It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Fear and Paranormal - Connection - How to willingly control Adrenaline?

page: 1
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:19 PM
link   
So after having had many paranormal events myself, I noticed whenever I saw something undeniable, like the whole room in red even though it was pitch black with the blanket flying, I also had a high heartbeat. As it increased, the effects I saw and heard often became more intense, even when passively sitting there for a while. This often happened in the middle of sleeping, waking me up. Also when going through experiences of others I noticed that similar events nearly always had fear involved.

So what is fear?
As with most lost senses, media manipulation is a big deal here. Connecting the adrenaline function usable for situations where you have to be faster to an illusion called fear, connected to events the subject is supposed to be afraid of.

So if we wanted to see the invisible or perhaps whatever illusion we perceive there, we might be able to do it again if we cause ourselves to have fear = adrenaline + the illusion of there being something life threatening, increasing the adrenaline even more. However, the fear many of us have causes us to create wrong interpretations of what we see and makes us hide from it.

How to activate adrenaline?
This is my problem after mainly having overcome fear.
All I know is the 2nd Chakra (an organ or energy place below the navel) is said to be in control of it. Any attempt to create something like fear or know reasons where adrenaline would be helpful in nature failed.
Perhaps someone else has an idea.

What does adrenaline do?
Your perception seems to slow things around you down. You basically have more ability to analyze and move. Your strongest magnetic field also sends out waves much faster, which are reflected back to you. If there was something too small or fast to see, you might be more likely able to do so.
Warning: Adrenaline / Fear damages your body and can cause you to cough blood when used for too long. If you run to your doctor after this and he diagnoses lung cancer, do not blindly believe him!
edit on 16-4-2014 by oneoneone because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:40 PM
link   
One can argue adrenaline and fear are one in the same. It all comes down to survival, if your in a situation that is potentially dangerous to your life your brain sort of goes on "overdrive" to help you survive, hense increased hearing, sight, and faster reaction times. That's what I think at least.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:44 PM
link   
reply to post by Shepard64
 


They are not the same.
Fear is an emotion while adrenaline is a hormone and a neurotransmitter. But, fear can be a trigger for adrenaline to activate and do it's thing. I can guarantee you that adrenaline is not damaging your body in any way.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:45 PM
link   
reply to post by Nikola014
 


Ya I thought it was a stretch but I like your explanation a lot better



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:52 PM
link   
reply to post by oneoneone
 

I dont seem to see you understanding we need adrenaline to function throughout our lives. Whereas to try and regulate it...say under duress may be a good thing...we need it to do what it does and when it does as a body function for homeostasis(the body's ability to maintain itself), as a hormone and a neurotransmitter. Both are vitally important day to day, both naturally and as a medication.

Some points you havent addressed: c/o the American Medical Association, the Emergency Management Institute and Wikipedia among a few of my notes from Med school.

*Adrenaline, adrenalin, or 4,5-β-trihydroxy-N-methylphenethylamine) is a hormone and a neurotransmitter.

*Adrenaline is used to treat a number of conditions including: cardiac arrest, anaphylaxis, and superficial bleeding.[50] It has been used historically for bronchospasm and hypoglycemia

*Adrenaline is used as a drug to treat cardiac arrest and other cardiac dysrhythmias resulting in diminished or absent cardiac output

*Adrenaline is the drug of choice for treating anaphylaxis.

*Adrenaline is also used as a bronchodilator for asthma

*Adrenaline is added to injectable forms of a number of local anesthetics, such as bupivacaine and lidocaine, as a vasoconstrictor to slow the absorption and, therefore, prolong the action of the anesthetic agent.

*Adverse reactions to adrenaline include palpitations, tachycardia, arrhythmia, anxiety, panic attack, headache, tremor, hypertension, and acute pulmonary edema
can produce retrograde enhancement of long-term memory in humans.

*The major physiologic triggers of adrenaline release center upon stresses, such as physical threat, excitement, noise, bright lights, and high ambient temperature. All of these stimuli are processed in the central nervous system

*Adrenaline Junkies- The "high" is caused by self-inducing a fight-or-flight response by intentionally engaging in stressful or risky behavior, which causes a release of epinephrine by the adrenal gland. Adrenaline junkies appear to favor stressful activities for the release of epinephrine as a stress response.

edit on 09-22-2013 by mysterioustranger because: spl

edit on 09-22-2013 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:57 PM
link   

Shepard64
It all comes down to survival, if your in a situation that is potentially dangerous to your life your brain sort of goes on "overdrive" to help you survive, hense increased hearing, sight, and faster reaction times. That's what I think at least.


Though, some situations not related to survival: reading the newspaper, holding a presentation, playing a computer game.
An illusion is an imagery misleading too far from the situations in which it should be of most use, if it is really controlled by your brain.

Normally taking things too literally isn't efficient to do, though detailed analysis seems helpful here to find out how to control it.
edit on 16-4-2014 by oneoneone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 04:31 PM
link   
reply to post by mysterioustranger
 


Thank you very much for adding so many references/clues!

So if I interpreted it right, according to official medicine, adrenaline is an information or mass of something that is already present in all or other situations and can also be controlled artificially by medicaments.

You've also lead me to see that stress can be related to adrenaline, perhaps similar to fear, or as alternative or half or fully sharing trigger for adrenaline increase.
I would suspect stress is, similar to fear, a partial illusion, however also has by a partially shared definition a claimed/sometimes labeled poison flowing into your body in "stress" situations.
Though, the shared definition might be small. Leading to the main definitions a) annoyed situation -> poison b) speedy stress -> movements and thoughts similar to hyperventilation as trigger of itself, similar to fear.

Though, by knowledge of the brain I would deny the official poison theory, because what seems to happen in related situations is that general understanding is destroyed by being forced to do non useful actions, for example by being forced to write a text for college/school. The stress feeling would thereby be the feeling of not finding usable brain connections.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 04:33 PM
link   
reply to post by oneoneone
 


As luxurious as it may seem to be able to shut down the normal fight or flight response, it is not beneficial overall. Contrary to Nikola's statement that it doesn't harm the body, sustained adrenaline exposure has been shown to damage the hippocampus and messes up reception of other neurotransmitters.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 04:42 PM
link   
reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


Like every part of human body, there can be a disfunction of adrenaline( hypoadrenalism and hyperadrenalism ), and then we can say that it can have a negative effects on our bodies.

But generally speaking, if the adrenaline is functioning normally, it does not have negative effects on a human body.

This is just my intermediate medical knowledge. I could be very much wrong, but I don't think this is the case.
edit on 16-4-2014 by Nikola014 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 04:42 PM
link   
reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


Yes, it seems obvious that it has some damaging effects to have high adrenaline making you fast.

But the automatic controlling we have now is flawed, so it would be useful to not have adrenaline passing in when you hold a presentation or are "afraid". The illusion also keeps you away from things that you could normally learn of.
Then there are some situations in which you can make use of it, but it doesn't trigger. When you know you have to be very fast to survive something or do something affecting the future of you or many others.

Though, when there is something sudden to happen to you, your own understanding would be too slow.
I managed to take control of my pain system in agreement to take care of my body on my own, but my slow reaction when hurt is the negative effect. A half automated system is the goal, or the means to modify your subconscious in that area or to properly connect it with the other parts of your brain.
edit on 16-4-2014 by oneoneone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 04:49 PM
link   
reply to post by oneoneone
 


Just because one does it feel it doesn't mean that it still does not take a toll. I have an extraordinarily high pain threshhold and an inhibited adrenaline response. In some ways, I'm really pretty amazing in a crisis situation. However, the internalization of this stuff has very negative effects on my body including autoimmune disorder and a tendency towards injury and infection. In a way, I'm like a leper except my bits don't fall off.

My point is controlling the normal body responses to pain or fear have their downsides.
edit on 16/4/14 by WhiteAlice because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:01 PM
link   
What I heard of high adrenaline, the medicinal way, would be the overuse of the lung extraction of air, thereby damaging the lung bubbles. The increased air extraction would then reach the heart to increase it's beat and thereby the flow speed of distribution. The muscles and generally the body would then be overused, taking extra damage.

Though, we are a bit off topic.
We will also use the term of adrenaline to describe the adrenaline effect similar to what I described in this post, however can see from that if someone took into consideration that it might not be something only present in the body when fear or anything takes place, where it is relevant.
edit on 16-4-2014 by oneoneone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:02 PM
link   
I'm not sure what your point is here, but if it is to "control fear" and about adrenaline, I have a situation to explain how I managed to do it. It was very instructive to me and could be applied to other situations. If I have erred in discerning your issue I apologize in advance. Just disregard.

You see my dog up there. Moses has passed away now, but I used to take him on daily walks. One day I was quite surprised to be accosted by a very large dog who wanted to take out my cocker spaniel and perhaps me, too, along with him. The adrenaline kicked in and darn near paralyzed me. I could barely haul in the leash, put myself between the aggressive dog and mine, and get the dog to back off. I was as frightened as I have ever been and my hands and arms were shaking badly. I had no weapon with which to defend myself, an excited dog, and blood was draining from my brain to my limbs. That's the design and what is supposed to happen.

After that experience I decided I had to protect myself and my dog from that ever happening again. I got some Mace, but also I practiced what I would do in my head over and over. The whole idea was to "conquer the fear" by knowing what to do in advance to the point that I would not waste time dithering in indecision. There's not much time when this sort of thing happens, so you can't afford to waste it. So I worked out a plan.

1. Haul the leash back. Shorten it. Protect my dog first.
2. Dog behind me with left hand. Mace out with right hand.
3. Steady my aim. Do not shake.
4. Stare down the dog. Do not look away.
5. Refrain from firing if at all possible.
6. If the dog attacks, fire.

Sure enough, one day a great big dog came out from behind a parked car so I couldn't see him and decided the public street was his territory. 1-2-3-4-5-6, and I fired. The dog ran off, and so did I. Later on I talked with the owner who was very angry at me, but the fact is I had the right to defend myself on public property and I conformed to the local dog ordinance which specified just this situation. Myself and my dog on a leash versus an uncontrolled dog attacking is specifically addressed. I told him to take me to court of he wanted, but, of course, he didn't do it.

Now you can go ahead and take the "poor big dog got Maced" approach; how cruel, and we can argue about it, but this isn't really about that aspect. It's about how to act while under adrenaline stress. How can you even function when your body is telling you to run or fight, and how can you fight a big dog who is capable of maiming you? And how do you do all this when your own dog is frightened and not under as much control as you would like?

The point that I learned was how to focus my energy when under this kind of overwhelming stress, how to work through the adrenaline and maintain control. Now it's one thing to say, "Well, just maintain control" in a situation you have practiced, but quite another to do it in a new unplanned scenario, but I still think this basic training can be helpful and applied in a time of need. Work out a generic plan ahead of time.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:05 PM
link   
reply to post by oneoneone
 


Hey, your welcome! It is an essential part of the bodies natural functions. But like anything else...its can get whacked out at time, and causes issues.

If you get into studying this theory of yours over time...I'd be glad to learn a few things you discover!



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:09 PM
link   
reply to post by schuyler
 


Yes, that's how I handled the problem for presentations and applications.
Planning ahead with knowing how you will be able to act under adrenaline influence.


mysterioustranger
If you get into studying this theory of yours over time...I'd be glad to learn a few things you discover!

Alright, I will PM you if I remember to.
If it's about the invisible, you might want to ask as well.
edit on 16-4-2014 by oneoneone because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:49 PM
link   
I almost can control my fear, i can't in extreme situations, like someone trying to kill me or stalking me (or maybe a very creepy thing), but i can be with and without fear when I want. I concentred me while reading now i'm with fear xD


Hey, I want to start with these chackra things, (sorry for using thing, i don't know other word to express myself) from where I start?
edit on 4~16~2014 by Aeboro because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 06:34 PM
link   
reply to post by Nikola014
 


Yes, in normal circumstances, it should not have an effect. However, what the OP is proposing is not normal and is trying to willfully control an automatic process. That's where it becomes abnormal.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 07:49 PM
link   
reply to post by oneoneone
 




All I know is the 2nd Chakra (an organ or energy place below the navel) is said to be in control of it. Any attempt to create something like fear or know reasons where adrenaline would be helpful in nature failed.
Perhaps someone else has an idea.


How about a good disaster movie?



Always a happy ending...





So if we wanted to see the invisible or perhaps whatever illusion we perceive there, we might be able to do it again if we cause ourselves to have fear = adrenaline + the illusion of there being something life threatening, increasing the adrenaline even more.


Hmmm 2012 in widescreenHD 3D perhaps?

edit on 16-4-2014 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 08:06 PM
link   
reply to post by oneoneone
 




This is my problem after mainly having overcome fear.


I am not sure I understand what you are trying to discuss or what you are after when I read your post but it is probably my fault but will like you to answer a few questions and maybe have you clarify so I understand better.

1 Are you in a state where there is no fear anymore with extreme knowledge within that nothing can truelly harm you?
2 Have you gone thru a amygdala fear overload or is this what you are attempting to create with 2nd chakra manipulation?
3 Am I getting you right that you want more adrenaline to speed up responses that are very slow since you are to0 calm?
4 What "symptoms" do you have when you are playing around with your chakras? (for instance energy flows/root burn/nerves being oversensitive/the calmness/the bliss/11:11 synchronicity/limited synchronous telepathy/chakra coloring)
edit on 16-4-2014 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 08:10 PM
link   

Shepard64
One can argue adrenaline and fear are one in the same. It all comes down to survival, if your in a situation that is potentially dangerous to your life your brain sort of goes on "overdrive" to help you survive, hense increased hearing, sight, and faster reaction times. That's what I think at least.


Body overdrive I agree but probably the opposite for clarity of thought.




top topics



 
3
<<   2 >>

log in

join