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2 year old shoots 11 year old

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posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:12 PM
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freedomSlave
reply to post by benrl
 


No we in this conversation when it is effecting us directly just keep your mouth shut and deal with it is your mentality? pffffffff
Pathetic



Nope, simply that you don't have the same laws.

I can not effect change in Canada, I feel thats canadians job to do.

I am arguing that simple enforcement would solve canada's problem by a happy accident.

By enforcing existing laws HERE, would solve some of the issues in general.

Where as more laws would not, and as a side note, none of the effect on Canada should dictate any of the laws, only the enforcement of here in the states.




posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:17 PM
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Well at least the gun was pointed the right way and he didn't blow his little head off....



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 


Seriously? SERIOUSLY!?!?!

This smells of absolute, 100% stinky pile of horse S#!T.

There is no way a 2-year old has the muscle capacity to LIFT and adequately POINT a 357 Magnum, let along pull the trigger. When my son turned four someone bought him a Nerf dart gun. He could barely lift, aim, and squeeze the trigger and it's made of plastic!! (And he's always been big for his age, even when he was four.)

Bad parenting? YES.
2-Year old did the shooting? You've got to be f@^king kidding me!?!?

It was one of the older kids, hands down.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:30 PM
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Feltrick
reply to post by SaturnFX
 


The main problem with the license idea, no matter the expense, is that the Constitution states that the right to bear arms shall NOT be infringed. Driving and fishing do require licenses but neither are a guaranteed right under the Constitution.

Arms meaning weapons
A person can own a variety of weapons, guns, swords, knives, bows, cannons, etc.
A person has the right to bear...sure

Why can't a 8 year old buy a handgun? Because..screw that, they aren't old enough to know better...not an adult, but then again, the constitution doesn't demand a person be an adult...a case can be made of how age restrictions are unconstitutional..but not even the most crazed gun nut is making that argument..because it simply makes sense..and ultimately, after we are done spewing nonsense and arguments...we are sensible people and will adhere to sensible addendums to our rights.

Is it constitutional then to require handgun owners to train? Perhaps not specifically, but its a good idea and ultimately doesn't infringe on your right to bear arms (after all, there are a lot more weapons out there than just a handgun...get a crossbow, or a rifle)


Right to pursue happiness...but in the US, most states demand you to be 21 before buying a beer...why? whats it to them? isn't this a clear-cut violation of ones persuit?
We add a lot of contingencies on the constitution as we grow as a society. Most are good, some are stupid. But the republic is a ever growing and changing thing. If we guide sensibly for the people, we become a better nation as a whole.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:32 PM
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WCmutant
reply to post by Feltrick
 


Seriously? SERIOUSLY!?!?!

This smells of absolute, 100% stinky pile of horse S#!T.

There is no way a 2-year old has the muscle capacity to LIFT and adequately POINT a 357 Magnum, let along pull the trigger. When my son turned four someone bought him a Nerf dart gun. He could barely lift, aim, and squeeze the trigger and it's made of plastic!! (And he's always been big for his age, even when he was four.)

Bad parenting? YES.
2-Year old did the shooting? You've got to be f@^king kidding me!?!?

It was one of the older kids, hands down.


Interesting.

Who is the true murderer?



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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WCmutant
reply to post by Feltrick
 


Seriously? SERIOUSLY!?!?!

This smells of absolute, 100% stinky pile of horse S#!T.

There is no way a 2-year old has the muscle capacity to LIFT and adequately POINT a 357 Magnum, let along pull the trigger.




posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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I think the post here: www.abovetopsecret.com...

Explains a lot about the current state of gun ownership in America. Anyone that needs to go online to ask people what kind of ammunition his shotgun uses is setting themselves up for failure! I also look at it as a failure on the gun shop who should have done a better job of preparing this owner to own a weapon.

The last time I was at a gun shop, perhaps a week ago, there were about a dozen folks looking to buy and only 2 clerks. Unfortunately, the clerks were not able to give these new owners the instruction they needed on their new, shiny purchases. To me, that is a problem.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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candlestick
Who is the true murderer?

Obamacare!!!




posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Seriously guys, has it not occurred to you that the responsibility for this does not lie with any single person or group.

The responsibility rests with the parents, who were crimminally negligent.
The responsibility rests with the legislators who do nothing to change a bad law.
The responsibility rests with the public who elect the legislators and demand access to weapons.
The responsibility rests with the media who portray gun ownership as conferring safety and power.
The responsibility rests with those involved with the manufacture, distribution and sale of guns.
The responsibility rests with those who lobby to prevent legislation that would curtail gun ownership.

The whole kit and caboodle are responsible and should be held accountable.

They should be shunned by society, have economic restrictions placed upon them, should be monitored and restricted from being able to be in a position that may cause injury or death through their actions or inactions (yeah, even up to loosing their jobs).

Then attitudes might change and "accidents" like these, be prevented.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:16 PM
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Feltrick

minkmouse
Guns are the answer to the world we have created. If personal possession and desire for more exist then we will need some deterrent!
edit on 5-4-2014 by minkmouse because: missing an N


Hold on a second! Are you seriously trying to say that if the 11 yr old had a gun then the 2 yr old wouldn't have shot her? How would more guns have stopped this? Please explain your post...


Don't quite understands how you got your question from my post but I guess it went through certain filters you have before you. The need for guns can only exist if there is a perceived threat that there are those who would try to take from us what is rightfully ours. You have more than I, I can't abide with this idea and need a weapon to ensure that the reverse is true. If we were not so geared toward greed and personal possession, we would not need guns as a response to a perceived threat. If my goal in life was to promote your well being before my own, I doubt I'd need a gun! Guns only serve selfish value systems.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:34 PM
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This is a tragedy that I (with a few of the others here) do feel the parents should be held criminally responsible for. The parents in these cases always walk and I don't feel like they should. I am also with a few of the others that wonder if this is really how it went down. Was the gun already cocked and left laying? It seems like it would be awfully hard for a two year old to cock a gun without shooting themselves in the leg first. Maybe they were just that adept. I don't know.

Training is a good idea I think. I also think that since guns have become "bad" a lot of people have started hiding them away from the children. They don't talk about them. It's a dirty little secret in a way. They don't show them the guns and tell them how dangerous they are. They hide them and never talk about it. When I was younger we had guns in the house. All of my friends had guns in their houses. Nobody ever handled those guns. Nobody ever played with those guns. The parents didn't keep them locked away either. Most all of us were taught from an early age how to handle firearms safely so we knew and we weren't curious enough to "find out" if Russian Roulette was fun or not. We had a healthy respect for what we knew they could do.

I do think that is why a lot of teenagers these days wind up dying in accidental shootings. The curiosity is too much so when they are old enough to find the guns and play with them after mommy and daddy leave... tragedy happens.

We used to have loaded shotguns in gun racks in the back of our trucks in high school. It was never an issue. Maybe it is where we all grew up in the country? It's just how things always were. You never had to worry someone would accidentally shoot you or someone else, but you never had to worry about them bringing one into school back then either. Go figure.

Now of course a two year old wouldn't completely understand explanations and death, but most of the accidents do happen with children that are old enough to understand.... they are mostly never taught. The gun has been in the bottom of dad's closet for 15 years with no explanation to the child. The first chance they get to look at it... well, they are children and if not taught what do you expect?

Teaching all around would cut down on a lot of this. And some of the parents that see other parents held liable for being this negligent might think twice before leaving a loaded gun laying where a 2 year old can reach it.
edit on 4/5/2014 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:48 PM
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WCmutant
reply to post by Feltrick
 


Seriously? SERIOUSLY!?!?!

This smells of absolute, 100% stinky pile of horse S#!T.

There is no way a 2-year old has the muscle capacity to LIFT and adequately POINT a 357 Magnum, let along pull the trigger. When my son turned four someone bought him a Nerf dart gun. He could barely lift, aim, and squeeze the trigger and it's made of plastic!! (And he's always been big for his age, even when he was four.)

Bad parenting? YES.
2-Year old did the shooting? You've got to be f@^king kidding me!?!?

It was one of the older kids, hands down.


Bingo! You nailed it.
I'd bet what I have in my bank account that a two-year-old could not cock the gun and pull the trigger on a 357 magnum. I'm a grown woman and I struggle with a gun of that size.
I'm calling bravo sierra on the story as reported.



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 12:53 AM
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chr0naut
reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Seriously guys, has it not occurred to you that the responsibility for this does not lie with any single person or group.

The responsibility rests with the parents, who were crimminally negligent.
The responsibility rests with the legislators who do nothing to change a bad law.
The responsibility rests with the public who elect the legislators and demand access to weapons.
The responsibility rests with the media who portray gun ownership as conferring safety and power.
The responsibility rests with those involved with the manufacture, distribution and sale of guns.
The responsibility rests with those who lobby to prevent legislation that would curtail gun ownership.

The whole kit and caboodle are responsible and should be held accountable.

They should be shunned by society, have economic restrictions placed upon them, should be monitored and restricted from being able to be in a position that may cause injury or death through their actions or inactions (yeah, even up to loosing their jobs).

Then attitudes might change and "accidents" like these, be prevented.



I agree.

This is what we get when we take riflery out of the schools. The weapon was planted by a mysterious male friend, or put on top the fridge by the girl, or the mom. But either way, it shows a serious absence in the traditions of both the transfer of arms and the obligations between a guest and host. If we must blame one person it is probably the "male friend", but I go with the list above. This incidence it proof positive of the failure of firearm education. Why is Coke-a-cola in schools, but Winchester isn't.

I'm tired of living in a world where if someone points an empty shotgun at me, and I correct them "always treat every firearm as though it is loaded" they get mad and act like i'm the ass hole. For even being stern about it. Listen people. There are a lot of curious smart children out there. And if they sense that society is never going to even let them touch all the neat stuff video shows them, they are going to try and create it for themselves.

Americans are just waking up to the magnitude of lost culture ever since the department of education was established, and the boxing, firearm culture systematically deconstructed from the schools. People didn't used to fight in the halls. They could take-it-to-the-ring. Where one might even get the glory of a win as well. In front of everyone. I bet most these days have actually seen, in their own schooling, an actual fight break out INSIDE. (one guy told he "even in the bathroom")


1.. Someone plants a fire arm.
2.. An 11 year old is shot.
3.. c a l l _ t h e _ n e w s ?
4.. ?

I mean how did this story even get out. Remember the kindergartener with the piece in his little back pack. Made national news for a day. Turned out the dad, sorta... pro gun control activist. Seriously. What is step 3. Did they get medical treatment first, or is the source a nurse. Who planted the pistol. Who called the news. Was it the male friend?


Mike Grouchy
edit on 6-4-2014 by mikegrouchy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 04:27 AM
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candlestick
People who said this “accident” is horrible are overestimated the personal responsibility of most people.
It's not a news for small kids get harm from boiling water.

My kids are 13,14 & 17 and I still make sure the kettle is at the back of the work surface and the cable is tucked away and that pots and pans are on the cooker with the handles turned to the side and not overhanging the cooker front. Geeze, even at work I find myself automatically pushing the kettle to the back of the counter top when everyone else leaves it sitting in the middle/to the front, and I don't even drink tea or coffee, I just see the potential danger. I find it hard to see why other people can't see the dangers, especially when they have kids.



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 06:31 AM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


Excellent point and I agree that a license is not necessarily an infringement of our 2nd Amendment right. In fact, I think the NRA failed in not pushing this. They could have become even more powerful by pushing legislation, requiring new purchasers to go thru an NRA course. The course would be offered for free but you could always sign up for a membership...

But, I don't think anyone would really agree with this. Let's look at voting. A State could pass legislation requiring proof of residency before someone is allowed to vote. Is this legal and Constitutional? I think so, but the courts disagree saying it is disenfranchising voters because it is requiring them to get an ID and we can't have that! So, what's the difference between requiring a photo ID to vote and requiring a license to purchase a firearm?



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 06:36 AM
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reply to post by minkmouse
 


My apologies, I misread your post.



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 07:01 AM
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CthulhuMythos

candlestick
People who said this “accident” is horrible are overestimated the personal responsibility of most people.
It's not a news for small kids get harm from boiling water.

My kids are 13,14 & 17 and I still make sure the kettle is at the back of the work surface and the cable is tucked away and that pots and pans are on the cooker with the handles turned to the side and not overhanging the cooker front. Geeze, even at work I find myself automatically pushing the kettle to the back of the counter top when everyone else leaves it sitting in the middle/to the front, and I don't even drink tea or coffee, I just see the potential danger. I find it hard to see why other people can't see the dangers, especially when they have kids.


People always have a mistake ,which is underestimate individual differences.


The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by Feltrick
 


So the gun was cocked?! Thats the most ignorant thing ive ever heard.

A toddler shot and killed themself in the mall parking lot of my hometown a few years ago. The parents put him/her in the car which had a gun in the console.

That was inexcusable, but this is beyond that even.



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 10:57 AM
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If you choose to have a gun in your home then keep it in a gun safe. There should be an IQ test before you buy a gun. It sickens me every time I hear about a child shooting another child. Things like thisd wouldn't happen if idiots would do what they supposed to do. Keep that # locked up!! DAMN!



posted on Apr, 6 2014 @ 01:01 PM
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I agree with members who've said this is not a gun control issue, it's a responsibility issue. This is not about rights under the US Constitution or any other constitution and frankly we don't even need to go in that direction. That gun was a man's possession and so his right to bear arms is just not the point here. This tragedy happened because he visited his lady friend and took his gun with him, but then he and the mother of those children allowed it wind up in their hands. In my mind, both adults bear some of the blame.

Some people just do not handle their guns in responsible way.

The video report (on the page linked by the OP) says that "charges are pending". I've mentioned this because a member or two has stated that in these cases, the parents always walk. Maybe they often do (which appalls me if it's true) but in this case, it's still being reviewed and there may be charges.

Re the query of the 2-y-o being able to fire that gun. Good point and I was wondering about that too. I don't know what make and model of 357 magnum that gun was and there's many on the market. The only extra bit of info I could glean from the video report was that it had an 8-inch barrel and I know that S&W has a 686 model that would fit the description. But whatever gun it was, the report doesn't say who cocked it, only that it was cocked when the 2-y-o pointed it at his sister and it "went off". I have to agree with members who've made the point that guns (in good condition) don't just "go off" by themselves. Someone has to squeeze the trigger.

But here's where I'm a little suspicious the 2-y-o kid fired that gun. Having fired a S&W 357 magnum long-barrel revolver I can say that those things have a lot of recoil. Even if that toddler managed to fire it, I'm amazed (but thankful) he wasn't hit by the gun as it kicked or got a broken wrist.

Also, a 357 magnum is loud and in an enclosed space it might cause hearing damage. I hope that those three surviving kids all get their hearing checked. I know that seems like a minor issue compared to this tragic, needless death of an 11-year-old, but it's still important.


edit on 6/4/14 by JustMike because: typos




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