8-Legged Nightmares? The World's 3 Deadliest Spiders, and More Pics

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posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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Nothing seems to strike fear into our hearts more than spiders (unless it would be snakes!).

From the arachnid family, spiders form the largest part. There are about 40,000 different species of spiders, and of those, about a dozen are deadly enough to kill a human.

Do you recognize any of these from your area? It wouldn't hurt to learn about them so you can RUN if you see one! LOL

Here are three of the deadliest spiders in the world, which could be crawling around in an area near you!
news.yahoo.com...




The Brazilian wandering spider, or banana spider, has repeatedly ranked as the world's most venomous spider in "Guinness World Records." Fittingly, it belongs to the genus Phoneutria, which means "murderess" in Greek. [Creepy! Amazing Photos of Spiders]

The spider's bite is potent enough to kill a human within minutes if antidote isn't delivered. Even with antivenom, on rare occasions, the bite can still prove deadly. Just 6 micrograms of venom are enough to kill a 20-gram mouse, and the spider carries more than 10 times that amount of venom in reserve.

In addition, the spider's bite can cause a long, painful erection in men, scientists discovered in 2007. The venom boosts levels of nitric oxide, a chemical that increases blood flow, and some have considered using the venom in drugs for erectile dysfunction.

Found mostly in South America, the large brown spider, which sometimes sports a black spot on its belly, can reach up to 2 inches (5 centimeters) in body length, with a leg span of 5 to 6 inches (12 to 15 cm).

The spider has a trademark move, raising its two front legs in an intimidating pose when frightened. This pose reveals the arachnid's red-haired fangs. The "wandering" part of its name comes from the spider's hunting habits. Instead of using a web to catch prey, the Brazilian spider "wanders" around and hunts on the ground.




Black widow spider

The ominously named black widow is a shiny black spider, but the females have an even more ominous hourglass-shaped mark on their abdomens, as if to say "time is running out." They earned the name "widow" because the females of many species eat the males after mating. Several species of black widow spiders exist, residing in temperate areas around the world. They are the most venomous spiders in North America. Before the antivenom was discovered, about 5 percent of black widow bites proved fatal.

These spiders like to lurk in woodpiles, sheds, outdoor furniture and chain-link fences, but they have a special predilection for old-fashioned outhouses. (Perhaps that's where these lyrics from the Australian country song about the black widow's cousin the redback spider come from: "There was a redback on the toilet seat/When I was there last night. I didn't see him in the dark/But boy, I felt his bite!") Fortunately, modern home plumbing and heating make such outhouse encounters rare.




Funnel web spider

The deadly Australian funnel web spiders owe their name to the conical webs these creatures use as burrows or prey traps. In fact, there are three different families of funnel web spiders, only some of which are dangerous to humans. The Hexathelidae family — the dangerous variety — includes about 40 species in Australia, such as the notorious Sydney funnel spider and its tree-dwelling cousins.

These spiders are usually black or brown; sport a shiny, hard, slightly hairy covering called a carapace on the front of their bodies; and range between 0.4 and 2 inches (1 to 5 cm) in body length. Nocturnal creatures, they prefer humid climates. Most live on the ground, but some dwell in trees. The bite can be life-threatening, especially in children, but is usually nonfatal if antivenom is administered.

So be careful of these little, leggy beasts. But if all these eight-legged horrors scare you, keep in mind that most deadly spiders are shy and attack only when threatened.


Here are more pictures of different varieties:


Above, a Mexican red knee spider, a type of tarantula that lives mainly on the Pacific coast of Mexico.




A trapdoor spider, Liphistius dangrek. These spiders spend most of their time in underground burrows, emerging mainly to grab prey. Their rear half is segmented, a trait visible in some of the earliest spider fossils.




This is a rare 100-million-year-old fossil of a spider in limestone. Spiders do not preserve well in sediment because they have a relatively soft “shell” or exoskeleton. For every 1,000 or so insect fossils found, there’s only one spider.




This spider was trapped in tree resin about 20 million years ago. Over, time the resin fossilized into amber, preserving the animal inside.




A brown recluse, Loxosceles reclusa. This spider is identified by a dark, violin-shaped mark on its head. Its venom can cause a deep wound in humans that takes weeks or even months to heal and can produce symptoms such as nausea and a fever.

I've seen many of these crawling around my workplace! If they bite you, LOOK OUT! I've even heard of people's skin rotting off, and spreading to surrounding areas, if they didn't seek help immediately!



A gooty sapphire ornamental spider, Poecilotheria metallica, shown from above.




A gooty sapphire ornamental spider seen from below.
I like the colors on his legs, but...




A golden orb-web spider, Nephila pilipes. Found throughout parts of Asia, this large spider has yellow on its abdomen and spins a golden web.




An orb weaver Argiope sp. Members of this genus are found all around the world and spin large webs that often contain striking designs.
I've seen these in my neck of the woods. They do make some awesome designs in their webs.




A funnel-web wolf spider, Sosippus californicus. This spider spins a sheet-like web attached to a narrow tube, or funnel. Sitting at the mouth of the tube, the spider waits to strike after feeling vibrations of prey crossing the web.

There are lots of this type where I live. They scare the crap out of me!!




A southern house spider, Kukulcania hibernalis. The large charcoal-colored females make flat, tangled webs in dark corners and under overhangs and shutters to catch insects.
I live in the south.
I better never see one of these in my house!!




An Indian ornamental tarantuala, Poecilotheria regalis.

I know lots of people keep tarantulas as pets! I will NEVER understand how someone could have one of these in their home on purpose!


More Pics here: www.livescience.com...
I hoped you enjoyed our little science lesson on spiders, and your skin didn't crawl too much while reading.




posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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Spider that part of the death process is painful unending erection...

Kill it with fire, lots of fire.

Wd-40 and lighter...



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:45 PM
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And yet again I click on another scary spider thread. Why? Why do I do this? I need help...



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:48 PM
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ABNARTY
And yet again I click on another scary spider thread. Why? Why do I do this? I need help...


Its like the UFO / Paranormal threads late at night, you just have to click um.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by sled735
 


*beezzer runs in, reads quickly, Stars and flags thread (because he is brave) and runs right back out*

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by sled735
 





Black Widows

These spiders like to lurk in woodpiles, sheds, outdoor furniture and chain-link fences, but they have a special predilection for old-fashioned outhouses.


These boogers love carrots too! They were all over the carrots in my last garden. They weren't around any other plant that I could see.




A brown recluse, Loxosceles reclusa. This spider is identified by a dark, violin-shaped mark on its head. Its venom can cause a deep wound in humans that takes weeks or even months to heal and can produce symptoms such as nausea and a fever.


Those things don't play. They're all over the place where I live. I've seen some nasty bites. Interestingly enough, years after the wound heals, a simple bruise in the same spot might trigger another onset of the rotting skin (it's really fatty tissue).



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:55 PM
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They say that the common wolf spider [the UK one] has one of the most deadly neurotoxins in its venom, but they have noteeth and carry a minute amount, lol.

Hows that for a catch 22. LOL
edit on b5656708 by Biigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by JohnFisher
 


REALLY?!!! Thanks for the tip! I'll leave the carrots out of the garden this year!



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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beezzer
reply to post by sled735
 


*beezzer runs in, reads quickly, Stars and flags thread (because he is brave) and runs right back out*

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE


Funny! Come on back and chat awhile, they don't hurt much. (Lies) LOL
Do you recognize any of these in your area?

Thanks for the quick S&F.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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Biigs
They say that the common wolf spider [the UK one] has one of the most deadly neurotoxins in its venom, but they have noteeth and carry a minute amount, lol.

Hows that for a catch 22. LOL
edit on b5656708 by Biigs because: (no reason given)


I'm happy to hear nature took care of that problem, at least for us humans. It probably doesn't take much to kill it's tiny insect victims, or whatever it eats.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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reply to post by sled735
 

I do not like spiders at all but i like this thread.

Very good job



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:09 PM
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sled735

beezzer
reply to post by sled735
 


*beezzer runs in, reads quickly, Stars and flags thread (because he is brave) and runs right back out*

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE


Funny! Come on back and chat awhile, they don't hurt much. (Lies) LOL
Do you recognize any of these in your area?

Thanks for the quick S&F.


I actually had someone from my unit appear on one of those tv shows about deadly spiders.

A brown recluse bit him on the leg.

He almost lost the leg! We ended up going to OTC together. Massive scars, just over a simple bite.

oh yeah. . .

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:12 PM
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Here is a Grand Daddy Long Legs.
We used to play with these when I was young. They are probably outnumber any type I see around here. (That doesn't mean there aren't more of the others, I just don't see them as often.)
I can still pick one up by the leg and throw it off the porch when I see one. It's the only one that doesn't scare me. Why, I'll never know, because they can bite!
They have no poison or venom that will harm a human being. They do have a very mild venom but it's for their insect prey.




edit on 4/11/2014 by sled735 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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Mianeye
reply to post by sled735
 

I do not like spiders at all but i like this thread.

Very good job




You liar! LOL I see your avatar.

Thanks for the compliment.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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A black widow spider once died from a Watchitburn bite.
Definitely not my wisest decision, alcohol was involved.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by watchitburn
 


WHAT?!!!
OMG!!!



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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beezzer

sled735

beezzer
reply to post by sled735
 


*beezzer runs in, reads quickly, Stars and flags thread (because he is brave) and runs right back out*

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE


Funny! Come on back and chat awhile, they don't hurt much. (Lies) LOL
Do you recognize any of these in your area?

Thanks for the quick S&F.


I actually had someone from my unit appear on one of those tv shows about deadly spiders.

A brown recluse bit him on the leg.

He almost lost the leg! We ended up going to OTC together. Massive scars, just over a simple bite.

oh yeah. . .

EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE


Yes, they can do some major damage!

Just a tip, now that spring is here (in the U.S.). Check those shoes that have been in the closet all winter before you put them on. Spiders have been known to make nests in them! When you stick your foot in...

SURPRIZE!!!



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:21 PM
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I am so glad i dont live in Australia, they seem to have the worst of it!!!!

Half the nasty killers like to live in your shoes too! EEEK



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:22 PM
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There are many myths about spiders. Here is a site that tells the top 10:
crazyhorsesghost.hubpages.com...




edit on 4/11/2014 by sled735 because: add pic



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:24 PM
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sled735
There are many myths about spiders. Here is a site that tells the top 10:
crazyhorsesghost.hubpages.com...


Most of them dont usually bite, its the big, huge plate size face huggers that scare me.

Tho being bitten in the night by a little nasty one sucks since by the time you notice, you are likely to die. Nasty.

Okay question, would you rather face a tiny spider with evil venom, or a snake with evil venom?





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