It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Malaysia starts investigating confused initial response to missing jet

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 06:41 AM
link   


Malaysia's government has begun investigating civil aviation and military authorities to determine why opportunities to identify and track Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 were missed in the chaotic hours after it vanished, two officials said.

The preliminary internal enquiries come as tensions mount between civilian and military authorities over who bears most responsibility for the initial confusion and any mistakes that led to a week-long search in the wrong ocean.

Malaysia starts investigating confused initial response to missing jet

They are only now starting to investigate this a month later? Memories fade quickly and any decent investigation would have started much sooner, but by now I guess we've come to realize that Malaysia has some issues to deal with.

The gist of the problem seems to be that the "silos" in Malaysia weren't talking to each other and exchanging information, and according to this news it's still unclear exactly what information the Malaysian military turned over to the airline and civilian traffic controllers about the plane they tracked. Another report said that nobody was watching the unidentified plane in real time when it appeared on Malaysian military radar, and it wasn't until later that the military went back to their radar to notice what had already transpired.

The big deal of course is that so much time was wasted in the early part of the search and rescue operations looking in the wrong areas.

By the time this investigation is over some people are probably going to lose their jobs, but we'll have to see about that.




posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 08:34 AM
link   

Arbitrageur


Malaysia's government has begun investigating civil aviation and military authorities to determine why opportunities to identify and track Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 were missed in the chaotic hours after it vanished, two officials said.

The preliminary internal enquiries come as tensions mount between civilian and military authorities over who bears most responsibility for the initial confusion and any mistakes that led to a week-long search in the wrong ocean.

Malaysia starts investigating confused initial response to missing jet

They are only now starting to investigate this a month later? Memories fade quickly and any decent investigation would have started much sooner, but by now I guess we've come to realize that Malaysia has some issues to deal with.

The gist of the problem seems to be that the "silos" in Malaysia weren't talking to each other and exchanging information, and according to this news it's still unclear exactly what information the Malaysian military turned over to the airline and civilian traffic controllers about the plane they tracked. Another report said that nobody was watching the unidentified plane in real time when it appeared on Malaysian military radar, and it wasn't until later that the military went back to their radar to notice what had already transpired.

The big deal of course is that so much time was wasted in the early part of the search and rescue operations looking in the wrong areas.

By the time this investigation is over some people are probably going to lose their jobs, but we'll have to see about that.


And why scramble jets if there is a rocket that can be fired?

No one is going to lose their jobs, because the military is keeping quiet about it. I thought maybe it was shot down by Vietnam, but perhaps it was done by Malaysia instead?




and it wasn't until later that the military went back to their radar to notice what had already transpired.


How much later? An hour, two hours? Three minutes? This doesn't sound like normal operating procedure, usually aircraft are monitored, especially unidentified. But they act so casual about an unidentified aircraft?

Here is the US procedure for Tracking Aircraft

I looked for something about international procedures and came up with
This


Let’s go back to 8 March and start again from the point where the Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 radar return disappears from ATC screens as the transponder is deactivated, then turns west from its north-easterly heading.


It never reached Australia Military Radar which clearly shows it is capable of seeing what is going on as far as Malaysia.

JORN does not operate on a 24 hour basis except during military contingencies. Defence’s peacetime use of JORN focuses on those objects that the system has been designed to detect,
thus ensuring efficient use of resources.


Was Australia's radar operational? Had it been, then 777 would have been picked up, as far as Malaysia.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 11:16 AM
link   

WarminIndy
How much later? An hour, two hours? Three minutes? This doesn't sound like normal operating procedure, usually aircraft are monitored, especially unidentified. But they act so casual about an unidentified aircraft?
They weren't acting casually about an unidentified aircraft if the report I read was accurate. It said that nobody was even looking at their radar. And yes I'd like to know at what time they finally went to take a look at it, but the article left the impression it was hours later. If they ever decide to share the results of their investigation we may find out, but I don't know how much they will share. Stuff like that they may prefer to hide and sweep under the rug.


Was Australia's radar operational? Had it been, then 777 would have been picked up, as far as Malaysia.
I don't know if it was in operation or not, but even if it was operating, you are overstating its capabilities. It's nowhere near as reliable as you seem to think at such great distances. How well it works can depend on conditions beyond their control like the current state and stability of the ionosphere.

Some people have hypothesized about the possibility of Australia shooting it down, but if the inmarsat data is right it wasn't heading directly toward Australia so wasn't a direct threat (so why would they shoot it down before it approached the mainland?), and that data would also suggest it wasn't shot down earlier.

But yes there are a lot of unanswered questions. I'd like to think we'll get the answers some day and had it been say a US, UK or Australian flight I think the answers would come out eventually, though those countries certainly have no exemption from initial confusion. From Malaysia however, I'm not sure if we'll ever really know the answers we want to know.
edit on 11-4-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 11:23 AM
link   
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 



yes,, it was Johnny's fault,,,






damn




posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 11:49 AM
link   
reply to post by BobAthome
 

I already laughed at that movie long before MH370, but out of respect for the grieving families I'm not laughing or joking about things related to this incident before a proper, respectful period of time has passed. After such time, I could almost see someone making a comedy out of the blunders like searching in the totally wrong areas at first, the stories which changed daily, etc. There will probably be several documentaries made about this, but I'm not sure about the comedy, though there's certainly enough material for it.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 01:33 PM
link   

Arbitrageur

WarminIndy
How much later? An hour, two hours? Three minutes? This doesn't sound like normal operating procedure, usually aircraft are monitored, especially unidentified. But they act so casual about an unidentified aircraft?
They weren't acting casually about an unidentified aircraft if the report I read was accurate. It said that nobody was even looking at their radar. And yes I'd like to know at what time they finally went to take a look at it, but the article left the impression it was hours later. If they ever decide to share the results of their investigation we may find out, but I don't know how much they will share. Stuff like that they may prefer to hide and sweep under the rug.


Was Australia's radar operational? Had it been, then 777 would have been picked up, as far as Malaysia.
I don't know if it was in operation or not, but even if it was operating, you are overstating its capabilities. It's nowhere near as reliable as you seem to think at such great distances. How well it works can depend on conditions beyond their control like the current state and stability of the ionosphere.

Some people have hypothesized about the possibility of Australia shooting it down, but if the inmarsat data is right it wasn't heading directly toward Australia so wasn't a direct threat (so why would they shoot it down before it approached the mainland?), and that data would also suggest it wasn't shot down earlier.

But yes there are a lot of unanswered questions. I'd like to think we'll get the answers some day and had it been say a US, UK or Australian flight I think the answers would come out eventually, though those countries certainly have no exemption from initial confusion. From Malaysia however, I'm not sure if we'll ever really know the answers we want to know.
edit on 11-4-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification


It seems to me that Malaysia is still primitive or it simply doesn't react. That's why I am leaning toward Vietnam. I think the Vietnamese saw an unidentified aircraft and reacted.

Nobody was looking at the radar? That's incredibly strange.

Malaysia, Vietnam, China Point Fingers this is why I say Vietnam...


Malaysia has criticized Vietnam for releasing — prematurely, Malaysia insists — photos of possible debris amid the search.


Why does Malaysia insist on searching near Australia? Why is the information between Malaysia and Vietnam so different?

Vietnam Source

Vietnam was expecting it, Vietnam had it on radar, Vietnam lost contact.


Malaysia Airlines said that the plane took off at 12.41am Malaysia time, and that the plane disappeared from air traffic control radar in Subang, a suburb of Kuala Lumpur, at 2.40am.

That timeline seemed to suggest that the plane stayed in the air for two hours – long enough to fly not only across the Gulf of Thailand but also far north across Vietnam. But Lindahl of Flightradar 24 said that the last radar contact had been at 1.19am, less than 40 minutes after the flight began.


Malaysia is hiding something, Vietnam found something and everyone is looking in the wrong place, in Australia. Vietnam knew where to look. But this information is being buried more every day. In the amount of time it took to disappear, which should have taken it across Vietnam, it was only at a suburb of Kuala Lumpur, the very airport it took off from?

Flying under radar? How about flying in circles over Kuala Lumpur.



new topics

top topics
 
1

log in

join