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Atom/Photon Switch May Herald Quantum Computing Breakthrough

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posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 09:27 PM
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A switch made of a single metallic atom interacting with a single photon has been created. The atom can change the polarization of the photon, and the photon can change the energy level of the atom. It appears that such switches might replace micro-miniaturized transistor logic switches in computer integrated chips.
www.scienceworldreport.com/articles/13946/20140410/new-atom-photon-switch-herald-brealthrough-quantum-computers.htm




posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 09:43 PM
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Nice find. The original story is from MIT. I feel great computing jumps in the near future.

newsoffice.mit.edu...
edit on 4/10/2014 by shaneslaughta because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 09:54 PM
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I don't think many people understand quantum computing and how big of a deal it is and how it will ultimately change the world we live in, and I don't pretend to know a great deal either but this is quite a significant step tbh, so here's for those that are a bit foggy on quantum computing




Quantum physics deals with the behavior of the smallest things in our universe: subatomic particles. It is a new science, only coming into its own in the early part of the 20th century, when physicists began questioning why they couldn't explain certain radiation effects. One of those pioneering thinkers, Max Planck, used the term "quanta" for the tiny particles of energy he was studying, hence the term "quantum physics" [source: PBS]. Planck said the amount of energy contained in an electron is not arbitrary, but is a multiple of a standard "quantum" of energy. One of the first practical uses of this knowledge led to the invention of the transistor. Unlike the inflexible laws of standard physics, the rules of quantum physics seem made to be broken. Just when scientists think they have one aspect of their study of matter and energy figured out, a new twist emerges to remind them how unpredictable their field is. Still, they are able to harness, if not totally understand, their findings to develop new technologies that sometimes can only be called fantastic. In the future, quantum mechanics may help keep military secrets secure and protect your bank account information from online thieves. Scientists are working on quantum computers that can execute jobs far beyond the capabilities of today's machines. Broken into subatomic particles, items might be transported from one location to another in the blink of an eye. And, perhaps most intriguing of all, quantum physics may lead us to discover just what the universe is made of and what or who did the making. So keep reading to find out how quantum physics may change the world. Although you may enjoy the benefits in the future, don't necessarily expect to grasp how they are executed. As Niels Bohr said, "Anyone not shocked by quantum mechanics has not yet understood it"


futureblogger.net...



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by TritonTaranis
 


Quantum computation is great for what it's good for, which is mainly solving systems of equations and/or reducing the complexity of problems. It's not so good for running Crysis at full frame rate.

However, THIS article's not about quantum computing, it's about quantum dot logic, which can include qubits, but is mostly just ungodly fast, efficient logic gates that are as compact as a gate can be, physically. It's the rainbow's end of Moore's Law.

Your gubmint is very hot for QDL that's fieldable. It's where you get zettaflop computers, and start knocking on the door of that euphemistic thing that DARPA et al call "emergent behavior", when the thing starts singing Daisy, Daisy after a few lessons. QDL is the next step there.



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