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U.S. Navy says it can now convert seawater into fuel

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posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 02:26 AM
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reply to post by interupt42
 


Good find sir
s&f

Maybe this will put an end to oil wars!




posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 02:36 AM
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There is a long way to go before this is a viable energy source.

New Scientist

edit on 8-4-2014 by joemensor because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 05:00 AM
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A couple things to clear up for anyone who thinks this might be some great new breakthrough for average, everyday people...

There is a reason this is considered useful, and primarily because of the military application. Nothing really new here. A fuel cell with two different catalysts. Nickel and Iron.

So unless you plan on stocking up on nickel and iron, it's not something you are going to see in your own car. The only reason the Navy wants it is because the advantage of ditching the supply chain for regular fuel. (A major weakness.)

It is not efficient nor cheap, but if they can refuel less often, or not at all on a mission, it makes it useful.


The predicted cost of jet fuel using these technologies is in the range of $3-$6 per gallon, and with sufficient funding and partnerships, this approach could be commercially viable within the next seven to ten years.


Mind you, $3-6/Gallon is likely their cost running in their own fleet. Not even close to retail, since it hasn't been touched by wholesalers and retailers. Which means it is not competitive to traditional fuel.

Also consider how much Nickel and Iron might be needed plus the additional cost if it was widespread.

www.dailymail.co.uk... ater.html


The NRL process begins by extracting carbon dioxide and hydrogen from seawater.

As seawater passes through a sepcially built cell, it is subjected to a small electric current.

This causes the seawater to exchange hydrogen ions produced at the anode with sodium ions.

As a result, the seawater is acidified.

Meanwhile, at the cathode, the water is reduced to hydrogen gas and sodium hydroxide is formed.

The end product is hydrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and the sodium hydroxide is added to the leftover seawater to neutralize its acidity.

In the next step, the hydrogen and carbon dioxide are passed into a heated reaction chamber with an iron catalyst.

The gases combine and form long-chained unsaturated hydrocarbons with methane as a by-product.

The unsaturated hydrocarbons are then made to form longer hydrocarbon molecules containing six to nine carbon atoms.

Using a nickel-supported catalyst, these are then converted into jet fuel.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 06:40 AM
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reply to post by interupt42
 


awesome....
so ocean will not be free anymore in the future


peace



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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There are several technologies that can provide fuel for ships that may be more efficient than this technology.

There is a microwave tech that can convert seawater directly into usable fuel, oxyhydrogen, without all the extra steps that this one involves.

In its most basic form, an RF emitter (microwave energy), powered by onboard electrical sources, bombards seawater and causes it to produce hydrogen (no electrodes) and oxygen, which recombine and release energy in the presence of the continuous radio field.

This fuel can be injected directly into diesel engines as a primary fuel, without the need for resupply ships etc.

Here's YT video clip describing the process:



Of course, this is NOT overunity, free energy or anything approaching it, it takes electrical energy, lots of it, to produce this effect. But then again, so does the Navy's new process, and with a lot more intermediate steps than this one does.

Another technology that may have potential, especially for ships and boats, is the relatively unknown 'plastic / hydrocarbons to oil (diesel and gas) technologies that are around.

This takes any hydrocarbon containing source, waste plastics primarily but can be used car tyres and any old crud containing hydrocarbons that is discarded, expose them to a barrage of microwave radio energy (up to 1200 different frequencies depending on the hydrocarbons being subjected) which reduced the waste into usable oil, diesel and combustable gas.

One type of device, the 'Hawk-10', can take an average standard used car tyre and extract the following (approx):

4.5 Litres of Diesel oil
1.4 Litres of combustable gas
3.4Kg of Carbon Black (many uses, electronics, radar absorbtion pigments and lots more)

New Scientist 2007

Considering we now have ocean wide contamination from dumped and discarded plastics, literal plastic islands forming from this waste are estimated to be as large as the Austrailian continent..or twice the size the state of Texas, at the very least, ships can use this technology to fuel an ocean clean up, the Navy could use this tech using a 'fuel' of ground up waste plastics, and can 'refuel' from scooping up the vast amounts of floating plastics in the oceans.



These are just a couple of the technologies that can be used to produce fuel for shipping with minimal modification and adjustment of existing engines and systems, they're not free energy and have nothing to do with it, but they would be able to make use of existing electrical suppplies on ships to produce a fuel not too dissimilar to the fuel required to run them at present, and far more conveniently and cheaply than having to resupply or make scheduled port calls to refuel.

Plus, in the case of the massive islands of floating plastics, they'd be cleaning the oceans as they went and not polluting them.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 07:05 AM
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They "discovered" hydrogen gas from water?

Wowsers. Well Sweden was going to reformat their gas industry years ago and transform it to hydrogen fuel. I never understood how they got bullied into dropping and don't understand why when we go to the pump, we don't have a choice between methane, and hydrogen. And extremely cheap fuel.

However, this is one of the back yard garage energy type work going on. People have been doing this for years, creating energy from water, and Bob Lazar has as well.

Certainly not new information. I have a thread on this.
edit on 8-4-2014 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by interupt42
 


I Would suspect the next step would be to put a refinery on an aircraft carrier.
The we would truely have a world wide navy.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 07:47 AM
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xuenchen
...Maybe the process could help the (alleged) CO2 imbalance in the air...


Sure, as long as they don't use (burn) that fuel.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 07:53 AM
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Unity_99
They "discovered" hydrogen gas from water?

Wowsers. Well Sweden was going to reformat their gas industry years ago and transform it to hydrogen fuel.


No. Not just hydrogen, but also carbon dioxide, both of which are then run through a process that can create liquid hydrocarbon fuel (something like gas/petrol).

And, yes -- extracting hydrogen from water through electrolysis has been around a while. Most hydrogen fuel used around the world is made this way. Hydrogen Fuel cells, for example, run on hydrogen that has mostly been extracted from water.

So yeah, extracting hydrogen from water is not new -- but this article is not talking about just extracting hydrogen.


edit on 4/8/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by interupt42
 


I think this was someone else's invention. Didn't the disappear him or something? The guy with the dune buggy.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 08:05 AM
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Unity_99

Certainly not new information. I have a thread on this.


It helps if you read more than the thread title.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by darkstar57
 


Last night when searching I wasn't able to find to many sources so I won't disagree that it might be a farce. However, as Grimpachi stated they will probably be using nuclear energy being as they are the Navy.

For the Navy that appears to make sense, again as Grimpachi pointed out "They could produce a gallon now for about $6 which is way better than what they are paying at $50 to $60" .


edit on 36430America/ChicagoTue, 08 Apr 2014 08:36:16 -0500up3042 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 08:40 AM
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teamcommander
reply to post by interupt42
 


I Would suspect the next step would be to put a refinery on an aircraft carrier.
The we would truely have a world wide navy.


I would think so as well.

Depending on the energy source and efficiency to do the conversion I would think the ideal situation would be for each ship to include their own refinery to do away with refueling all together. However, a dedicated refinery on an aircraft carrier would still be huge step .



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 08:41 AM
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Bilk22
reply to post by interupt42
 


I think this was someone else's invention. Didn't the disappear him or something? The guy with the dune buggy.


This is different, because it's not bull#.

They're not magically turning water into fuel. They're taking the water apart, filtering out the CO2, taking it apart, and putting together hydrocarbons the hard way.

That takes a huge amount of energy input. More than you'll get out of it by burning the fuel. So the Navy's using nuclear reactors for energy input. It's not efficient. But it's better (maybe) than shipping fuel around.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by MysterX
 


One of the key benefits of this method is that they would have to do very little modifications to existing system.




That means none of the ships making up the Navy’s full fleet will need to be retrofitted or updated to use the fuel.
Read more: dailycaller.com...



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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Bedlam

Bilk22
reply to post by interupt42
 


I think this was someone else's invention. Didn't the disappear him or something? The guy with the dune buggy.


This is different, because it's not bull#.

They're not magically turning water into fuel. They're taking the water apart, filtering out the CO2, taking it apart, and putting together hydrocarbons the hard way.

That takes a huge amount of energy input. More than you'll get out of it by burning the fuel. So the Navy's using nuclear reactors for energy input. It's not efficient. But it's better (maybe) than shipping fuel around.
Well if I remember correctly, that's exactly what the dune buggy guy did. He even used a microwave if I remember correctly.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 09:08 AM
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Seems like they've been working on this for a while


science.dodlive.mil...



The major component of the carbon capture skid is a three-chambered electrochemical acidification cell. This cell uses small quantities of electricity to exchange hydrogen ions produced at the anode with sodium ions in the seawater stream. As a result, the seawater is acidified.

At the cathode, water is reduced to H2 gas and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is formed. This basic solution may be re-combined with the acidified seawater to return the seawater to its original pH with no additional chemicals. Current and continuing research using this carbon capture skid demonstrates the continuous efficient production of H2 and the recovery of up to 92 percent of CO2 from seawater.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 10:02 AM
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Bilk22

Bedlam

Bilk22
reply to post by interupt42
 


I think this was someone else's invention. Didn't the disappear him or something? The guy with the dune buggy.


This is different, because it's not bull#.

They're not magically turning water into fuel. They're taking the water apart, filtering out the CO2, taking it apart, and putting together hydrocarbons the hard way.

That takes a huge amount of energy input. More than you'll get out of it by burning the fuel. So the Navy's using nuclear reactors for energy input. It's not efficient. But it's better (maybe) than shipping fuel around.
Well if I remember correctly, that's exactly what the dune buggy guy did. He even used a microwave if I remember correctly.


You are thinking of Stanley Meyer and he used electricity to extract the hydrogen. And his dune buddy did run on it.
edit on 8-4-2014 by buster2010 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by interupt42
 


Only the carriers and subs use nuclear energy. It's not efficient to make most of the surface fleet nuclear powered. They did have a nuclear powered cruiser for years, but the last non-carrier nuclear powered surface combat ship has been gone for awhile now IIRC. Everything else requires fuel, although the newer ships are usually powered by a gas turbine, which is much more efficient, and provides a lot more power.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 10:14 AM
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Should maybe asking what the sand and Gold connection is lol



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