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PHOTOS: This Groundbreaking 3D Printer Built 10 Homes in 24 Hours

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posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:23 AM
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But in Shanghai, WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co. has been using a monstrous printing device to build homes at a breakneck pace — 10 homes in 24 hours.


Ok, so theres goes the construction industry. I guess as technology evolves we really need to consider better social programs.


The best part is the houses are super cheap to make and they’re made almost entirely of construction and other industrial waste.


Cheap, AND uses industrial waste! Wonderful!

Anyone see anything wrong with this?

Source

PS- Not the best looking homes but im sure there will be improvements.


edit on 4/16/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:30 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Wow printing everything from houses to livers and hearts, this printing technology will change the world!



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by LDragonFire
 


It wont work because everyone is so focused on making everyone around them work hard that they forgot theres actually things to do in the world like create music, and art, and practice meditation.

To bad, these poor fools want to do what they want instead of work hard even though we have enough technology in the world since probably the 80's to do everything we need done.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:48 AM
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Ah.....since they printed an entire 45 government model out of stainless steel...I have felt that theres gonna be no limit on this printing technology!
This is a major breakthrough....



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:03 AM
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Well....... There goes my job I guess.
Technology is wonderful, but often seems overrated to me. A lot of my job market(residential construction) has been taken over by modular homes. They are a lot cheaper, but you get what you pay for really. I am biased of course, but I have seen modulars being built and feel they are not as solid as a house with a solid foundation, and proper framing.
edit on Wed, 16 Apr 2014 01:10:12 -0500 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:14 AM
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reply to post by TKDRL
 


They aren't printed onsite yet ... this is no different to prefab wooden walls ... they will still need somebody to transport and erect them onsite.

But in the long run ... yeah these things will be build by robots!

We will all have to think about retraining ... the question is retrain for what?

What jobs done by humans are indispensable for the future???



edit on 16/4/2014 by DietJoke because: Eduted to swap 'is' for 'are'.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by DietJoke
 





What jobs done by humans is indispensable for the future???


Why must we all work!

We can almost supply everything now!

Bring in the 16 hour week.

Let's have some serious leisure time.

P

edit on 16/4/2014 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:30 AM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


Well we could go the whole hog and go a Matrix like reality where we supply heat energy for the robots and they literally take care of everything else down to the waste disposal we require , whilst we live in some fantasy land online.

There is always give and take required.

The question is what roles will we fulfill and what roles can't be done without?



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:43 AM
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Hnmm, industrial waste as a the building material.

What could possibly go wrong other than hideous pollution, birth deformities, cancer clusters as these houses break down on the environment.

Eco friendly - yeah right
edit on 16-4-2014 by markosity1973 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 02:52 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


LOL...you're so right about the "work hard" mantra that's being beat into everyone's heads, despite the fact it's becoming increasingly difficult to actually get a job to work hard at.

I probably figured out around 12 years old that working hard wasn't all it was cracked up to be. My mother was very keen on hard work being wholesome and the path to success, yet I looked around at all of the the hard working people that were family and friends and they really weren't on the road to success and the dreams of wealth promised by hard work were probably going to stay as dreams unless they won the lottery.

I also observed that rich people didn't like hard work either since they got other people to do their work for them. In essence they were about as lazy as the poor man who didn't work - they were just luckier and better at thinking of ways to make money by making OTHERS work hard.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:03 AM
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EveStreet
reply to post by onequestion
 


LOL...you're so right about the "work hard" mantra that's being beat into everyone's heads, despite the fact it's becoming increasingly difficult to actually get a job to work hard at.

I probably figured out around 12 years old that working hard wasn't all it was cracked up to be. My mother was very keen on hard work being wholesome and the path to success, yet I looked around at all of the the hard working people that were family and friends and they really weren't on the road to success and the dreams of wealth promised by hard work were probably going to stay as dreams unless they won the lottery.

I also observed that rich people didn't like hard work either since they got other people to do their work for them. In essence they were about as lazy as the poor man who didn't work - they were just luckier and better at thinking of ways to make money by making OTHERS work hard.







Really......I am willing to bet you are under 30. Is it any wonder so many young people can not even leave the nest anymore. If you do not work hard you will always be at the mercy of others like a parasite.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 03:50 AM
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SubTruth

EveStreet
reply to post by onequestion
 


LOL...you're so right about the "work hard" mantra that's being beat into everyone's heads, despite the fact it's becoming increasingly difficult to actually get a job to work hard at.

I probably figured out around 12 years old that working hard wasn't all it was cracked up to be. My mother was very keen on hard work being wholesome and the path to success, yet I looked around at all of the the hard working people that were family and friends and they really weren't on the road to success and the dreams of wealth promised by hard work were probably going to stay as dreams unless they won the lottery.

I also observed that rich people didn't like hard work either since they got other people to do their work for them. In essence they were about as lazy as the poor man who didn't work - they were just luckier and better at thinking of ways to make money by making OTHERS work hard.







Really......I am willing to bet you are under 30. Is it any wonder so many young people can not even leave the nest anymore. If you do not work hard you will always be at the mercy of others like a parasite.


I'm over 30... and I havent met anyone over 30 that didnt prefer leisure over work. Are going to be the first one to tell me that you love to work? Really? If you are, just reply with a simple .

Work and jobs are a necessity... not something humans do because we want to.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 04:01 AM
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TKDRL
Well....... There goes my job I guess.
Technology is wonderful, but often seems overrated to me. A lot of my job market(residential construction) has been taken over by modular homes. They are a lot cheaper, but you get what you pay for really. I am biased of course, but I have seen modulars being built and feel they are not as solid as a house with a solid foundation, and proper framing.


Ya know, it's funny.. I know a guy from Bosnia that lived here for a time. He laughed at all of our houses being made of wooden frames - this came up in conversation during hurricane Katrina. He's dead set against it and he has a good point.. I'll tell you.. When he was ready to build a house all the family pitched in and they made a house in like a month that is like all of their other houses.. houses they pass down for generations - for hundreds of years. These houses are super cheap compared to ours in the US.

The secret?

The house is built out of concrete and stone - the entire house cept where they have to put in windows and doors which are easily replaced. His house would never be destroyed by fire or flood or termites etc. His house would be super insulated winter or summer. He could not understand for the life of him, why Americans were so stupid as to build a house with such feeble materials.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 04:27 AM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


His house is toast should a minor earthquake happen, mine would still be standing

There are a lot of good reasons to build either way really. I would be interested in seeing which costs more. If I could afforded it, I would have used metal framing personally.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:12 AM
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Fascinating technology, thank you for sharing. I must admit that I was biased before reading the article by previous responders, but now, am quite excited about the possibilities. As far as earthquake fears, I would imagine that one's choice of foundation would resolve those concerns. True, cookie cutter neighborhoods for the poor seems depressing, but I know from experience that it is better than being homeless. Also, think it is a good use for waste cement products. I believe I would consider one of these homes over our current day wooden frame modular homes. I have a brick and concrete home now, Less maintenance!

My first consideration though was the strength and integrity of flooring...most concrete or cement structures use metal rebar, so curious about the design specs on these homes? Wonder what they use to connect or secure the sections together?



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 05:45 AM
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CynConcepts

Also, think it is a good use for waste cement products.



They are not using waste cement per se. Think of cement as glue; in traditional every day concrete, it is mixed with water, gravel and sand to make the final product of concrete.

They are substituting gravel and sand with god knows what to make a new type of concrete. One could add all sorts of nasties so long as it's solid.

Industrial waste becomes industrial waste for a reason - it's unusable and very often toxic to humans. This new idea is a classic trojan horse. 'Let's build cheap homes for the poor' they say 'look at how cheaply we can do it' they say. What people dont realise is that these homes will be a way for big industry to sell and poison people with their rubbish that they once had to pay to get rid of.
edit on 16-4-2014 by markosity1973 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 07:29 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Aye more plastics to decorate the environment, all hail technology. Oh wait, who cares about that? Its about comfort for # sake! People never learns. They will soon though at a price they wont expect.
edit on 16-4-2014 by _damon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by SubTruth
 


Nope, not under 30 and I have actually given my all at every job I've had, even if they were soul sucking, mind insulting jobs because I really don't like to fail at anything and I need to support myself. Also, nothing was just handed to me since my father's lifelong job (working hard) suddenly became obsolete in the early 80's. No gift of a car nor a free ride to college though that may have been possible if his job was not made obsolete due to imports.

The point that I was trying to make was that working hard does NOT guarantee that you will be a success or get rich. There was a time not so long ago in the US when you could work hard at a blue collar job and maybe you wouldn't get rich but a family could live comfortably on one income and afford a decent home, decent car, and some vacations - and live virtually debt free. That is becoming just a pleasant daydream for most since decent paying jobs with chance for advancement are scarce due to globalization yet the cost of living is skyrocketing.

A lot of people are waking up to the fact that no matter how hard they work or gain an education - the odds are stacked against them. How many have worked hard at jobs for 20 years and then are laid off because of outsourcing or restructuring? There are no pensions, 401Ks are unstable, SS is doubtful, education costs are through the roof, and advancing within a company is more difficult than ever. It's all shaky ground. When you present people with a game they can't win, they give up trying to play the game at all.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 08:37 AM
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reply to post by markosity1973
 



The article did not specify the specific mix, but after doing a little research I found a very informative PDF called UTILIZATION OF RECYCLED AND WASTE MATERIALS IN VARIOUS CONSTRUCTION APPLICATIONS 
Read it here for more details.

The focus was on applicable waste and recycling materials within four sectors, namely, Composite Waste, Industrial Sector Waste, Municipal Sector Waste and Transportation Sector Waste. Included is a comprehensive review of data, information, findings (including benefits/advantages) and evidences relative to recycling waste materials and construction applications. Each sector includes subsections of recyclable materials in relation to the construction industry.

They even address specifically which wastes are used as aggregate for concrete. True, the idea that a house may have recycled sewage sludge or swine manure within its walls, makes one perceive it as 'yucky'. Also, true, that one would have to trust that the materials have been properly processed. That naturally is the biggest obstacle to overcome, especially for most ATS'ers!
edit on 4 16 2014 by CynConcepts because: Clarification



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 09:43 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Waaay back in the 1970's, I worked in a plant which produced 14 complete houses in an 8 hr. shift.
We did this six days a week, from raw materials like wood and sheet rock. Very little plastics.
They hauled off only one dump truck load of waste per week from this plant



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