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Measles outbreak traced to fully vaccinated patient.

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posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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Measles outbreak traced to fully vaccinated patient.


A person fully vaccinated against measles has contracted the disease and passed it on to others. The startling case study contradicts received wisdom about the vaccine and suggests that a recent swell of measles outbreaks in developed nations could mean more illnesses even among the vaccinated.

Ultimately, she transmitted the measles to four other people, according to a recent report in Clinical Infectious Diseases that tracked symptoms in the 88 people with whom “Measles Mary” interacted while she was sick. Surprisingly, two of the secondary patients had been fully vaccinated.

First off, the claim that this was the "first time", seems sketchy.

In all likelihood this has happened many times only to be ignored or intentionally concealed.


And even if a fully vaccinated person does become infected—a rare situation known as “vaccine failure”—they weren’t thought to be contagious.

I question this claim. How can they accurately measure "vaccine failure" when most of these diseases simply dont exist in many industrialized nations.

It would be like me selling you a rock claiming that it has the power to repel bear attacks. Forget the fact that there arent any bears, clearly the rock works!

For all we know, the vaccine is completely useless...




posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 04:22 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 



I question this claim. How can they accurately measure "vaccine failure" when most of these diseases simply dont exist in many industrialized nations.


Vaccine failure is described as someone contracting the disease after having the vaccination. The rates they come up with are tied to more than industrialized nations, but also were measured when they were prevalent and then receded after vaccinations.


When it comes to the measles vaccine, two shots are better than one. Most people in the United States are initially vaccinated against the virus shortly after their first birthday and return for a booster shot as a toddler. Less than 1% of people who get both shots will contract the potentially lethal skin and respiratory infection.




It would be like me selling you a rock claiming that it has the power to repel bear attacks. Forget the fact that there arent any bears, clearly the rock works!


Not really. There used to be bears...


Although most patients recovered without permanent sequelae, the high number of cases each year made measles a significant cause of serious morbidity and mortality Langmuir showed that >90% of Americans were infected with the measles virus by age 15 years [1]. This equated to roughly 1 birth cohort (4 million people) infected with measles each year. Not all cases were reported to the public health system; from 1956 to 1960, an average of 542,000 cases were reported annually. By the late 1950s, even before the introduction of measles vaccine, measles-related deaths and case fatality rates in the United States had decreased markedly, presumably as a result of improvement in health care and nutrition. From 1956 to 1960, an average of 450 measles-related deaths were reported each year (∼1 death/ 1000 reported cases), compared with an average of 5300 measles-related deaths during 1912–1916 (26 deaths/ 1000 reported cases) [2]. Nevertheless, in the late 1950s, serious complications due to measles remained frequent and costly. As a result of measles virus infections, an average of 150,000 patients had respiratory complications and 4000 patients had encephalitis each year; the latter was associated with a high risk of neurological sequelae and death. These complications and others resulted in an estimated 48,000 persons with measles being hospitalized every year [3]. In 1966, 3 years after licensure of the first measles vaccines, Sencer et al. [4] announced the first of 3 efforts to terminate indigenous measles transmission in the United States. Subsequent measles-elimination goals were announced in 1978 and in 1993. The fundamental strategy for all 3 elimination efforts consisted of achieving high vaccination coverage among preschool- and school-aged children, careful surveillance of cases, and rigorous outbreak control [4–6]. Although the first 2 elimination efforts did not achieve elimination, they resulted in a substantial reduction in measles incidence: An average of 1.3 cases per 100,000 population was reported during 1982–1988, compared with an average of 313 cases per 100,000 during 1956–1960


jid.oxfordjournals.org...
edit on 14-4-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-4-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-4-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


Theres no provable correlation yet I see this stated constantly, the idea that more vaccines = fewer diseases.

In 1900, gastrointestinal infections was a leading cause of death. This is no longer the case, yet theres no vaccine for gastrointestinal infections.

General medical advancements, knowledge and technology account for much of our improved health.


edit on 14-4-2014 by gladtobehere because: wording



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 04:45 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


That picture is chilling. 20ga needle not for babies though.

MMRII and ProQuad are some of the best tested, most effective vaccines on the market. Literally, 100s of thousands of lives are saved in Africa, where measles, mumps, rubella, varicella kill. They aren't considered life threatening in the US though. Rubella in pregnant women can have complications.

Anyway, no mercury preservative or Aluminum adjuvant listed on the package insert for either MMR2 and ProQuad.

link to all package inserts

From their insert, there is a 95% effectiveness after the first dose and there should be 3 for measles (I believe) which gets you to 99+%. More information could be added to the OP to indicate if that is the case and how long since being vaccinated. More information could be added to the OP to indicate if that is the case and how long since being vaccinated.



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


I can practically hear the pro-vaxers' teeth grinding.




posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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reply to post by InverseLookingGlass
 


Oh Bollocks, what is your control? The diminishing of most diseases has more to do with clean available water than anything else.



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 05:45 PM
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CagliostroTheGreat
reply to post by gladtobehere
 


I can practically hear the pro-vaxers' teeth grinding.



First mistake is thinking there is "pro-vax" and "anti-vax" people to begin with. In fact there is ignorant people and others who are impartial.

Not to say all vaccines are safe or perfect, which they aren't (which is why some make it to market and some don't, and why some are pulled from market.) But this is another attempt to try and completely disregard vaccines for a 1% incidence rate.

Basically putting your head in the sand.

Oh yeah, the "pro-vaxers" are grinding their teeth. Whoops, it was them who released the information to begin with though... If vaccines suddenly became ineffective overnight, the "pro-vaxers" would say, "look our vaccines aren't working anymore."

Just like antibiotics. People in the industry have been shouting from rooftops to curb indiscriminate antibiotic usage, but no one listens. Run from vaccines and plug yourself full of penicillin every time you get a cough, you know better than anyone how medicine works in your body. Don't need stupid science...
edit on 14-4-2014 by boncho because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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Blaming the un-vaccinated for the measles outbreak or any out break for that matter is like saying Antibiotic resistant bacteria are the result of people not taking antibiotics



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by Truedoc1
 


You aren't blaming people who aren't vaccinated when you point out the obvious - the more people there are who are not vaccinated, the more people there are who have no immune system exposure entirely. Those people are more likely to catch and perpetuate any outbreak than the people who have some immune system exposure although both people have a chance of catching the disease and being contagious.

Think about it - which person is more likely to catch a disease?



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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could be the vaccine is becoming ineffective is it possible these diseases are mutating ?



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 08:43 PM
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Evolution didn't require vaccines for human life to exist, the less fit that's genetics didn't develop antibodies to adapt died. Vaccines are a hurdle and disease mutates faster then you to overcome. Vaccines make us weaker imo.



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


Ultimately, she transmitted the measles to four other people, according to a recent report in Clinical Infectious Diseases that tracked symptoms in the 88 people with whom “Measles Mary” interacted while she was sick. Surprisingly, two of the secondary patients had been fully vaccinated. And although the other two had no record of receiving the vaccine, they both showed signs of previous measles exposure that should have conferred immunity (emphasis mine).

I can hear all the natural immunity people grinding their teeth.

MMR coverage (at least one dose) in New York City is ninety percent. So of the 89 people tracked by the CDC, we would expect 80 of them to have been vaccinated, and 9 of them to be unvaccinated. Three of the 80 vaccinated people contracted measles, that is 3.75%. Two of the nine unvaccinated people contracted measles, that is 22%. Draw whatever lesson from this you will.



posted on Apr, 14 2014 @ 08:56 PM
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But if someone is vaccinated and comes to the doctor with bumps, it is not the measles. No testing for measles will be done because the kid can't get them. All sorts of other tests can be done, but it is not recommended to test for something when there is no chance of getting it, the insurance may not pay the bill.

Interpretation of evidence is what is causing a lot of this. The doctor can call a disease something else if someone is vaccinated against the disease. This has been going on for a long time. Another thing is that doctors do not test for conditions that are rare. If they did, they might find out these conditions are actually not rare.



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 02:44 AM
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This is why it is important for those who can take the vaccination to do so. Heard immunity doesn't work when a large portion refuses the immunization. I have never read any literature which stated immunizations were a 100% effective but if everyone stoped getting them then there would be a crap ton more cases.

The article didn't say from whom she originally contracted it from just that she slipped through the cracks because they believed she hadn't contracted it due to having been immunized before.

Ever since the antivaccine movement has started growing so have outbreaks when many preventable diseases had almost been wiped out.

From the OP.



If it turns out that vaccinated people lose their immunity as they get older, that could leave them vulnerable to measles outbreaks seeded by unvaccinated people—which are increasingly common in the United States and other developed countries. Even a vaccine failure rate of 3% to 5% could devastate a high school with a few thousand students, says Robert Jacobson, director of clinical studies for the Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group in Rochester, Minnesota, who wasn’t involved with the study. Still, he says, “The most important ‘vaccine failure’ with measles happens when people refuse the vaccine in the first place.”


So they can add one to this years chart.





As an interactive map from the Council on Foreign Relations illustrates, several diseases that are easily prevented with vaccines have made a comeback in the past few years. Their resurgence coincides with changes in perceptions about vaccine safety. Since 2008 folks at the think tank CFR have been plotting all the cases of measles, mumps, rubella, polio and whooping cough around the world. Each circle on the map represents a local outbreak of a particular disease, while the size of the circle indicates the number of people infected in the outbreak. As you flip through the various maps over the years, two trends clearly emerge: Measles has surged back in Europe, while whooping cough is has become a problem here in the U.S. Childhood immunization rates plummeted in parts of Europe and the U.K. after a 1998 study falsely claimed that the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella was linked to autism. That study has since been found to be fraudulent. But fears about vaccine safety have stuck around in Europe and here in the U.S. Viruses and bacteria have taken full advantage of the immunization gaps. In 2011, France reported a massive measles outbreak with nearly 15,000 cases. Only the Democratic Republic of Congo, India, Indonesia, Nigeria and Somalia suffered larger measles outbreaks that year. In 2012, the U.K. reported more than 2,000 measles cases, the largest number since 1994. Here in the U.S., the prevalence of whooping cough shot up in 2012 to nearly 50,000 cases. Last year cases declined to about 24,000 — which is still more than tenfold the number reported back in the early '80s when the bacteria infected less than 2,000 people.

continue to source article at npr.org



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 04:38 AM
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Yes, this illustrates exactly the problem with herd immunity. We've dipped below the critical 90% level in far too many places. And once that happens, even people who have been vaccinated become vulnerable.



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 06:07 AM
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ERMAGERD this must mean that vaccination is useless !

Or alternatively for people with brains that in some extremely rare cases, it just doesn't work. There is this very small, mean part in me that would like to see all the anti-vaccination proponents get what they want. Or cart them off to Africa, where thousands of children die every day from preventable diseases, but where curiously, the lucky ones who get vaccinated don't.



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 06:50 AM
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reply to post by InverseLookingGlass
 





That picture is chilling. 20ga needle not for babies though.


Yea...exactly what I saw~! I was wondering what type of message the company /dark forces is trying to send?? that All babies need more injections and the vaccines we have aren't good enough so they now they need double doses ?? !!! WTF ? ?!!!

It's like the report 5 years ago that an autopsy was taken from A man that had died with 20lbs of undigested raw red meat in his stomach still .. A (meaning only 1 human male)was found to have this issue...

1...out of ...how many ??! what was the psych imprinted on the minds of the American's...All RED MEAT is bad...don't eat read meat..."

I was working with a good friend of mine and I mentioned like that day I was going to cook some steaks, "he snapped a look at me and said.."you know they found a guy with 20lbs of red meat after he died right? ! you should be eating red meat.."
I looked at him smile and said.. "thats A guy .. as in 1 male .. until there's an outbreak of near mass scale of this issue, I think it's still safe to eat red meat.. don't you ? and who the hell eats 20lbs of red meat anyways in one sitting?!!!! "

He just smiled...



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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The vaccine doesn't work, it never worked, You don't get an increased IgA response from an IgG stimulation.

edit on 15-4-2014 by Truedoc1 because: changed a question mark to a period.



posted on Apr, 15 2014 @ 01:11 PM
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My son had the chicken pox vaccine, and a couple of years later got the chicken pox. It does happen.

I'm on the vaccination fence. You can't convince me they are 100% safe. So we've done the major ones, but don't get the flu shot. It's the best I can come up with.




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