, first map shows BITOD and second map shows the tip is pretty close to it and past IGARI:

club.pchome.net...





posted on May, 2 2014 @ 06:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: earthling42
a reply to: Arbitrageur

No i don't think we should analize that, we know that it flew to BITOD as planned but in this (obviously early dated image) it shows a deviation from the original flight plan at, or just before reaching waypoint IGARI.

If they wanted credibility, they should and could have posted the original radarplots which clearly shows the flight path of the aircraft.
The fact that this is not done and another plot only shows a supposed track of MH370 without the other traffic nearby indicates to me that they are merely producing images to fit their claims, and of course it matches because it is calculated.

Conclusion, they did not track MH370 with a military radar.


More importantly there is a Thales Raytheon GM400 radar at the Kuantan military airbase which has the range to observe targets beyond IGARI and this radar station never spotted MH370 turn back, therefore we can discount that it flew back at altitude.

The only reasonable inference from Kuantan failing to spot it is that it never turned back.

If it did not fly back at high altitude and if as Malaysia insisted it descended to 5,000ft and flew like a fighter plane to avoid radar detection then the airspeed would have been limited to 250 knots and such a return flight would have taken at least an hour.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 06:41 PM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

It is based on the time, 17:22

it takes another 5 minutes to reach BITOD which means it had reached BITOD at 17:27.

I do not think there is much difference but i am mainly using skyvector.

Edit: big difference

edit on 2-5-2014 by earthling42 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 06:49 PM
link   
a reply to: sy.gunson

Above Banda Atjeh Indonesia, the island Pulau We, there is a military radar in Sabang which also did not detect it


Edit:

If no military radar (besides the Malaysia-Thailand-Vietnam-China) had spotted the aircraft, that pretty much eliminates the a southern route over Indonesia because they have been checking their radars and came up with nothing.
The remaining possibility is west over Thailand and the Adaman islands.
edit on 2-5-2014 by earthling42 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 07:43 PM
link   
Does every one believe the sat connect data? If so then it couldn't have passed through the central Indian Ocean. But I have read they assumed a certain altitude and speed(s) which gives the area of possibility published.

Could there theory and work be far off?



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 09:53 PM
link   
a reply to: roadgravel

ACARS can communicate with the groundstation on VHF or SATCOM.
At 17:07 engine data was transmitted, the next update was supposed to be sent at 17:27 but that never happened, so during those 30 minutes a part of ACARS stopped working.
But the SATCOM terminal manufactured by Honeywell was still operative.
Maybe a pilot can answer this question if VHF/SATCOM are manually selected or automatically.
I think (but i can be proven wrong) that when it is to far from land it needs to be switched to SATCOM.

Skip the above, read about ACARS on this page




“It is Mas procedure to switch ACARS, VHF, and High Frequency selection off but this is only for flights to China as the service provider for Mas does not cover China. Some if not all pilots switch them all off for a while and then later switch SATCOMM back on to force the system into SATCOMM mode.”


edit on 2-5-2014 by earthling42 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:07 PM
link   


Governments and officials involved in the search have so far remained coy about the use of sensitive military intelligence to look for Flight 370. But as private companies prepare to enter the operation for the first time, more signs are emerging that military radar from multiple countries has played a key role in the search for weeks.

The person close to the matter said that Malaysia brokered an agreement between U.S. air-crash investigators and neighboring Asian countries in late March to allow for military radar to be discreetly shared with investigators.

The unique sharing arrangement involved Malaysia convincing regional neighbors to hand over military radar data to the U.S.'s National Transportation Safety Board that could then be analyzed by Boeing, the U.S.-based manufacturer of the missing 777-200 passenger aircraft, the person said. Boeing used the primary radar data to determine that the plane had traveled faster during the early part of its flight near Malaysia, which combined with aircraft performance models showed Flight 370 burned through fuel quicker and likely crashed into the sea earlier.

The sharing agreement happened shortly after the international panel of air-crash investigators was brought together by the Malaysian government on March 24.



So this is the answer why the northern path was excluded and the search area later on moved to another location.

WSJ

Edit:

Or perhaps not entirely sure that it went south...



KUALA LUMPUR - Three Bangladesh Navy ships are searching the Bay of Bengal for signs of aircraft debris.
Joint Agency Coordination Centre (JACC) head Angus Houston said the ships had found nothing so far.
"One of the ships has an echo sounder to ensure a thorough search of the area," he told reporters at a hotel here yesterday.


Aisaone

The peculiar thing is, there is no ship in that area


marinetraffic
edit on 2-5-2014 by earthling42 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 05:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: earthling42
a reply to: sy.gunson

Above Banda Atjeh Indonesia, the island Pulau We, there is a military radar in Sabang which also did not detect it


Edit:

If no military radar (besides the Malaysia-Thailand-Vietnam-China) had spotted the aircraft, that pretty much eliminates the a southern route over Indonesia because they have been checking their radars and came up with nothing. The remaining possibility is west over Thailand and the Adaman islands.


No that is not the only possibility.

Nobody has checked or even asked if it flew from Vietnam over the Sunda Straits.



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 07:26 AM
link   
a reply to: earthling42



Some if not all pilots switch them all off for a while


But that implies the reporting system won't use SATCOM because if it does then SOME flights are not routinely reporting based on pilot choice. Wouldn't that show that not reporting would not be an unusual circumstance.



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 07:46 AM
link   
Maybe we should all search for information about the military radars in that region and what has been said to the media in the first two weeks or so after the aircraft disappeared.



This picture shows it had returned, it flew over the Mallaca strait at 02:15 200 miles north-west of Penang.
It disappeared at 01:30 which indicates it was already past waypoint BITOD, possible position N7°37.98' E104°22.79'.
An aircraft that could have been MH370 was last spotted at 02:15 with a possible position N6°32.13' E98°11.03'.
The distance between the positions is about 411 nautical miles traveled within 45 minutes which seems quite impossible.
If the path (as has been claimed) is according to way points it is even more impossible.

The path i made in skyvector is similar as seen in the picture after i calculated the position at which it disappeared to make a path to the possible last spot above the Malacca strait.
This image could just be an early example which says nothing about the true flight path, but it does give us the time of disappearance and a possible position above the Malacca strait.

edit on 3-5-2014 by earthling42 because: (no reason given)


Sour ce
edit on 3-5-2014 by earthling42 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 07:58 AM
link   
a reply to: roadgravel

It only concerns MAS, and i agree, it could mean at some time data was not sent, and dispite that there was no indication something was wrong.
That indication came from HCM Vietnam when they contacted Malaysia to ask where MH370 was.
So this seems indeed to be happening, i agree



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 08:01 AM
link   
a reply to: earthling42

I don't recall the media reporting the turn to BITOD (east) and graphics never show it. Do you think that is odd or is that what reporting was become today? Wouldn't someone with a TV camera to talk to mention something like 'if it was going east, might it be east of that point'.

Seems so much is based on the Malaysia radar data that may not be reliable for this plane.



posted on May, 3 2014 @ 08:16 AM
link   
a reply to: roadgravel

Agreed, it was never mentioned so i think the fact that Vietnam reported that it was at BITOD when it disappeared from radar was quite a suprise for many people.
Only sy.gunson said it had passed BITOD, i have not seen others who had said the same.
So Sy, if you have sources, please share with us


Even in the report, dispite Vietnam says otherwise, the maps show a turn at IGARI, that is why i mentioned that we should probably not analyze it

edit on 3-5-2014 by earthling42 because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
39
<< 17  18  19    21  22  23 >>

log in

join