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Esoteric Faith And Practice Of Jesus

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posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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The faith of Jesus is the knowledge that all existence is a materialization of the Divine Mind. And the Divine Mind is the only Mind, and so in truth your mind is the Divine Mind. It is just this faith that makes it so in appearance. Your mind and your reality are equivalent. Your reality is a materialization of your mind, as all reality is a materialization of the divine mind. When one has this faith and knowledge, one can make use of it.

If all is mind, nothing can happen without your mind making it so, and anything can be made so by that same mind. Thus Jesus has no fear when he is out at sea during a terrible storm. This also is also the meaning of Jesus’ teaching, ‘resist not evil; but whoever shall slap you on your right cheek, turn to him your other.’ Do not resist the negative in your life. In fact, do not even acknowledge its existence at all. Without giving it any focus whatsoever, it cannot be. It is only this mental focus that brings all things into existence, and sustains their existence.

It is in this way, using these principles, that Jesus performed his miracles. Through his absolute faith that his entire experience was of his own mind, and focusing that faith on his desired result. An absolute faith that it was so, a clear picture of what he wanted in his mind, and it was so. Thus even when attempting to bring a man back from the dead, he simply declared ‘Lazarus, come forth.’ He says something is so, with absolute faith and confidence, and it is so. This is the meaning of ‘the Word,’ ‘which was with God in the beginning, and was God.’ Again, ‘without him happened not even one thing that has happened.’

Jesus’ teachings were not intended to be a demonstration that he was the great exception of humanity, to whom no one could ever be compared. He was rather a demonstration of the inherent potential of humanity, the nature of his self and his reality and how to make use of it. Yet so much faith was put on him, that HE had particular powers, or was of particular importance. He had made clear that the divine mind was everywhere, that there was no other power than the One. Thus no man was exempt. His death was like a wink, his final teaching. His spirit lives on, for we are all of one mind and spirit. The faith-mind is one. It is just the self-created divisions within one’s Mind that makes all of this not apparent. ‘If your eye be single, your whole body shall be full of light.’ If you see only one, if there is no divisions in your mind to allow you to see more than one, everything will be bursting forth with the creative forces. Yet your mind must be unified, ‘for no man can serve two masters.’

edit on 12-4-2014 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 11:54 PM
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That was really well put. I like how you point out to not see the negative as a negative, and how He knew (had compete faith) and this is the reason for the miracles and energy. We are all connected but it can definitely be difficult to feel this when others are so out of sync with how we want to live. It is exhausting/draining to try to have peace of mind with the resistance that is out there some days. Thanks for your post - it was a needed message.



posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 11:58 PM
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Are you sure that Jesus just wasn't a Jewish political bandit who fought for the common man, thus acquiring the respect, and eventual worship, of a number of his fan-base? With the worship, came the stories and miracles. A lot of the recordings of Jesus' teachings came well after his death, and were altered numerous times by Christians who were trying to figure out the direction of a new religion...



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 12:52 AM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


I agree 100% except Jesus actually performing the miracles.

The single eye Jesus speaks of which is full of light is your minds eye or third eye, it is the One image your two eyes create. We all share the same image because we all see the same sunsets and moon, we are connected through this image in the way that we can see each other and interact with one another.

If you see the single eye (image) your spiritual body will be full of light. The One image is the Son of the living God, who is the invisible Spirit within all of us.

S&F
edit on 4/13/2014 by 3NL1GHT3N3D1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 12:54 AM
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daaskapital
Are you sure that Jesus just wasn't a Jewish political bandit who fought for the common man, thus acquiring the respect, and eventual worship, of a number of his fan-base? With the worship, came the stories and miracles. A lot of the recordings of Jesus' teachings came well after his death, and were altered numerous times by Christians who were trying to figure out the direction of a new religion...



The meaning of Jesus is more Universal and symbolic than trying to absolutely tie it to one definite historical figure. It is meant as it was intended as a teaching device, symbolic and literary. The symbol is more important than the actual, because 'he' IS that symbol moreso than he was a definite person in the world.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 02:21 AM
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reply to post by daaskapital
 


LMAO Jesus Bandit



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 02:25 AM
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TheJourney

daaskapital
Are you sure that Jesus just wasn't a Jewish political bandit who fought for the common man, thus acquiring the respect, and eventual worship, of a number of his fan-base? With the worship, came the stories and miracles. A lot of the recordings of Jesus' teachings came well after his death, and were altered numerous times by Christians who were trying to figure out the direction of a new religion...



The meaning of Jesus is more Universal and symbolic than trying to absolutely tie it to one definite historical figure. It is meant as it was intended as a teaching device, symbolic and literary. The symbol is more important than the actual, because 'he' IS that symbol moreso than he was a definite person in the world.


Indeed. I do agree that Jesus, as a symbol, is of greater importance than Jesus as an historical figure.

I do find it interesting how the teachings of Jesus have been perverted over time...I think his disciples, as well as early (and even modern) Christianity have greatly corrupted Jesus' intended messages, and political goals.

I don't believe that a lot of the messages presented today, about Jesus, are wholly correct. I do believe that some truths may still lie there, but yeah, considering the history of Christianity and the Middle East, i wouldn't put much faith in what any Christian church has to say...

I do find your interpretations of his messages intriguing. I do thank you for going out of your way to write this out.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 02:43 AM
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G0v0D47
reply to post by daaskapital
 


LMAO Jesus Bandit


I am not sure i understand what you are saying...unless you are referring to this:


Jesus bandit:

A person who takes jesus statues from churches and sells them for money to other churches.

www.urbandictionary.com...

If you are referring to Jesus actually being a bandit, than yes, there is some evidence to support that.




To understand Jesus, Aslan argues in Zealot, it’s necessary to understand that culture and the zeal that was at its core. Drawing on a well-established body of scholarship, Aslan paints a vivid, accessible portrait of Jesus as a Jewish nationalist, “a zealous revolutionary swept up, as all Jews of the era were, in the religious and political turmoil of first-century Palestine.” He knows that, even now, this idea will come to many Christian readers as a shock: The real Jesus, he writes, “bears little resemblance to the image of the gentle shepherd cultivated by the early Christian community.”

...

The paradox of writing about Jesus is that we can only form an idea of him from the scriptures we have, yet we can only evaluate the scriptures if we have an idea of what he must have been like. Aslan marches boldly into this vicious circle, guided by the certainty that the real Jesus must have been, above all, a Jewish zealot. He was a figure like “the Egyptian,” or the rabbi Judas, or for that matter John the Baptist: a religious virtuoso who played on the familiar tropes of Jewish grievance to ignite a mass movement. “The new world order he envisioned,” Aslan writes at characteristically high volume, “was so radical, so dangerous, so revolutionary, that Rome’s only conceivable response would be to arrest and execute [his followers] for sedition.”

There is much to be said for this point of view, and Aslan’s reading of the Gospels helps to clarify some of their ambiguities. Take, for instance, the moment when Jesus is asked, “Is it lawful to pay the tribute to Caesar or not?” In response, he takes a coin and asks whose picture is on it. “It is Caesar’s,” comes the reply; to which Jesus says, “Render therefore unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and unto God the things that are God’s.” At least, that is how the King James Bible translates his words; and in this form, their message seems to be a kind of political quietism. Keep paying taxes, Jesus seems to advise, and obey the government, since money and worldly affairs are the government’s concern. But entrust your soul, which is what really counts, to God.

Aslan, however, shows that the same passage can be translated quite differently: “Well, then, give back to Caesar the property that belongs to Caesar, and give back to God the property that belongs to God.” Read this way, Jesus sounds much more like a zealot, demanding that the land and people of Israel—which are God’s property—be returned to God and freed from Roman control. It is sayings like this, Aslan writes, that led Jesus to be labeled a “bandit”—a term that was used for all sorts of popular revolutionaries in Judea. When Jesus was crucified next to two “bandits,” then, we should not understand this to mean thieves, as though the Romans were devising an insult to Jesus. Rather, he was crucified next to fellow rebels, whose crime, like his, was agitating for Jewish independence.


www.tabletmag.com...



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 02:52 AM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


The description Jezus' life and goals, as most tales in the bible, is subject to interpretation. At the time of writing of the scriptures, at the times of selection of what to add to the bible (editing/selection was done in Rome, under Roman rule, by Romans), at the time of reading. This is not necessarily a bad thing, as it permits the reader to feel into the message in the scriptures, to stay purposefull and important throughout time. The danger is that someone does not read the same things you do.
That said: if people would read and think instead of read and reject, the world might be a better place.

edit on 13-4-2014 by Sheesh because: spelling



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 02:58 AM
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3NL1GHT3N3D1
reply to post by TheJourney
 


I agree 100% except Jesus actually performing the miracles.


Well, I don't necessarily mean to say that Jesus literally performed the miracles exactly as described by the bible. But, I do believe there is incredible, perhaps infinite, potential in manifesting the Mind in reality, as one develops the faith as described in OP. The miracles are symbolic of this general spiritual law.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 08:24 AM
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reply to post by daaskapital
 


If we're talking about a symbol here, then perhaps instead of always using Jesus as a placeholder, we could use the Maitreya. Google it.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


I agree that the miracles symbolize truth but them actually happening is false in my opinion. They are pagan interpolations in my opinion, put in to make Jesus seem more than just normal.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 12:38 PM
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3NL1GHT3N3D1
reply to post by TheJourney
 


I agree 100% except Jesus actually performing the miracles.

The single eye Jesus speaks of which is full of light is your minds eye or third eye, it is the One image your two eyes create. We all share the same image because we all see the same sunsets and moon, we are connected through this image in the way that we can see each other and interact with one another.

If you see the single eye (image) your spiritual body will be full of light. The One image is the Son of the living God, who is the invisible Spirit within all of us.

S&F
edit on 4/13/2014 by 3NL1GHT3N3D1 because: (no reason given)


How can you be sure he was not used as a focus point to manifest miracles? (do not really like the word miracle)

Even today people can come together and push chi to change the physical in a being (synchronous manipulation of the placebo effect that causes self healing). And it would not surprise me if Jesus in his following had a few chi pushers to help out with the manifestation.

And I do not put Jesus specifically on a pedestal since I think others like him can do the same things. There are other chakra masters who have said to have been able to walk on water. Neat trick but normally not very useful.
edit on 13-4-2014 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 01:31 PM
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TheJourney
The faith of Jesus is the knowledge that all existence is a materialization of the Divine Mind. And the Divine Mind is the only Mind, and so in truth your mind is the Divine Mind. It is just this faith that makes it so in appearance. Your mind and your reality are equivalent. Your reality is a materialization of your mind, as all reality is a materialization of the divine mind. When one has this faith and knowledge, one can make use of it.

If all is mind, nothing can happen without your mind making it so, and anything can be made so by that same mind. Thus Jesus has no fear when he is out at sea during a terrible storm. This also is also the meaning of Jesus’ teaching, ‘resist not evil; but whoever shall slap you on your right cheek, turn to him your other.’ Do not resist the negative in your life. In fact, do not even acknowledge its existence at all. Without giving it any focus whatsoever, it cannot be. It is only this mental focus that brings all things into existence, and sustains their existence.

It is in this way, using these principles, that Jesus performed his miracles. Through his absolute faith that his entire experience was of his own mind, and focusing that faith on his desired result. An absolute faith that it was so, a clear picture of what he wanted in his mind, and it was so. Thus even when attempting to bring a man back from the dead, he simply declared ‘Lazarus, come forth.’ He says something is so, with absolute faith and confidence, and it is so. This is the meaning of ‘the Word,’ ‘which was with God in the beginning, and was God.’ Again, ‘without him happened not even one thing that has happened.’

Jesus’ teachings were not intended to be a demonstration that he was the great exception of humanity, to whom no one could ever be compared. He was rather a demonstration of the inherent potential of humanity, the nature of his self and his reality and how to make use of it. Yet so much faith was put on him, that HE had particular powers, or was of particular importance. He had made clear that the divine mind was everywhere, that there was no other power than the One. Thus no man was exempt. His death was like a wink, his final teaching. His spirit lives on, for we are all of one mind and spirit. The faith-mind is one. It is just the self-created divisions within one’s Mind that makes all of this not apparent. ‘If your eye be single, your whole body shall be full of light.’ If you see only one, if there is no divisions in your mind to allow you to see more than one, everything will be bursting forth with the creative forces. Yet your mind must be unified, ‘for no man can serve two masters.’

edit on 12-4-2014 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)


I am a big fan of good science-fiction, social anticipation and philosophic kind of science-fiction in which technology is but a pretext to something bigger and deeper, and what I like to read the most is fictitious philosophy, because I find it really intellectually entertaining and stimulating. I like it when for example the author explains an extraordinary event or a 'super power' by giving a very detailed description of what happens in the mind of the protagonist(s), detailing every thought and every logical link in the thought process' structure. The sci-fi author Alfred Elton van Vogt was a master in this category. I am trying to write that kind of science-fiction because like most authors I write what I would enjoy reading. Your piece here is pretty good.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by TheJourney
 


I hate to tell you this, but this is a pantheistic ideology, as where Jesus never taught pantheism. Jesus taught God is outside of our box, and created the box, and can interact with the box. We are not part of God. If you are trying to describe "consciousness" as the "mind" then perhaps we can speak a little more, but ultimately it is not the "God" he was speaking of. This teaching is incorrect to biblical fundamentalism and may lead people away from Jesus' true teachings. Jesus spoke about Him being God. Research the prophecies of the Scriptures to truly understand who Jesus is. And be careful not to bleed in other religions and try to mix them in all as one... That's not what Jesus taught.



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Myollinir
 


Um....he taught that we are the branches to the vine, ie we are the infinite parts of infinity in the infinite, but never ending and can't be defined or its finite, whole of infinity.

He also said everything he says is a metaphor, so you have to dig deep for the inner meanings, and look past any fundamental fairy tale.
edit on 13-4-2014 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 07:42 PM
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Myollinir
reply to post by TheJourney
 
This teaching is incorrect to biblical fundamentalism


Thank God


Really though, 'biblical fundamentalism' is just ONE interpretation of the teachings of jesus. Originally, there were many different sects of believers in Jesus, with many different beliefs. The gnostics, for instance. But it was only hundreds of years after Jesus that they decided on the 'one official christianity,' with the 'one official creed and canon.'
edit on 13-4-2014 by TheJourney because: (no reason given)




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