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What's your nomination for Most Important book written in the last 471 years?

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posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 01:32 AM
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It can be on any subject
in any deciphered language
obscurity does not disqualify,
and even if it is widely called a hoax
it is still admissible as your nomination for
Most Important Book written in the last 471 years.


Mike Grouchy




posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 01:55 AM
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Why 471?

My nomination is Brave New World.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 02:01 AM
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igloo
Why 471?

My nomination is Brave New World.




Great choice!





I chose the time limit
of 471 years so to exclude
De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium.


Mike Grouchy
edit on 11-4-2014 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 02:11 AM
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reply to post by mikegrouchy
 

The one with the biggest impact is possibly Darwin's Origin of Species.
A controversial choice, but that proves the point.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 02:17 AM
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DISRAELI
reply to post by mikegrouchy
 

The one with the biggest impact is possibly Darwin's Origin of Species.
A controversial choice, but that proves the point.






Brilliant choice, and as to controversy...

The last time I asked this question, back in 2010, "The Origin of Species" was the most frequent choice.


Mike Grouchy
edit on 11-4-2014 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 02:47 AM
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reply to post by mikegrouchy
 


Does "The Wealth of Nations" by Adam Smith qualify??



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 02:49 AM
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These were the choices by members who responded, from back in 2010, sorted by any book in the time period stated that were picked by two or more members.

(Votes) list sorted by two or more
(5) On the Origin of the species
(4) Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica by I. Newton
(3) 1984
(2) Candide
(2) The Celestine Prophecy
(2) The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins
(2) The Structure of scientific revolutions

Mike Grouchy



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 02:51 AM
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ColCurious
reply to post by mikegrouchy
 


Does "The Wealth of Nations" by Adam Smith qualify??






"An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations"

Qualify?
Not just yes, but hell yes!


It was published in 1776


Mike Grouchy
edit on 11-4-2014 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 02:52 AM
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reply to post by mikegrouchy
 


The Hunger Games. It is a perfect analogy to modern day, and future civilization. Anyone who says the bible, get off your high-horse-bandwagon.

I chose this as it is now a mainstream movie and book, well written, and I realize the bible was written before the limit stated. Just correcting myself, all of the top 5 from 2010 are a much better choice, but I stick with my response.
edit on 4/11/14 by SixX18 because: Realized something seen in the posts



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 03:02 AM
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SixX18

The Hunger Games. It is a perfect analogy to modern day, and future civilization. Anyone who says the bible, get off your high-horse-bandwagon.

I chose this as it is now a mainstream movie and book, well written, and I realize the bible was written before the limit stated. Just correcting myself, all of the top 5 from 2010 are a much better choice, but I stick with my response.






I have not seen any of the movies, nor read the book(s),
but I have been very aware of this books effect on the
national discourse and politics in general.

I say it deserves this nomination.



Mike Grouchy



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 03:06 AM
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A very rare book on medieval tournament fighting called De Arte Athletica published in 1542.
It's full of cool pictures to look at.


Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 03:12 AM
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weirdguy
A very rare book on medieval tournament fighting called De Arte Athletica published in 1542.
It's full of cool pictures to look at.


Opus_Amplissimum_de_Arte_Athletica


Interesting book, thanks for the link.

Alas it is two years too old to meet the 471 year period.

Meaning it would be in competition with De revolutionibus orbium coelestium


Star none the less!

I am a bit of a medievalist after all.


Mike Grouchy



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 03:51 AM
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Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, because it deals with one of the most important social conflicts of our time; the diminishing meritocracy and the emerging paradigm of forced egalitarianism.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 04:01 AM
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Snsoc
Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand, because it deals with one of the most important social conflicts of our time; the diminishing meritocracy and the emerging paradigm of forced egalitarianism.





Not bad.

I have had a lot of conversations with college students who were greatly influenced by Ayn Rand.

When I myself was in college, on girl insisted that I read "The Fountainhead" before she would date me.












Of course I read it.
How could I say no to a hot Serbian chick, who's family had survived the conflict and moved to Louisiana.


Mike Grouchy



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 04:15 AM
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1984 - George Orwell
Along with The Prince - Machiavelli
Theres a few others but theyre written before your time limit ..



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 04:39 AM
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reply to post by mikegrouchy
 


I don't know about everyone else but I find this one of the greatest books ever written and surprisingly accurate.



It's my number one for now anyhow's.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 04:46 AM
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I was going to say Darwin too, but there is a hidden gem that paved the way for modern science:

"Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica" by Isaac Newton, a true genius. Space travel could have never happened without his findings.




posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 04:47 AM
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Expat888
1984 - George Orwell
Along with The Prince - Machiavelli
Theres a few others but theyre written before your time limit ..





One of the few books I'm glad they made me read in school.






As to "The Prince", did you know that Niccolò Machiavelli wrote it as a direct response to
The Memoirs of Philip de Commines, Lord of Argenton: Containing the Histories of Louis XI and Charles VIII, Kings of France and of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

It is .... how to say it ... the story of the first super state, how to turn secret agents, the first political tell-all, the true prequel to "the three musketeers", how spies and legal contracts are almost inseparable concepts, and much much more. It's the story of the Spider King. A nickname that Louis was given for all the webs of intrigue he weaved.

The book created such a stir among the ruling class of Europe that Machiavelli wrote his masterpiece to explain how The Spider King hadn't gone far enough, and how he _should_ have handled things.

But, in my opinion, The Memoirs are far more significant.


Also, sorry to say The Prince misses the time cut off by eleven years.

S&F none the less!


Mike Grouchy



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 04:48 AM
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Tragedy And Hope, subtitled "A History Of The World In Our Time" is an epic and scholarly work of history written by Carroll Quigley. The book covers the period of roughly 1880 to 1963 and is multidisciplinary in nature though perhaps focusing on the economic problems brought about by the First World War and the impact these had on subsequent events. While global in scope, the book focusses on Western civilization, because Quigley has more familiarity with the West. en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 04:58 AM
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168617
reply to post by mikegrouchy
 


I don't know about everyone else but I find this one of the greatest books ever written and surprisingly accurate.



It's my number one for now anyhow's.



Interesting. It was my understanding that the ideal of an Islamic woman will view her man as the only valid, and living, interpretation of the Quran. As the Quran is only to be truely understood in Arabic, and even then only by men.

I mean, I had come to the understanding that the book, even the text itself is not revered so much, as how it comes alive in the Arabic speaking man who immerses themselves in it.

Isn't the copy above a translation?


Mike Grouchy
edit on 11-4-2014 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)




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