How the Internet is Making it Harder to Read Books

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posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 04:39 AM
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reply to post by darkbake
 


An interesting webcomic addressed your point once using excepts from previous things people wrote:

xkcd.com...

Things haven't really changed.




posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 



Fiction can be a wonderful teacher



Thanks for that, Char-Lee.

I have a bit more formal education than most, but I'd say that I have learnt more from being a lifelong story-book addict than I have through formal instruction. Of course, you can also be frightfully misinformed by reading fiction. It takes discrimination to sort out truth from, well, fiction, and you need to verify what you learn before you make any serious use of it. But these things should go without saying.

By the way, reading fiction is educational, but it can't beat writing fiction. Amazing the amount of research even a simple short story takes.

On topic: of course using the internet 'changes our brains'. Everything we do changes our brains. Look at how much learning to read, and reading, changes us. To hear some folk here talk, you'd think babies are born with the ability to read.



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 07:11 PM
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Komeda
reply to post by darkbake
 


Whenever I see people reading a Kindle or a NOOK I feel a little sad. I don't want 3-D printed books to become obsolete. I like to write notes by hand in the book margins as I read. I like the smell of an old book, flipping the pages of a book, curling up with a good book on a rainy weekend.


I'm right there with you on this!



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 07:44 PM
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benrl
Fahrenheit 451 here we come,
do we have 10 and 15 min tv shows yet...


The Eric Andre Show (the height of satire imnho)

Children's Hospital

....among others



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 08:54 PM
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I think it depends on how you are doing the using.

I know when I sit down to read something, be it an article or a thread, I intend to devour it all. Plenty of times, I ignore threads I might otherwise find interesting simply because they've stretched out past a point where I want to wade through that many pages, and it feels wrong to me to try to wade in mid-thread. Similarly, I will sometimes unknowingly spend the larger part of an afternoon reading an article and then getting swallowed by the no-man's-land of the comments underneath because I didn't realize how long they were and wanted to know what others were thinking about it ... and, oops! Lookee there, I just spent the better part of two or three hours doing that ...

I also read books voraciously, cover to cover, more than once. And I read quickly enough that a new book usually takes me a couple of days to finish off the first time around.

But the thing that I have noticed that has changed my reading pattern the most is my job. I've been proofreading now since 2008. And it changes you. The very first thing my eye notices about anything I read is a mistake, and you have no idea how distracting that can be, especially when that's the last thing I want. For example, I really mostly could care less about how anyone spells or punctuates here because I know I'm hardly perfect and don't expend an inordinate amount of time trying to be. I'd rather absorb the point being made and think about it, but nnnOOOOOoooo, I have to latch onto every little mistake first.

Honestly, it's the same with published books, internet articles, anything ... At work, this is enormously useful, everywhere else, no so much.

So, yes, your pattern of reading and how you try to comprehend, what you're looking for, what kind of habits you develop, all of that can train your brain over time and retraining those habits is hard.
edit on 9-4-2014 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)
edit on 9-4-2014 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 09:00 PM
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Aazadan
reply to post by darkbake
 


An interesting webcomic addressed your point once using excepts from previous things people wrote:

xkcd.com...

Things haven't really changed.


that was worth a star

and a beer
@ Katsuko
being a sound/recording tech, among other things, i do the same with music production...
its a real pain in the ear sometimes too
edit on Wedpm4b20144America/Chicago39 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 09:13 PM
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benrl

do we have 10 and 15 min tv shows yet...


Actually i think we are pretty close to that. I have counted some shows as having 40 minutes of advertising and 20 minutes of material. Football is 1 hour of play time and 3 hours of advertising. Hence i stopped watching tv when my son was born and ATS ofcourse. No time to pay to be marketed.

There is some advantage to internet or electronic learning , it allows for a need to learn approach and endless information to reference .



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 11:24 PM
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I have to agree with this. The internet causes us to be impatient and inattentive. We expect everything to come at the click of a button. We don't want to read anything complex because computers have taught us not to think.

We're the one-click, 90-seconds around-the-world news soundbite generation. If something isn't one-click or can't fit in a 5-second soundbite, it's not wanted.

Real analysis? Real studying? Real understanding?? Real spell checking? Not for us. That's too old fashioned. We're modern and superior to all that.

Math by hand? Nooooooo. Math by calculator! S a m e ... p r o b l e m.

Telephones have probably changed us too. Think about it. When you talk to someone on the phone, you're not "listening" to the emotions on their face or the gestures they use. There's no opportunity to comment about their clothes or makeup. For all we know, smelling might be just as important as seeing the emotions on a face. In any case, on a phone, we're disconnected from these things.

All this technology is a grand human experiment with unknown consequences.
edit on 10-4-2014 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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Aazadan
reply to post by darkbake
 


An interesting webcomic addressed your point once using excepts from previous things people wrote:

xkcd.com...

Things haven't really changed.


That is good, I forgot about it, but I have read it before. I'll go ahead and embed it.



Found by Aazadan
edit on 09pmWed, 09 Apr 2014 23:46:30 -0500kbpmkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by ketsuko
 


Thanks for sharing, Ketsuko. I am glad you still find time to enjoy reading and getting into things even with a job.

@Danbones - I do audio work as well in the studio and it is quite interesting how my ear has developed over the years. Now when I listen to songs on the radio, it is a lot more interesting! I honestly don't find many errors, but I do notice a lot of cool things in produced music.
edit on 09pmWed, 09 Apr 2014 23:51:02 -0500kbpmkAmerica/Chicago by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 10:02 PM
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darkbake
That is good, I forgot about it, but I have read it before. I'll go ahead and embed it.


What I like most are the quotes from 1871 and 1908. At a 37 year gap the quote from 1871 could easily have been given by the 1908 writers grandfather.
edit on 10-4-2014 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 10:11 PM
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Web use is linked to loneliness, low moods and the loss of real-life friends: “The more a person hangs out in the global village, the worse they are likely to feel”. So many people feel this way, yet it appears that this wonderful “connectivity” and expanded “social network” may be a devastating illusion. It goes without saying that our new online world has blessed us beyond imagination, but we need to find a balance between enjoying the benefits and minimizing the very real potential damage.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 03:20 AM
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jackj
Web use is linked to loneliness, low moods and the loss of real-life friends: “The more a person hangs out in the global village, the worse they are likely to feel”. So many people feel this way, yet it appears that this wonderful “connectivity” and expanded “social network” may be a devastating illusion. It goes without saying that our new online world has blessed us beyond imagination, but we need to find a balance between enjoying the benefits and minimizing the very real potential damage.


Really? The more I get to see the opinions of a diverse group of people that can challenge my preconceived ideas the better I feel. My best days are the days someone can convince me that I'm wrong.



posted on Apr, 11 2014 @ 09:46 AM
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To me, most book are slow, boring and usually contain very subjective information written by a single writer or writers with the same basic ideas. With critical thinking. I don`t understand how people would believe a single book more than the never ending information from the internet.

Humans adapt to function optimally in their environment. While some of you see people getting stupid, I see people getting better in the world they must live in.



posted on Apr, 12 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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Okay, so you're sitting on your bed and you're about to start reading a book that caught your interest. You read the summary on the back and decide to get going. Halfway through the first chapter and your phone beeps - you have a message on some social media website! You stop reading and check the message. Or maybe you're reading a book online on this neat website you found. You start reading, get a few paragraphs in and then suddenly your mind wanders off and without realizing it you've opened a new tab in your web browser and you're watching videos or chatting with a friend, completely forgetting about the book you were reading until you're closing out of the tabs.

The internet is a useful tool, but it is also a distraction.

How can one focus on reading, playing an instrument, or anything else that requires patience and attention to be able to do so when they're surrounded by distractions that are quick, easy, and everywhere.

I feel like if someone is interested in reading books, they will. Those who aren't interested won't bother regardless of the internet (unless they prefer reading online).

However, I've known people who used to love reading but now spend all of their time checking their social media, obsessing about the likes on their photos, and other mindless things that don't really matter. If I asked my younger siblings to read a book, they would probably laugh, call me a loser, and just go back to taking "selfies". It legit scares me.



posted on May, 14 2014 @ 04:15 PM
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I've always thought that the rise of technology and the internet has greatly impacted a person's learning capacity. I was raised on books--I watched 30mins of TV a day at max, and wasn't allowed anything past that until I was nearly 13. Now I work in a public library.

I moved from a very wealthy town to a very poor town and spent days wandering the high school wondering where everyone's personal reading material was. In fact, the first person that I saw with a book was in the lunch line and promptly made an ass of myself by exclaiming "OH MY GOD, YOU READ!"

(He later married me.)





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