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French scientists are working on an acoustic earthquake shield......!!...??

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posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 08:56 PM
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I will admit I have never been in an Earthquake and probably would not enjoy the experience// The below method of bore holes to create a harmonic shield from earthquakes IMO is so far outside my understanding of how things work I cannot imagine it protecting a city; especially with all the different depths and forms of earth shaking...Cars being thrown on their sides and people unable to stand in really bad ones... Just can not figure out how this would work unless the boreholes are miles deep.... and even then "I don't think it will work"... Maybe someone can enlighten us?

www.theverge.com...


A group of French scientists has developed a method of shielding cities from the force of an earthquake, and after devastating earthquakes in Chile, the idea is drawing some much-deserved attention. It works on the principle of refraction, planting an array of boreholes to redirect the reverberations around the city and into areas where they will do less damage. If the system works, it could be a new way to shield populated areas from the devastating effects of an earthquake.




posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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I had trouble stepping out of the shower last week when we had the 5.1 here in LA

I dont understand how sound could stop the plates physically subducting!



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 09:05 PM
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Very interesting. They need to find a way to use the stored energy to be used for consumable energy.

Considering how many earthquakes occur throughout Earth daily, I would imagine there is heaps of money to be made from this down the road. It's funny how the idea is to save people but nefarious individuals will become filthy rich from the tech.



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 09:06 PM
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I have no clue how it works but I find it amazing! Following thread in hopes someone smarter than me can enlighten us.



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 09:15 PM
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Its all energy in one form or another, kinetic, acoustic, etc.

If you can diffuse it, or channel it on a large enough scale you could dampen the effects of a quake.

I would imagine its geo-engineering on a massive scale, but as we advance, expect to see more of it.

ETA:

Okay, so imagine you have a stone slab in your yard, drill holes all around it, and fill it with slurry or mud, or even leave them open.

Drop a bowling ball near by, do it in two areas, one with the holes, one with out.

I imagine, the air, or material in the holes, with give, would dampen the shock to the area the holes surround.
edit on 7-4-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 09:21 PM
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Here are some diagrams that help to explain it in detail a little more:


Figure 1: Schematics of (a) a seismic wave in an alluvium basin and (b) the seismic testing device cross section in the x-z plane (see Fig. 3 for a photograph of the experiment).

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Figure 2: Simulated dispersion curves [frequency versus Bloch wave number describing the reduced Brillouin zone of vertices Γ=(0,0), X=(π/d,π/d), M=(π/d,0)] for a periodic plate of pitch d=1.73  m and thickness 5 m, with inclusions of diameter 0.32 m and density about 1/1000 that of the surrounding medium (soil). The inset shows the plot of flexural wave [i.e., displacement in the x-z plane in Fig. 1(b)] intensity for a forcing at 50 Hz (frequency in the second partial stop band along XM), which is located as in Fig. 4.

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Figure 3: Photograph of the seismic metamaterial experiment from Ménard company (see the Supplemental Material [40] for more photos and a movie [41]). The three dashed perimeters account for the location of sensors [measuring the three components of wave velocity (green area on this photograph)], seismic metamaterial [5 m deep self-stable holes of diameter 0.32 m with center-to-center spacing of 1.73 m (blue area)], and rotating source (a vibrating probe set on a crane) with a horizontal displacement of 0.014 m generating an elastic wave at frequency 50 Hz

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Figure 4 :Measurements for a monochromatic source. Experimental results’ map after interpolation between sensors: (a) the difference (J2−J1) and (b) ratio (J2/J1, with image magnification on the metamaterial) of the measured energy field (arbitrary units) after (J2) and before (J1) carrying out the boreholes. Note that the dark blue region in panel (b) has 5 times less elastic energy after we carried out the boreholes. Note also the small values of J1 about 10 meters away from the source (viscoelastic soil) make J2/J1 artificially high on the upper edge of the map, and should be disregarded. Black rectangles symbolize sensors, white circles symbolize the holes, and the red cross symbolizes the source.

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source




edit on 4/7/2014 by mcx1942 because: fix



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 09:21 PM
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"The trick will be to find a way to absorb the massive energy of a major earthquake — or find a better place to send it."

www.theverge.com...
Ehhhyuup!



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 10:03 PM
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mcx1942
Here are some diagrams that help to explain it in detail a little more:


Figure 1: Schematics of (a) a seismic wave in an alluvium basin and (b) the seismic testing device cross section in the x-z plane (see Fig. 3 for a photograph of the experiment).

1:



Figure 2: Simulated dispersion curves [frequency versus Bloch wave number describing the reduced Brillouin zone of vertices Γ=(0,0), X=(π/d,π/d), M=(π/d,0)] for a periodic plate of pitch d=1.73  m and thickness 5 m, with inclusions of diameter 0.32 m and density about 1/1000 that of the surrounding medium (soil). The inset shows the plot of flexural wave [i.e., displacement in the x-z plane in Fig. 1(b)] intensity for a forcing at 50 Hz (frequency in the second partial stop band along XM), which is located as in Fig. 4.

2:



Figure 3: Photograph of the seismic metamaterial experiment from Ménard company (see the Supplemental Material [40] for more photos and a movie [41]). The three dashed perimeters account for the location of sensors [measuring the three components of wave velocity (green area on this photograph)], seismic metamaterial [5 m deep self-stable holes of diameter 0.32 m with center-to-center spacing of 1.73 m (blue area)], and rotating source (a vibrating probe set on a crane) with a horizontal displacement of 0.014 m generating an elastic wave at frequency 50 Hz

3:



Figure 4 :Measurements for a monochromatic source. Experimental results’ map after interpolation between sensors: (a) the difference (J2−J1) and (b) ratio (J2/J1, with image magnification on the metamaterial) of the measured energy field (arbitrary units) after (J2) and before (J1) carrying out the boreholes. Note that the dark blue region in panel (b) has 5 times less elastic energy after we carried out the boreholes. Note also the small values of J1 about 10 meters away from the source (viscoelastic soil) make J2/J1 artificially high on the upper edge of the map, and should be disregarded. Black rectangles symbolize sensors, white circles symbolize the holes, and the red cross symbolizes the source.

4:



source




edit on 4/7/2014 by mcx1942 because: fix


Thank you for adding the diagrams and explanation to the thread. I think understand the principle being investigated however, I still find it very hard to believe this method will work... Maybe to many earthquake movies where the ground looks like someone grabbed the end of a blanket and pulled it up and down rapidly creating something like waves in an ocean only this time it is the very earth we stand upon... I may need to start a new business; Sky whole hole drilling " you point where and how deep, we poke and hope you like it" !



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 10:52 AM
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In theory it would work on the small ones, but on the bigger ones your dealing with alot stronger forces.
Could possibly make the bigger ones less intense but thats about it.
Not a bad idea actually



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