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Passing Trauma Symptoms Through Generations

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posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 08:47 AM
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I was just reading this article and thought it might be of interest.
I also thought it's finding may produce a starting point from which many of man's current behaviors could be explained.



A group of European researchers have discovered that early life traumatic events can alter a non-genetic mechanism governing gene expression in the sperm cells of adult mice. And they think that this finding, published today in Nature Neuroscience, explains why the offspring of these mice exhibit the same depressive-like behaviors that their parents do.


[www.theverge.com...]




Under normal circumstances, she says, microRNAs regulate gene expression. But the trauma that these mice experienced resulted in the over-expression of microRNAs in the brain and an abnormal dip the production of certain proteins. "This," Mansuy says, "makes animals do things wrong."





When researchers looked at the sperm of the traumatized mice, they discovered that the microRNAs in these sperm cells were also present in abnormally high numbers. "This means that germ cells — sperm in males and oocytes in females — are very sensitive to environmental conditions in early life," Mansuy says, "and early childhood trauma has consequences not only for the brain but also for the germ cell line."


I can't help but wonder what a study of the line of decendants from European childern and WWI veterans might reveal.
Does anyone think a case could be made for "a change in behavior being passed down" from those exposed to war through their childern and it's effects on our current society.
If such a connection could be shown, just think of the results a "never ending war on terror" may have in the future.
edit on 16-4-2014 by teamcommander because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 09:47 AM
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The results are fascinating.....the possibilities are endless horror for us as well......
The future is one thing , but this concept goes a long way in explaining the present.....
The inhumanity we show our fellow humans so casually may be a growing consequence of the past traumas we have endured as a species,,,,,,where will it go from here?And how the hell can we arrest its progress...?



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by stirling
 


Yes, when I first read this article I could not help but remember what so many have said about this "war on terror".

"We are making more terrorist faster than we can kill them."

I only hope someone will notice this corrolation and find a way to stop the insanity.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 10:28 AM
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reply to post by teamcommander
 



Does anyone think a case could be made for "a change in behavior being passed down" from those exposed to war through their childern and it's effects on our current society.
If such a connection could be shown, just think of the results a "never ending war on terror" may have in the future. - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...

Yep!

Depression, anxiety and familial dysfunction are definitely inherited. The children of the war on terror are permanently damaged. Not only will their offspring be hyperattentive to stimulation/fear, but the parenting bestowed on those kids will be compromised as well.

It's been known for decades that the brain of a newborn is open to ANY set of circumstances; and will adapt to whatever occurs. A baby born in the Australian Outback will face much different threats than a suburban baby in a nice, clean neighborhood, and both will face different threats than a baby born in a wartorn ruin.

Placental hormone exchanges are also known to impact babies during gestation - a stressed mother will produce a child who has built-in radar for stress, and experiences it as more devastating than a baby whose mother was calm and relaxed.

The kids that survive the wars in the Middle East, who have seen their families killed, been trained as soldiers, taught all their lives to fear/hate 'the enemy', will never be able to let go of those learned responses to perceived or real threats.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by teamcommander
 


That is really interesting. Some anecdotal observations on the WWII vet and children relationship. My mother was actually conceived within a month after my grandfather returned to the US after being a POW (his bomber had been shot down). In fact, the timing was so close that we both counted the months that he'd been back to make sure he actually was her father, lol. Her sibling came 3 years later. Between the two of them, the latter is infinitely more laid back and "normal". My mother is a freaking paranoid lunatic. If the stress and trauma was influencing and damaging the sperm at that time, it could explain her very divergent behavior from the norm of the family.

Like I said, purely anecdotal but it could answer some of the question as to why my uncle grew up in the same household but turned out so drastically different from my mother.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:24 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


I understand what you are saying.
We did a search of our ancestery several years ago and found a long history of knights
and such in every generation. I had noticed before a "tendancy" toward agreesion kind of ran in the family.
One thing I can personally say is how much "at home" I felt while in the military and even "enjoyed" combat.
edit on 16-4-2014 by teamcommander because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by teamcommander
 


We have a very long history of military service as well on that branch stretching back to the 15th century and an ancestor who was part of Henry Tudor's bodyguard who slew Richard III, which apparently was a very brutal affair (his helm was embedded into his skull). That branch served in every war since until my mother's generation where everything went really wonky. The whole branch is potentially subject to medical disqualification due to hemophilia these days (I'm a rare female hemophiliac myself--go figure). Apparently nature doesn't want us fighting anymore, lol.



posted on Apr, 17 2014 @ 08:19 AM
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I once mentioned that I faint at the sight of blood to a doctor and that my dad and cousin also have that reaction. The doctor then asked me whether "I had any ancestors who fought in war". I replied yes as my great grandfather served in Gallipoli in WWI. He then asked whether he was injured which he was; shot 5 times in the stomach and was sent to a hospital ship.

He said 'that would explain why you faint at blood".

I wish I had asked him to elaborate, but I guess it's all in the genes...



posted on Apr, 17 2014 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


Like I said, our family tree goes back to sixth century Norway and is filled with fighters.
It even shows up at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. William gave lands to his nephew in Northeast England, I would guess to keep him as far away as possible.
We then came to this land in 1653 and have been in every fist fight, schermish, and war we could drum up since then.



posted on Apr, 17 2014 @ 09:01 AM
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reply to post by Kalixi
 


I had never thought of anything like this.
Maybe it helps explain why my daughters are not squimish about blood or bugs or any of the things many "normal" girls are.
The more I think about this subject the scarrier things get.
edit on 17-4-2014 by teamcommander because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-4-2014 by teamcommander because: (no reason given)



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