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How To End TBTF? Do What Vietnam Does: Sentence Bankers To Death By Firing Squad

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posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:06 PM
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For the past five years, one of the most theatrical topics of superficially deep debate by both regulators and legislators has been a simple one: how to end the abuse of power and relentless gambling with zero fear of consequences by systemically important, Too Big To Fail banks, which led to the unprecedented 2008 spectacle of Goldman's Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson demanding that Congress give him a blank check to bail out anyone and anything (mostly his former employers) he deems fit.


How To End TBTF? Do What Vietnam Does: Sentence Bankers To Death By Firing Squad

I can remember back in the late 60's my grandfather and dad used to complain about the fact that the white collared criminals were never charged nor prosecuted for their crimes, somethings never change I guess. But it's past time for Big Crimes to get big punishment, while executions might be overboard, it would make them think before stealing from the people.


Unlike in America, where judges can’t sentence white-collar criminals to death, Vietnam can execute its citizens for a range of corporate crimes.

Amnesty International reports that death sentences in Vietnam have been handed down to criminals for running shady investment schemes, counterfeiting cash and even defaulting on loans. This is unusual: United Nations officials have condemned death for “economic crimes” yet Vietnam persists with these sentences — as does neighboring China.




posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:18 PM
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well, from a strictly ethical stand point I think the death penalty is absurd.

Now, equal penalty for crime?

Thats something else, statue codes mean a lot in the justice system.

Things like Grand Theft auto, vs Embezzlement, even when the dollar amount is higher on the 2nd one the sentence is not.

Their is certainly a great disparity in the legal code biased against what seems to be a socio-economic divide, something that should most definitely be addressed.

So, yes on addressing the apparent disparity in the legal system, NO on the death penalty, but only on over all objection and not severity of punishment meeting a crime.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by AlaskanDad
 


As I've said before generally I'm against the death penalty. Not in this case though. These bankers have devastated the entire globe with their greed and evil. This needs to happen around the world but won't.

Start with the central banks and work our way down. Middle management doesn't need to suffer for the crimes their superiors have committed.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:29 PM
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Killing them would only bring joy, I think the only just way would be to make them live in the worst kind of poverty. Then again, maybe just killing them is the best way.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:30 PM
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reply to post by AlaskanDad
 

United Nations officials have condemned death for “economic crimes” . . .
I think there should be a moratorium on executions until the time when rich people get executed.
It seems like only really poor people get executed and rich people get completely off.
I think the big criminals woke up after Al Capone died, and bought the entire Congress and the Judiciary to prevent a recurrence.


edit on 5-4-2014 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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jmdewey60
reply to post by AlaskanDad
 

United Nations officials have condemned death for “economic crimes” . . .
I think there should be a moratorium on executions until the time when rich people get executed.
It seems like only really poor people get executed and rich people get completely off.
I think the big criminals woke up after Al Capone died, and bought the entire Congress and the Judiciary to prevent a recurrence.


edit on 5-4-2014 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)


I never noticed that quote! ofcourse the united nations would condemn the chance of being charged with the death penalty



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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AlaskanDad

But it's past time for Big Crimes to get big punishment, while executions might be overboard, it would make them think before stealing from the people.


To any who think that, why would it be overboard? Do people who believe that believe the value of the life of a psychopathic serial lier and deceiver who cannot feel guilt, remorse, or love, is greater than the financial damage, which turns into emotional damage, and some times physical damage, they inflict upon entire nations of people?

Is a human parasite on the body of society somehow greater than any other you would crush under your hand on your own body without a second thought, like a mosquito, or a tick?

Is it too barbaric to call a spade a spade now? Too uncivilized to efficiently dispose of living societal toxic waste?

Sometimes, life is not precious. In fact sometimes it is incredibly deadly, poisonous, and vile.

A bullet through every psychopath bankers head who has demonstrated they are a cancer in the body of society would solve many problems, and would send a clear message to any would-be overreaching psychopaths in a language that they can understand; fear: "Overstep your bounds, and you will be killed".

When their fear becomes stronger than their greed, corruption will stabilize and begin to decline.

Rapidly.

ETA: All within the bounds of the law and fair trials, of course.


edit on 4/5/2014 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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A more severe punishment is warranted than what the system currently doles out. I yet lack the wisdom to say what is should be.

The looming threat of punishment serves as a deterrent. When there is nothing to fear, white collar crime becomes the flavor of the day.

Taxes are up, the Social Security coffer is empty (if you threw out all the IOUs that can't be paid back ... and I'm not happy about some folks who live on yachts and eat caviar at my expense.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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Oooo Wow...

S/F, to begin with.
I'm philosophically against the death penalty, but, I have to admit that there are some people who, in my opinion, should just begone; just go away; disappear; shut up; etc.

I'm for sending them all to a remote uninhabited, unimproved island, with nothing but the suits on their backs and the ties round their necks (like a pistol with one shot)......and let them duke it out amongst themselves. (If not an island on Earth, let them be the chosen ones sent on the one-way trip to Mars)

I know, very "Hunger Games" flavored....but hey.
Millions of people have suffered at their hands. I have no empathy for them. And I can feel empathy for just about any living creature. They reaped what they sowed.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:37 PM
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benrl
well, from a strictly ethical stand point I think the death penalty is absurd.


Of course, but from a practical standpoint it is not. For the U.S and many other western nations I think the cons outweigh the pros. But for some eastern nations that may not be the case. These days financial crimes (and often non-crimes) are still punishable by death, but the thing is it's not federal jurisdiction to carry out that justice. Justice is still served though. In places like Vietnam things could get out of control if they left that jurisdiction outside of government control.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:41 PM
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benrl
well, from a strictly ethical stand point I think the death penalty is absurd.

Now, equal penalty for crime?

Thats something else, statue codes mean a lot in the justice system.

Things like Grand Theft auto, vs Embezzlement, even when the dollar amount is higher on the 2nd one the sentence is not.

Their is certainly a great disparity in the legal code biased against what seems to be a socio-economic divide, something that should most definitely be addressed.

So, yes on addressing the apparent disparity in the legal system, NO on the death penalty, but only on over all objection and not severity of punishment meeting a crime.


I do not think death is an unreasonable crime in a case where the entire country is damaged by the fallout. You think the bankers in the states would of pulled that crap that culminated in 08??? What they did was an act of economic war on the American people, no difference from if another country did it. The executions would show that status, wealth and class will not protect you from retribution.

I mean, I would literally suggest chopping a few up SLOWLY and making the rest watch, it sounds extreme but they would think four times before engineering that crap again.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:45 PM
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reply to post by AlaskanDad
 


I don't support the death penalty but it's absurd how white collar criminals get away with their crimes. If and when these crimes are prosecuted the criminals usually receive minimal prison time, like 2-5 years for stealing millions EVEN billions of dollars! And the men who take the fall are literally the fall guys, who usually state that everyone was committing the same crimes, their bosses included.

So again, I don't support the death penalty but god damn at least one nation isn't just gonna sit idly by & do nothing... but then again wealthy business men & politicians go hand in hand, so we're screwed.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:53 PM
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On7a7higher7plane

benrl
well, from a strictly ethical stand point I think the death penalty is absurd.


Of course, but from a practical standpoint it is not. For the U.S and many other western nations I think the cons outweigh the pros. But for some eastern nations that may not be the case. These days financial crimes (and often non-crimes) are still punishable by death, but the thing is it's not federal jurisdiction to carry out that justice. Justice is still served though. In places like Vietnam things could get out of control if they left that jurisdiction outside of government control.


My one and only problem with its implementation, okay well two, IS first the odds of an innocent being convicted.

That happens, and has been proven to have happened several times just in the last few decades with DNA.

Two, the methods still leave much to be desired, contrary to belief it goes bad, more often than they admit.

IN no way am I saying Financial crime should not be punished as sever as any other property crime.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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United States Is Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading to Poor, UN Report Charges


The U.N. Human Rights Committee in Geneva on Thursday condemned the United States for criminalizing homelessness, calling it "cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment" that violates international human rights treaty obligations. It also called upon the U.S. government to take corrective action, following a two-day review of U.S. government compliance with a human rights treaty ratified in 1992.

"I'm just simply baffled by the idea that people can be without shelter in a country, and then be treated as criminals for being without shelter," said Sir Nigel Rodley, chairman of the committee in closing statements on the U.S. review. "The idea of criminalizing people who don't have shelter is something that I think many of my colleagues might find as difficult as I do to even begin to comprehend."

The Committee called on the U.S. to abolish criminalization of homelessness laws and policies at state and local levels, intensify efforts to find solutions for homeless people in accordance with human rights standards and offer incentives for decriminalization, including giving local authorities funding for implementing alternatives and withholding funding for criminalizing the homeless.

Those recommendations run counter to the current trends in the nation.


What a disgraceful, shameful embarrassment this nation is becoming. It breaks my heart.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:07 PM
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benrl

IN no way am I saying Financial crime should not be punished as sever as any other property crime.


I would put forth that financial crime in the aspect we are talking about is a misnomer. While the crime involves finances, it also incorporates betrayal via lies and deceit.

When a person of a nation betrays the trust of their fellows in such a massive way, that is treason. If the person is not of the nation, than their actions are acts of war.

The only appropriate sentence for such treason (or acts of war) that affects so many with such heinous disregard as to the consequences the nation and its people would suffer that I can conceive of, is death.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:35 PM
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If a bank does wrong in America and you want to kill the offender, you'd have to kill every employee surely because a bank is a corporation and corporations are people!



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:42 PM
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reply to post by AlaskanDad
 


I just think that everybody has something on everybody in the big game that we weren't invited to play.

Even the million march was barely effective, even with the media coverage. Throw a bone, but the more it changes, the more it stays the same.

Recent thread about the fat cow Hillary, incompetence, missing money, ineffectiveness... As if she'll ever pay for it. Sick.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 11:25 PM
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when it becomes as clear as it has that we're all brutally taking it from behind courtesy of greedy, malicious Big Banking, to do anything else is just pathetic and silly and weak. execution is the appropriate course of action. lucky for them, we here in the US are "too civilized" for a real solution to our problems. i can hear them laughing about it now.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 11:48 PM
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Those who will take advantage of other people for money, especially on such a large scale, have no morals or conscience. Therefore we must instill a conscience in them through fear. When one with no morals is allowed to run amok with virtually no consequences, we will see things similar to what occurred before the bailouts. These people are some of the worst kinds of criminals, and there is no way around that fact. They should be punished severely, because this is one instance where punishment would actually act as a deterrent, at least moreso than it does for your average criminal.

And when you get down to the marrow of the issue, what some of these large businesses are doing is akin to treason, and as such, execution is not out of the realm of possibility. They virtually were the cause of our country sinking into a recession, where so many people suffered. Because of the steep consequences for the entire nation, treason seems like a fitting charge. Not to mention the fact that taking advantage of the government, or using the government to further business ends for large firms, IS treason, since it involves an attack against the country itself. An attack on the populace IS an attack on the country, because the people ARE the country.



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 05:27 AM
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reply to post by CaticusMaximus
 

Do people who believe that believe the value of the life of a psychopathic serial lier and deceiver who cannot feel guilt, remorse, or love, is greater than the financial damage, which turns into emotional damage, and some times physical damage, they inflict upon entire nations of people?
Do we know how many people exactly committed suicide when they lost their homes because the banks were siezung assets as fast as they could to cover the outright fraud that they committed?
I don't think so because the gov. was complicit, so they are not going to do the tabulation.
We do know that thousands of Indian cotton farmers were forced to off themselves thanks to the fraud of Monsanto selling GMO seed that they claimed would give them higher yields but destroyed their businesses with higher herbicide costs and the death of the animals who normally could eat the plants if they were not GMO, plus the skin ailments from just touching the plants.
Couldn't we try the executives of Monsanto for murder when they knew ahead of time that this would happen but didn't care as long as they got their bonuses, same with the wall-street bankers?

The Puritan founders of the US executed repeat offenders of petty theft, and even for "unnatural" relations with farm animals.
edit on 6-4-2014 by jmdewey60 because: (no reason given)




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