How To Keep Raw Meat From Contaminating Surfaces

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posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by TinkerHaus
 


As I said, letting a piece of meat for an hour or two certainly doesn't bother me.

And I am a big fan of the results of the Maillard reaction.

I had an ex-wife that thought that browning ground meat meant heating it until it was not pink any more, but not actually browning it. I enjoy the browned taste, but I still love a piece of quality beef when it is raw.




posted on Apr, 13 2014 @ 03:51 AM
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reply to post by soulpowertothendegree
 

Like all the previous posters, I will warn against plasticizers. But, I also know that most name-brand plastic wraps and baggies no longer use plasticizers but rather rely on pvc which appears to be safe. And, it is/has been studied in recent years especially with the growing popularity of sous vide cooking. But, some of the less expensive plastic wraps still use plasticizers in their production. Never, ever use the packaging that food is wrapped in from the market (unless the item comes in a boiling/microwavable steaming pouch). I doubt the stores invest in the safe plastic to wrap their meats. Rewrap that sort of food in products that state that they are microwave safe.

Keeping it simple though, contamination is easily avoidable. I, myself, keep about half a dozen dishwasher safe plastic cutting mats on hand. They store in a drawer and only cost about $2 each. I use one and then it goes into the dishwasher for a washing and a heat dry.

Thawing outside of the fridge is questionable, I suppose. Years ago, I needed to thaw a frozen turkey quickly. I found the cold water thawing directions on the USDA website. I use that method frequently to this day. Not just for turkeys. Food stays in a water-proof package and is submerged in cold tap water. Replace the water every 30 mins. (Actually I've moved on to a quicker method - food in a waterproof package in a large dish in the sink. Fill dish with cold tap water and leave a cold stream running into the dish. Convection speeds the thawing process).





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