It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ebola Epidemic Could Become Global Crisis

page: 11
60
<< 8  9  10    12  13  14 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 06:15 PM
link   
Good news! I don't have a link because I am on my mobile phone but the suspected cases in Ghana, Mali and Senegal are all negative for EVD and other similar diseases! So there's that much.

I think we can expect "suspected cases" to pop up because now the countries involved are on hyper alert.




posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 08:44 AM
link   
reply to post by Sundowner
 


Yes, it's really quite lovely and reassuring that some of the tests are coming back negative for Ebola - kinda reminds me of the press releases from Nigeria's Information Officer. Whatever's going on with this epidemic - and recognizing that most of the evidence will die in the jungle - I remain greatly offended by the 'damage control' and manipulation strategies. No wonder democracy's failing.


Dear Maggie Fox,

Oh Maggie. I respect you, don't get me wrong. But you buggered this one royally by saying, "WHO has sent more than 50 people… (and) …non-profit groups such as Medecins sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) are helping, also."

Pardon?! Excuse me!?! Are you effing kidding!?!!!

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) was in Guinea busting their butts long before the World Health Organization even bothered to sniff and say, "This outbreak is not big enough to notice." You know, back when MSF was begging for help, saying the geographic spread was making the Ebola impossible to contain. Back on March 23 when MSF declared an epidemic and bumped up their Emergency Response team from the 24 people already there - but the WHO kept blowing them off saying, "Problem? What problem?" Back then. Remember? .....



MY QUESTIONS to the World Health Organization:

Given that WHO policies determine other infectious diseases of poverty to be far more important than the occasional Ebola outbreak:

* Are you just assuming that this Ebola strain has not mutated significantly, or do you know for certain?

* Why and how did the Zaire Ebola strain travel thousands of kilometres to Guinea?

* Obviously, this Zaire Ebola strain is/has changed - can you please characterize those changes without lying through your teeth?

* Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) really pushed you hard on this one - is that because they have the luxury of not needing to take a global view or because they know something you do not?



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 11:00 AM
link   

soficrow

Given that WHO policies determine other infectious diseases of poverty to be far more important than the occasional Ebola outbreak

To be fair with only limited resources they do need to prioritize. And although Ebola a gruesome little bastard its just not something that going to kill hundreds of thousands or millions a year like HIV or Malaria. OR a possible game changer like bird flu or SARS.

If Ebola becomes airborne then they may prioritize it.


soficrow
* Are you just assuming that this Ebola strain has not mutated significantly, or do you know for certain?

If they have received samples in the USA then they would of been able to detect by now any significant mutations. Or at least have some idea somethings different.



soficrow
* Why and how did the Zaire Ebola strain travel thousands of kilometres to Guinea?

Thought we had covered that.

Its likely not traveled at all and has been there a while. Its been shown a strain been found in the Ivory coast and as bats at least carry Ebola Zaire and there range is in that area then it stands to reason it may have always been in the area but due to its rare nature just want stumbled on by some unlucky sod till now.



soficrow
* Obviously, this Zaire Ebola strain is/has changed - can you please characterize those changes without lying through your teeth?

Not sure what changes your talking about? Its not airborne.



To me the only question is why it sprung up in multiple places at once.









edit on 9-4-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-4-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 12:47 PM
link   


To me the only question is why it sprung up in multiple places at once.


Like I said earlier: I think it very well may be spread out (multiple places at once) because it took Guinea's government six weeks to even identify it...hence the spread.

Also, I stumbled across an article that was saying that scientists may be able to "predict" outbreaks as it were because they seem (the outbreaks) to coincide after/with dry spells/droughts that are followed by heavy rains.

Oh and sorry if I didn't quote you right, I am on my phone and may have messed it up!



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 01:50 PM
link   

Sundowner

Like I said earlier: I think it very well may be spread out (multiple places at once) because it took Guinea's government six weeks to even identify it...hence the spread.



Thats what im going with or contaminated bush meet that was transported and sold in different places.

Though its far from proven yet.
edit on 9-4-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 02:08 PM
link   

edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: messed up



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 02:10 PM
link   
reply to post by crazyewok
 


RE: Given that WHO policies determine other infectious diseases of poverty to be far more important than the occasional Ebola outbreak


To be fair with only limited resources they do need to prioritize. And although Ebola a gruesome little bastard its just not something that going to kill hundreds of thousands or millions a year like HIV or Malaria. OR a possible game changer like bird flu or SARS.

If Ebola becomes airborne then they may prioritize it.


I agree. It's a difficult situation and compared to other crises this Ebola outbreak-epidemic really doesn't measure up as a priority. Sad as that may be. And particular given that the big "World Health Day" celebration on Monday was used to launch a 'war' on vector borne diseases as the big WHO priority.




If they have received samples in the USA then they would of been able to detect by now any significant mutations. Or at least have some idea somethings different.


One would think. But do you really think "they" would they share that info with the general public?


RE:
* Why and how did the Zaire Ebola strain travel thousands of kilometres to Guinea?


Thought we had covered that.

Its likely not traveled at all and has been there a while. Its been shown a strain been found in the Ivory coast and as bats at least carry Ebola Zaire and there range is in that area then it stands to reason it may have always been in the area but due to its rare nature just want stumbled on by some unlucky sod till now.


I don't think that question has been properly addressed - or answered. Given that fruit bats are common fare in Guinea, it's highly unlikely that "Ebola was there all along" - and only just got noticed. ...The current economic activity aka resource extraction in Liberia might account for one or two of the current Ebola outbreaks but doesn't explain what's happening in Guinea.

NOTE: The Ivory Coast Ebola strain (CIEBOV) is NOT the Zaire strain (ZEBOV).

Liberia: One of the last strongholds for Western chimpanzees


RE: Obviously, this Zaire Ebola strain is/has changed


Not sure what changes your talking about? Its not airborne.


No - I'm not trying to imply it's airborne - just sayin' it popped up thousands of miles from where it's been, with no clear or proper explanation as to why.



To me the only question is why it sprung up in multiple places at once.


To me the question is similar but a bit bigger - Why did it jump thousands of miles, and spring up in multiple places at the same time? I suspect the explanation has to do with either a) unknown/unrecognized soil or insect reservoirs; or b) disruption/destruction of (ebola infected) fruit bat habitats elsewhere and their migrations to the areas.

In fact, a lot of political, social, cultural and economic agendas are clouding the issues here. I'm just looking for open enquiry.




[UN chief urges to prioritize combat of vector-borne diseases

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki- moon on Monday called on the international community to give priority to controlling the spread of vector-borne diseases.

Ban delivered the message in marking the World Health Day, which fell on Monday and is observed annually in commemorating founding of the UN World Health Organization (WHO) in 1948.

"Every year, more than 1 million people die from diseases carried by mosquitoes, flies and other insects, such as triatomine bugs. These vector-borne diseases -- which include malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis -- cause chronic illness and immense suffering for hundreds of millions more," said Ban, who said more people are exposed to the vectors that transmit these diseases because of climate change, altered habitats and increased international trade and travel.












edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)

edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 02:22 PM
link   

soficrow

I don't think that question has been properly addressed - or answered. Given that fruit bats are common fare in Guinea, it's highly unlikely that "Ebola was there all along" - and only just got noticed. ...The current economic activity aka resource extraction in Liberia might account for one or two of the current Ebola outbreaks but doesn't explain what's happening in Guinea.

I get what your saying but Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus shows it can be found in that area but there rarely any outbreaks in that area. So it shows just because Ebola is in a area doesn't mean it will quickly start a outbreak. Like the Côte d'Ivoire strain just because Zaire is there doesnt mean its easly stumbled across.



soficrow


No - I'm not trying to imply it's airborne - just sayin' it popped up thousands of miles from where it's been, with no clear or proper explanation as to why.

AHH! Now we are talking! I have had this thought too!

Yes maybe its not Zaire but a very very similar new strain. I know Reston tested positive to the same tests as the Zaire strain.




soficrow
To me the question is similar but a bit bigger - Why did it jump thousands of miles,


I just don't agree with the jumping part. If a strain can be found as far as the Philippines I dont see anything unusual about a strain being found in Africa only a few hundred miles from the Côte d'Ivoire were another strain was found.

Its a new virus on human terms so there not a lot we know about including its range. In fact for a very old virus its odd we haven't encountered it sooner. And maybe we have? Especially if we have DNA markers for it.



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 02:25 PM
link   
The WHO is backtracking. Now says, "The Ebola outbreak in West Africa among the most challenging ever."

And officials are reaching. Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), says "Ebola's appearance in West Africa should not come as a surprise" because it's spread by bats and bats are in these areas so it's not that unusual to see outbreaks in areas adjacent to each other. But. Duh. The only area in South Africa with a previous Ebola outbreak was Cote d'Ivoire - and the strain was CIEBOV - not the Zaire strain (ZEBOV).

HOWEVER. The WHO now says, "Men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus to sex partners for up to seven weeks after they recover." ...Now this may explain everything - the thousand miles jump AND the multiple centers. And destroy the sex trade. And really mess up the damage control. Not to mention the new priorities plan. Gawdforbid Ebola turns out to be vector-borne too.


Health Care Workers Struggle to Contain Guinea Ebola

The World Health Organization (WHO) calls the Ebola outbreak in West Africa among the most challenging ever. The organization reports the virus has killed 101 people in Guinea and 10 in Liberia.

...But Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the infectious diseases division at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), says Ebola's appearance in West Africa should not come as a surprise.

“It’s a disease that’s spread by direct contact with an infected person, but it’s also spread by exposure to an infected animal like a bat," Fauci said. "And since we know those animals are in those areas of those adjacent countries, it’s not that unusual to see outbreaks in areas of southern Africa that are adjacent to each other."

....The WHO reports that men who have recovered from the disease can still transmit the virus to sex partners for up to seven weeks after they recover.




posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 02:38 PM
link   
reply to post by crazyewok
 


I just don't agree with the jumping part. If a strain can be found as far as the Philippines I dont see anything unusual about a strain being found in Africa only a few hundred miles from the Côte d'Ivoire were another strain was found.

Its a new virus on human terms so there not a lot we know about including its range. In fact for a very old virus its odd we haven't encountered it sooner. And maybe we have? Especially if we have DNA markers for it.


Different influenza strains are found all over the world, and they all are well, ...different. Knowing which specific strain might be endemic in which particular geographic region is essential to disease control.

You're right - we don't know much about Ebola, including its range. But it looks like we're about to find out a lot more.

....Maybe we haven't encountered this very old virus before because it was hiding in areas we have recently disrupted to get at resources.

....Maybe the sexual transmission is much more important than previously recognized.


ALSO NOTE: HomoSkepticus pointed out humans do NOT harbor Ebola DNA in our genes, just bornovirus genes. Check it out here.



Ed. to add:

maybe its not Zaire but a very very similar new strain. I know Reston tested positive to the same tests as the Zaire strain.


Would that be a nightmare scenario? ...How many hemorrhagic fevers are there in the world? ...and we still have the question, "Why now?"

















edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)

edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: wd



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 03:37 PM
link   
www.nytimes.com...

You might find this old (1996) New York Times article on Ebola virus interesting.

This 'possible' case was certainly NOT in Africa, so what might that indicate about vectors?



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 03:46 PM
link   
reply to post by Elliot
 


Interesting article.
...Never mind vectors, what about those reservoirs?



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 05:47 PM
link   

soficrow


Different influenza strains are found all over the world, and they all are well, ...different. Knowing which specific strain might be endemic in which particular geographic region is essential to disease control.

Your preaching to the choir.


soficrow

....Maybe we haven't encountered this very old virus before because it was hiding in areas we have recently disrupted to get at resources.

That may very well be the reason why it may have been circulating in the area for decades or even centuries but never hit the public in any meaningful way.

As I said before Ebola may very well have hit the area in past but in such small numbers it got passed off as Lassa or Yellow fever. Or worse when the civil wars were going on community out in rebel controlled lands cut of may have had outbreaks and it just never got noticed, especial if roads and transport was restricted.

In Liberia or Sierra Leone when the civil wars was going on and mines were seized by rebels and enslaved who would know what happened out there?

Its only now the civil wars in the area have stopped and reconstruction has started cut off areas are coming back into the world community, new areas are being cleared and built on and more importunately transports becoming easier.



soficrow

ALSO NOTE: HomoSkepticus pointed out humans do NOT harbor Ebola DNA in our genes, just bornovirus genes. Check it out here.

Thought something was odd there as ATS was the first time I heard that.





soficrow
Would that be a nightmare scenario?

If its clinically the same a Ebola Zaire and not Airborne then its no worse or better than if it had just been Ebola Zaire in the area.



soficrow
...How many hemorrhagic fevers are there in the world? ...and we still have the question, "Why now?"

Awnser is lots!

Lassa fever
Lujo virus
Argentine hemorrhagic fever
Bolivian hemorrhagic fever
Brazilian hemorrhagic fever
Venezuelan hemorrhagic fever
Hantavirus
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever
Ebola
Marburg
Omsk hemorrhagic fever
Kyasanur Forest disease
Dengue Fever
Yellow Fever

And theirs a few new ones without names yest.

The south American ones, HantaVirus and Crimean Congo are pretty dam nasty. Lassa will ruin your day too.



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 06:23 PM
link   
reply to post by crazyewok
 


When I started this thread on March 30, there were 70 dead, MSF called epidemic and already had 60 health workers onsite, and the Ebola had spread from several rural centers to the capital city of Conarky - but the WHO kept saying no big deal. True, they're backtracking now. But. Just pulled some coverage from the 2012 Ebola outbreak in the Congo - with 31 dead, the WHO said the situation was very, very serious, and "If nothing is done now, the disease will reach other places, and even major towns will be threatened." ...So what's the difference then and now? Is it just new leadership and priorities? 'Cuz it's not the "situation."

COMPARE


Ebola out of control in Congo, WHO says

Thursday Sep 13, 2012 6:20 AM

By Reuters
An Ebola outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo risks spreading to major towns if not brought under control soon, the World Health Organization said on Thursday.

The death toll has more than doubled since last week to 31, including five health workers.

…."The epidemic is not under control. On the contrary the situation is very, very serious," Eugene Kabambi, a WHO spokesman in Congo's capital Kinshasa, told Reuters by telephone.

"If nothing is done now, the disease will reach other places, and even major towns will be threatened," he said.



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 06:31 PM
link   
reply to post by crazyewok
 


Shall I assume you're familiar with this one? As a choir member and fruit bat aficionado I mean. Does it bear any relevance in your opinion?


New virus in Africa looks like rabies, acts like Ebola

Thursday Sep 27, 2012 2:26 PM

A virus that killed two teenagers in Congo in 2009 is a completely new type, related to rabies but causing the bleeding and rapid death that makes Ebola infection so terrifying, scientists reported on Thursday. They’re searching for the source of the virus, which may be transmitted by insects or bats.

…..“Although the source of the virus remains unclear, study findings suggest that Bas-Congo virus may be spread by human-to-human contact and is an emerging pathogen associated with acute hemorrhagic fever in Africa,” the researchers wrote.

Africa is loaded with nasty viruses. Lassa fever virus comes from a family known as arenaviruses and causes 500,000 cases of hemorrhagic fever a year. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever and Rift Valley Fever viruses are in another family called bunyaviruses; Ebola and Marburg viruses are filoviruses that kill anywhere between 30 percent and 90 percent of victims. They’re also helping wipe out great apes such as gorillas in Central Africa. This adds a new one to the list.

It worries Chiu because its closest relative is spread by biting flies in Australia. “We think that is potentially a valuable clue. This virus may have come from an insect vector,” Chiu says. “What is scary about this virus is if it does happen to be spread by insects, it has the potential to be something like West Nile."

…..“It has probably been lurking out there in remote areas and causing sporadic cases of hemorrhagic fever and no one had the resources to discover it,” Chiu said. “This is probably the tip of the iceberg. I believe there are many, many more of these emerging viruses that have yet to be discovered,” he added.

“This points to the importance of being vigilant, especially these remote areas of Africa and Asia. This is the area that I believe the next generation of emerging viruses will come from.”

….Fair’s team and hundreds of other scientists have been looking for the reservoir -- the animal or insect source --of Ebola. That would be a bat or other creature that can carry it without getting sick itself. So far they have had no luck, although fruit bats are a major suspect.





edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 06:38 PM
link   
reply to post by soficrow
 


Ahhh they named it then :p

Its one of the new ones I refered too in my last post.

Yeah I heard of back in 2009 but didnt keep up to date unfortunatly.

Apart from abit of work on HIV most my works been on Bacteria related pathogens so I can be a bit behind.




edit on 9-4-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-4-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 06:45 PM
link   
reply to post by crazyewok
 


Again, re: 2012 Ebola outbreak in the Congo - with 31 dead, the WHO said the situation was very, very serious, and "If nothing is done now, the disease will reach other places, and even major towns will be threatened." ...So what's the difference then and now? Is it just new leadership and priorities? 'Cuz it's not the "situation."








edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: oops



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 06:58 PM
link   
Lassa patient in Minnesota as we speak. In the article it linked to this :
www.wired.com...
Very interesting tidbits in the article.


Right now we have Hanta around.. and do a lot. We have hem fevers everywhere.. all with different vectors and transmission variables. Interesting info on cholesterol and Hanta

www.eurekalert.org...
And t can become Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome.... its been misdiagnosed a lot over the yrs.
www.cdc.gov...

Just read

securitystudiesonline.wordpress.com...

More for your reading pleasure :
www.globalsecurity.org...

Dr. Ken Alibek, former the First Deputy Director of Biopreparat, speculated that the Russians had aerosolized the Ebola virus for dissemination as a biological weapon. The Japanese terrorist group Aum Shinrikyo reportedly sent members to Zaire during an outbreak to harvest the virus.


and
www.nytimes.com...


Want more interesting reading? I gotta million of em
I tried to talk about weaponized rabies and Ebola/Hem Fevers on here several years ago.. but no one cared.



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 07:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Advantage
 


Interesting stuff but we're not here to foment panic. Just keeping an eye on things. : ) ...But for the record, I personally think our petrie-dish planet earth does scarier things than any biolab can (especially given all the synthetic chemicals, contaminants and pollutants we've added to the mix).


Also btw - posted on the Lassa Fever case on April 4.








edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: wd



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 07:06 PM
link   

soficrow
reply to post by Advantage
 


Interesting stuff but we're not here to foment panic. Just keeping an eye on things. : ) ...But for the record, I personally think our petrie-dish planet earth does scarier things than any biolab can (especially given all the synthetic chemicals, contaminants and pollutants we've added to the mix).


Also btw - posted on the Lassa Fever case on April 4.








edit on 9/4/14 by soficrow because: wd


Panic.. the only people who would panic would be the ones who either didnt read the links or canrt understand whats in the links.



new topics

top topics



 
60
<< 8  9  10    12  13  14 >>

log in

join