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“The Bible’s Prehistory, Purpose, and Political Future”

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posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 02:40 PM
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Op asked for the thread not to be derailed.

We are not discussing the Book of the Dead and the Bible. As you mention, there are threads already in existence for that.

Here's a thought - Go, resurrect one of those necro threads. It would be appropriate for talking about The Book of the Dead, no?
Then, we can all be on topic.




posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 02:42 PM
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ketsuko
Op asked for the thread not to be derailed.

We are not discussing the Book of the Dead and the Bible. As you mention, there are threads already in existence for that.

Here's a thought - Go, resurrect one of those necro threads. It would be appropriate for talking about The Book of the Dead, no?
Then, we can all be on topic.


The Egyptian book of the dead qualifies as the Bible's "prehistory", not to mention that it arguably reflects a great deal of the Bible's purpose. Although I suppose we could go on pretending that the Bible is a completely original and self-contained work. Even if considering other works (such as the Egyptian book of the dead and the code of Ur-Nammu) might lend some additional context, and thus further our understanding of the Biblical material.

But as you wish. I shall now depart this thread and allow its participants to filter their education as desired.
edit on 10-4-2014 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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ATTENTION:

Asking that a thread remain on topic is not only reasonable, it's a requirement. Please keep replies on topic to avoid more post removals and possible posting bans.

Blaine91555
Forum Moderator

Do not reply to this post.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 02:55 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Agreed.

You just need to do a little research on the Council of Nicea to understand the purposes of the bible as most know it today.

That doesn't mean Constantine was a bad leader - on the contrary, he strived mightily to bring as many peoples together as he could for all the right reasons. His intentions were good, but we all know that the road to hell is paved with good intentions.

It also doesn't mean there aren't some great truths in the bible. But finding them in the jumbled mess that is the present day bible (King James or otherwise) is quite a challenge.

But if you're really looking for truth, some books of the bible are far better than others.

The best, is also the first - Genesis.

The last, is also the worst - Revelations.

At least there's some symmetry there...



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


I think it's an interesting idea. I'll have to examine just exactly what would be involved in following this course, but at the moment, I'm still only working half days and have my afternoons open. At the moment, this looks interesting. I'd be up for it.

I'm not sure how we would coordinate this. It might work better to either have our own thread or forum area if we got enough people interested in it.

I've been thinking a general book club would also be interesting, but not necessarily just one dedicated to spiritual literature. Imagine how eclectic it could get with the group of people that post on this forum in general.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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reply to post by ketsuko
 


Since Moses was an Egyptian, supposedly raised in the school of the elite in Egyptian magic and philosophy, I don't see how you can exclude the blatant influences of the Egyptian laws and rituals embedded in the Old and New testaments. Even Jesus was a "modern" answer to the Horus myth.

Things like baptism and communion come from the Egyptian/Eleusinian mystery schools and are related to Ptolemy's Serapis, a popular "Christ" deity before, during and after the advent of Jesus.




edit on 10-4-2014 by windword because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:21 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


Because we're talking about the course in question ... not your theories or anyone else's. Now, if it comes up in the course, it's relevant.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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reply to post by ketsuko
 


I was hoping others would be interested, it wont necessarily be threatening to what others believe since they are going to delve into other ancient text as well.

Hope you and others find the time to participate.

For instance


Course Syllabus
Week 1: The Riddle That Has Yet To Be Solved
The Bible's Purpose
Books in Ancient Religions

Books in Ancient religion I am looking forward to.



Week 3:
Creating a Shared Past and Common Ancestors


Week 4:
Comparatives Cases: From the Crow Nation to Jane Austen, I wonder what this one is about.

Week 5:
Divine Knowledge for the People, Not Solely the King
The Reason Why Biblical Writings Survived Catastrophes

Week 6: Covenant and Kinship
The Rise of Empires


Week 7:
The Bible's Radical Theology




edit on 033030p://bThursday2014 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by ketsuko
 





How and why was the Bible written? Drawing on the latest archeological research and a wide range of comparative texts, - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...


How and why was the Bible written? It, supposedly, was originally written by Moses, an Egyptian. The Torah can be compared with the Egyptian Book of the Dead, and the New Testament reflects the influence of many Pyramid texts. That is relevant to how and why the Bible was compiled.

The Code of Hammurabi is laced throughout the Old Testament, and Jesus even quotes from the pilfered text of the Hammurabi Code when he says:


Ye have heard that it hath been said, An eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth:


That is a direct influence of Babylonian Law in the Bible.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by windword
 


I know all these thing Windword, lets wait until the course and see what it offers on such subjects,



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


I don't have time for online courses right now but will be following this thread in hopes of gleaning insights of the members who do take the course. Sounds like good beginning questions for any study of the Bible.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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Stormdancer777
Week 4:
Comparatives Cases: From the Crow Nation to Jane Austen, I wonder what this one is about.

That whole week is on the subject of "heroes", so I think you can expect a comparison between "Running Wolf" and Mr.Darcy as cultural hero-figures, perhaps with a discussion of where Moses and David fit into the spectrum.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Hi Storm.


Have you actually signed up for this yet? I was wondering if it was totally free, and all done online, or if you have to buy extra course material to study from. It doesn't mention that on the page. Wondered if it told you anything after you had registered. Thanks.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 04:28 PM
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MissBeck
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Hi Storm.


Have you actually signed up for this yet? I was wondering if it was totally free, and all done online, or if you have to buy extra course material to study from. It doesn't mention that on the page. Wondered if it told you anything after you had registered. Thanks.


Yes I did sign up, never thought of that, maybe I should check my email, I will go check and see if there is anything.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 04:28 PM
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DISRAELI

Stormdancer777
Week 4:
Comparatives Cases: From the Crow Nation to Jane Austen, I wonder what this one is about.

That whole week is on the subject of "heroes", so I think you can expect a comparison between "Running Wolf" and Mr.Darcy as cultural hero-figures, perhaps with a discussion of where Moses and David fit into the spectrum.


OH, TY



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 04:36 PM
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MissBeck
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Hi Storm.


Have you actually signed up for this yet? I was wondering if it was totally free, and all done online, or if you have to buy extra course material to study from. It doesn't mention that on the page. Wondered if it told you anything after you had registered. Thanks.


The email didn't say anything specific.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


I guess I'm always wary when people claim something is free.
I've seen other online courses claiming to be free, then they drop a bombshell.
I'm tempted to do this course myself.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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MissBeck
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


I guess I'm always wary when people claim something is free.
I've seen other online courses claiming to be free, then they drop a bombshell.
I'm tempted to do this course myself.


well, I hope it is free, lol, or I wont be doing it.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


From the course overview:



Nowhere else in the ancient world do we witness such an elaborate effort first to portray the history of one’s own defeat and then to use this history as a means of envisioning a new political order. This course takes students through the bold moves, as well as the intricate steps, with which the Bible achieves its goals.


Yeah, I'm thinking that this course will be extremely bias, just focusing on the Old Testament first. The Bible isn't one cohesive book, or one story. For one thing, the Bible we have today is a selective group of books that nowhere near resembles what was really going on in ancient Jewish town, cities and settlement.

Our present Bible leaves out books like The Jubilees, the Book of Jasher, the Book of Enoch and many others, which were really important in understanding the Bible culture better. The book of Isaiah has been added to in the prophet's name, hundreds of years later.

The two school of "Yahweh vs Elohim" confuse the texts throughout. In actuality, early Hebrews were polytheistic, as the Song of Moses, found with the Dead Sea Scrolls revealed, and exposed the editing of Deuteronomy, as well as Psalms 82, to reflect otherwise.

I highly doubt that this course will discuss these discrepancies based on the course description. I fear it's just more brainwashing from fundamentalists.

Sorry






edit on 10-4-2014 by windword because: (no reason given)




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