It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Can someone tell me how to make a pizza sauce from scatch

page: 3
6
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 11 2014 @ 03:25 PM
link   
Alert -- open a can of Italian tomato paste. Spread with a spoon and then add your toppings. It does not make the dough soggy and has just the right consistency.




posted on May, 15 2014 @ 01:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: searching411
Alert -- open a can of Italian tomato paste. Spread with a spoon and then add your toppings. It does not make the dough soggy and has just the right consistency.


That sure is simple, but won't it taste kind of bland.



posted on May, 15 2014 @ 07:45 AM
link   
a reply to: musicismagic

Try it. You can always add extra basil or oregano, etc, depending on your ingredients. I find it good for most toppings. Be sure not to lay it on too thick.



posted on May, 15 2014 @ 08:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: searching411
a reply to: musicismagic

Try it. You can always add extra basil or oregano, etc, depending on your ingredients. I find it good for most toppings. Be sure not to lay it on too thick.



I'll try it. The basil and oregano sound good. I'll try to post my pizza here.

files.abovetopsecret.com...

files.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 10 2014 @ 10:55 AM
link   
Just thought I would offer my opinion as I had two Italian restaurants and we made our own pizza sauce in the Neapolitan style. As with most cooking, simple is better and leads to more flavor. The food should speak for itself and not be overly adulterated.

As has been mentioned by other posters, never cook your pizza sauce, it will cook once it is on the pizza and cooking ahead of time removes much of the 'brightness' from the tomatoes. Simply blanch them, peel and deseed. Never use canned or jarred tomatoes unless absolutely necessary (canned tomatoes always seem to taste 'tinny' to me). I try to use San Marzano plum tomatoes, they are easy to locate or grow yourself. There are other heirloom varieties from the Naples region that you can also substitute.

Pass your sauce through a food mill or use and immersion blender to get an even consistency.

Marjoram works better than oregano as it is less bitter.

Do not add garlic or wine since you will not be cooking ahead of time. Garlic can be added directly to the pizza once it is ready for the oven. This gives you the ability to make various pizzas that do not require garlic as raw garlic can overpower the subtlety of the sauce.

Add salt, pepper and red pepper to taste after milling or blending. If your sauce does not have the correct sweetness it is acceptable to add a bit of sugar.

I always add a bit of high quality olive oil to the sauce prior to blending as it gives it a more rounded flavor.

Add the basil after cooking the pizza as it has a tendency to burn which will mar the flavor of your pizza.

Let the sauce sit at room temperature if using with an hour or two, it will help the flavor develop. If not using for awhile, cover and refrigerate but always bring to room temperature before using.



posted on Jun, 10 2014 @ 07:34 PM
link   
a reply to: musicismagic

It made a pretty appetizing picture. Hope it tasted as good as it looked.



posted on Jun, 11 2014 @ 02:44 AM
link   
melt 1tsp butter in a pan
caramelise 1 small onion in same pan
add 2 cloves of chopped garlic
add 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
add 2 tspn tomato paste stir it all
dump in 1 28 oz can crushed tomatos,1/2 cup vodka and 1/2 cup heavy cream
stir and simmer till slightly bubbles
sauce is ready.



posted on Jun, 23 2014 @ 07:10 AM
link   

originally posted by: khnum
melt 1tsp butter in a pan
caramelise 1 small onion in same pan
add 2 cloves of chopped garlic
add 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
add 2 tspn tomato paste stir it all
dump in 1 28 oz can crushed tomatos,1/2 cup vodka and 1/2 cup heavy cream
stir and simmer till slightly bubbles
sauce is ready.


now really this sounds interesting
the vodka, why, what does it do to its sauce flavor



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 04:16 PM
link   
I have no idea of the "proper" way to make a pizza sauce, but "frying" a tomato sauce at high heat will give it a super deep complex rich flavor. You'll loose the "brightness" the other poster mentioned, but it just comes down to what type of flavor you prefer.

Throw the sauce in a large frying pan at high heat, high enough that it burns within 10 seconds of not being stirred. Then just stir and scrape like a madman until the sauce is reduced down quite a bit, is darker in color, and has a deep rich mouth watering flavor. It's the same concept of caramelizing onions, except you are caramelizing the whole sauce. Add a bit of vinegar as well, it will add some punch profile to the sauce.

Again, not sure what the "proper" way is, and I'm sure some people will say you aren't supposed to do this or that with pizza sauce. Personally I cook to make delicious food, not to replicate what a certain culture of people prefer due to historical circumstances. The right way to cook is the way that tastes best to you.

If you have a good farmers market you'll likely be able to find tomatoes that taste far superior to anything you'll find in a supermarket or in a can, which carries over into a richer sauce too. As for spices, don't forget the paprika! Paprika is so ignored, that stuff tastes good with anything.

Don't be afraid to experiment and go against "traditional" practices!
edit on 30-6-2014 by James1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 6 2014 @ 07:16 AM
link   

originally posted by: James1982
I have no idea of the "proper" way to make a pizza sauce, but "frying" a tomato sauce at high heat will give it a super deep complex rich flavor. You'll loose the "brightness" the other poster mentioned, but it just comes down to what type of flavor you prefer.

Throw the sauce in a large frying pan at high heat, high enough that it burns within 10 seconds of not being stirred. Then just stir and scrape like a madman until the sauce is reduced down quite a bit, is darker in color, and has a deep rich mouth watering flavor. It's the same concept of caramelizing onions, except you are caramelizing the whole sauce. Add a bit of vinegar as well, it will add some punch profile to the sauce.

Again, not sure what the "proper" way is, and I'm sure some people will say you aren't supposed to do this or that with pizza sauce. Personally I cook to make delicious food, not to replicate what a certain culture of people prefer due to historical circumstances. The right way to cook is the way that tastes best to you.

If you have a good farmers market you'll likely be able to find tomatoes that taste far superior to anything you'll find in a supermarket or in a can, which carries over into a richer sauce too. As for spices, don't forget the paprika! Paprika is so ignored, that stuff tastes good with anything.

Don't be afraid to experiment and go against "traditional" practices!


Thanks, didn't know about the Paprika. I'll have to try it.




top topics



 
6
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join