It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A Second Source of Light detected by the Rover. Curiosity Sol 568.

page: 4
82
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 08:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Arken
 


Kind of strange the way these "cosmic rays" always show up on the edge of the horizon.




posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 08:34 PM
link   



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 09:34 PM
link   
Wow, great find again Arken. Please go on and look at those images and show them to us. Respect my man.



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 09:50 PM
link   

KnightLight
reply to post by Arken
 


Did anyone ask about the picture with the mountains in the back? AS in how would a cosmic ray go through them to hit the camera lens? I would think there would be lights coming in OVER the horizon if they were cosmic in nature, but maybe I am crazy.

Maybe not crazy, just mistaken about the way cosmic rays strike the detector. They don't "hit the camera lens". They go straight through the body of the camera and through the CCD (sensor), liberating electrons in a few pixels as they go, which show up as a white dot or streak.

In other words, they could have come from any direction other than through the planet itself — the back of the camera, the top of the camera, the sides of the camera or the front of the camera.

The position of a cosmic ray streak on the image bears no relation to which way the ray came from — only which bit of the sensor it hit.



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 10:27 PM
link   
I suspect also that the first demotivation.me... joke of humor



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 10:57 PM
link   
reply to post by Arken
 


Why did you intentionally leave the second picture out of your post?



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 11:07 PM
link   
I think what I find most interesting is this:

The "light"

Right Nav Cam

Keeps showing up:

Right Nav Cam

In only the RIGHT nav cam....

Right Nav Cam

Never in the left nav cam on images taken at the same time.......

Think about that for a minute.

Three separate images. All three have the "light" and all three are from the RIGHT nav cam.

Can anyone show this happening in the LEFT nav cam? Both cams?

Mast cam?

If there is something actually there.....and very brief to where only one camera is going to capture it.........why is it always the right nav cam?

I'm actually hoping someone spots a 4th image.....because if they do.....and it is STILL the RIGHT camera ONLY capturing it.....

I would hope that little detail would make someone stop and think for a moment.......



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 11:33 PM
link   
I think the only valid question that can come from this thread is; are cosmic strikes increasing, and how can that affect us.

The sun actually protects our entire planetary system from cosmic strikes. Sure some gets through, but most are deflected.

As the suns enters weaker periods like now, we see more cosmic strikes. This in turn creates more clouds. Clouds mean colder temperatures and more powerful storms. If the sun is at a grand point in its cycle we could actually see a mini ice age.

Your image isn't a light source though. Just a coincidental cosmic strike on the camera's private bits.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:29 AM
link   
Are there any , even minute, differences between the left and right CAM? or are they mirrored in ALL capabilites?



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:42 AM
link   
There have been craft on Mars for many years, sending back thousands of pictures, and we're just now seeing light sources on the surface. I would say that some intelligent species is visiting at this time. Cosmic ray strikes would have been a constant since the beginning of our explorations there and would have been seen before 2014...right?



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:00 AM
link   
Since it appears only in the right side camera pictures ...

... could it be targeted by a martian laser





posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:15 AM
link   

Phage
reply to post by openminded2011
 

They don't
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Hello phage first off I'm not saying you are wrong I have seen your input on this site over the years and I wouldn't have a chance at arguing whether you are right and wrong. My question is, I looked at the photos that were on that link. Can you tell me why some cosmic rays come across as a clear defined line while others seem to be a bit blury hope that makes sense



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:22 AM
link   
reply to post by ipfreely32
 


never mind, found good pdf on the specs.

www-robotics.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:30 AM
link   
reply to post by ThePeaceMaker
 


lol, asking a guy who still thinks we went to the moon? ;-)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:32 AM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Perhaps it's cosmic rays that you are seeing when you are looking at "the flag on the moon".



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:34 AM
link   
reply to post by ThePeaceMaker
 

There are several things at work.

1) The angle at which the particle strikes the CCD sensor. This determines how long the streak will be. The more oblique the angle, the longer the streak, depending also upon:

2) The energy level of the particle. This determines how many pixels surrounding the pixels through which the particle passes will be affected as well as how long a streak may be. The energy of a very high energy particle will "overflow" into adjacent pixels.

3) The images we are seeing are not raw images directly from the instruments. They have been subjected to jpeg data compression. The compression algorithm itself can produce artifacts by sort of "blending" neighboring pixels together.

edit on 4/16/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:41 AM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Where are you getting your data from? Please provide link(s).

Sorry, but it's hard to seriously take any info from (assuming) a grown man who uses a dr. who avatar.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:46 AM
link   
Couldn't it have something to do with lightning? Maybe a storm on mars... Idk...



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:47 AM
link   
reply to post by ipfreely32
 


I get the feeling nothing linked will be good enough for you...

qsimaging.com...



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:56 AM
link   
reply to post by ipfreely32
 

1)

Occassionally the particle will be passing through at a shallow angle to the plane of the CCD and affect a number of pixels along its path creating a bright streak.
source

2)

What happens when a bucket fills up to the brim with water? It overflows. The same thing happens in CCDs. A pixel can only hold so many electrons before it overflows. Because of the way the pixels are made, the overflow goes into the adjoining pixels horizontally, so the overflowing pixel leaks electrons into the pixels to its left and right (or above and below it). If enough light is hitting the one pixel, it can overflow the adjacent pixels, which flow into the next ones, and so on.
source

3)

Jpeg compression goes one step further, by organising regularities in the visual perception of an image and using lossy compression to reduce the file size of the image. This process involves a small but irreversible loss of quality as discussed in the errors below.
source

My avatar has nothing to do with Dr. Who.

Happy?

edit on 4/16/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
82
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join