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You might be seeing this on a 15-second delay: study

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posted on Mar, 19 2015 @ 11:32 PM
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"It also means that what you see around you - that cup of coffee, the face of your co-worker, your computer screen - may be a time-averaged composite of now and the past. "

BULL#, lol

What happens is that our brains can't perceive everything in the same time (when you are too much tired or disinterested about what you are seeing) then, the brain ignores what you are seeing (even though, you're still seeing EVERYTHING in the image, but not perceiving). That's why this 'continuity field' only works when objects are too close from each other, because you can't perceive 'them all' too fast to perceive it.. but after 10 seconds it may be easy for your brain to perceive the changes it and to form a memory about it [and the researchers are smart, they put images that is VERY difficult to perceive the changes. They just want fame, serious, this experiment is SO FAKE.]
www.youtube.com...
If you watch this video, you will see how 'dumb' these researchers are, the images are changing so fast, and the changes are ridiculous small, that no one in the world would be able to perceive the changes. When the image is changed, you saw this with your eyes, but you didn't perceive it with your "vision perception".
That's why they say: -this experiment only works if objects are close to each other, obvious lol, if objects are far, It's more easy for you to perceive the changes, it depends on how you are in the day, if you take energetic drinks,will be easier to realize the changes, because you are going to be "more 'active" [how can someone take this experiment so seriously? It's a joke, a load of bollocks]
Summarizing: 10-15 seconds delay is Bull#, there is no delay in creating images. The image was always there. What is true is only your delay to perceive these little changes in the experiemtn (and that does not need to be necessarily 10 seconds, It can be 2, 3, 7, 15 seconds.. it depends)
edit on 19-3-2015 by daramantus because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-3-2015 by daramantus because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-3-2015 by daramantus because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 20 2015 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: daaskapital

I do a lot of game programming, a good portion of which involves writing physics code, calculating where objects are, the forces on them, etc. Then I have to code what is shown. When I write this code a large part of what I'm doing is similar to this. Computers are only so fast, and that means that rather than calculate the exact positions for objects, light, shadows, and so on I must often times estimate them and then only produce exact values when a specific item is being focused on. For example estimating the location of an arrow along a path, and then calculating it exactly when it is close to striking an object.

There's a famous example with the fast inverse square root. All of the evidence points to the idea that our eyes estimate the position of objects from moment to moment and then create a composite image of where we believe things to be. It's very much like a computer.



posted on Mar, 25 2015 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: daaskapital


We're not seeing things on a delay so much as this being more like interpolation, or your brain focusing on what's changed rather than what HASN'T.


Video compression techniques use a very similar method, where rather than each frame being 1million+ pixels each with a hex color code, it actually just repeats the previous frame with an update for which pixels have actually CHANGED



originally posted by: Asktheanimals
Does this mean we only slam on our brakes when the 10 second "averaging" seems inclined towards an imminent accident?
I don't buy this study at all.
Like most science these days it looks at small phenomena in isolation then makes inferences on things outside of the study to infer broader implications that often don't exist.


Exactly.
edit on 25-3-2015 by 8675309jenny because: (no reason given)



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