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Ebola Epidemic Could Become Global Crisis

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posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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reply to post by ketsuko
 
reply to post by crazyewok
 



Socrates engaged in questioning of his students in an unending search for truth. He sought to get to the foundations of his students' and colleagues' views by asking continual questions until a contradiction was exposed, thus proving the fallacy of the initial assumption. This became known as the Socratic Method, and may be Socrates' most enduring contribution to philosophy.


Socratic Teaching

The oldest, and still the most powerful, teaching tactic for fostering critical thinking is Socratic teaching. In Socratic teaching we focus on giving students questions, not answers. We model an inquiring, probing mind by continually probing into the subject with questions. Fortunately, the abilities we gain by focusing on the elements of reasoning in a disciplined and self-assessing way, and the logical relationships that result from such disciplined thought, prepare us for Socratic questioning.


Socratic method - A teaching technique in which a teacher does not give information directly but instead asks a series of questions, with the result that the student comes either to the desired knowledge by answering the questions or to a deeper awareness of the limits of knowledge.
















edit on 7/4/14 by soficrow because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 11:04 AM
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Death toll at least 111; officials expect Ebola "outbreak" to last several more months.


Ebola Outbreak to Continue for Several More Months, WHO Says
By Makiko Kitamura April 08, 2014

An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa is expected to continue for several more months, the World Health Organization said.

“We fully expect to be engaged for the next two, three, four months,” Keiji Fukuda, assistant director-general for health security and environment, said during a press briefing in Geneva today.

The death toll has risen to 111 with at least 101 people dying from the bleeding disorder in Guinea and 10 people in neighboring Liberia, Stephane Hugonnet, a medical officer at the WHO’s department of global preparedness, surveillance and response, said at the briefing.


Officials say Ebola outbreak could last months



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 

Has Ebola ever surfaced for 'many months' before?

If Ebola is around for 'many months' that would indicate no control, wouldn't it?

If Ebola is out of control for 'many months' what is to stop it being 'around' for much longer?



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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not seeing a whole lot of containment

"Saudi Arabia says a man has died from a new respiratory virus related to SARS, bringing to 63 the number of deaths in the kingdom at the center of the outbreak. The health ministry said on Friday that the latest victim, a 19-year-old, died in the city of al-Kharj, southeast of Riyadh, according to a report from the Associated Press news agency. Two of his sisters are in hospital on suspicion they have been infected with the virus."


that Saudi to Gunni,,,ohhh ya different Virus,, u say potatoe ,,ur still dead.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


I wouldn't be surprised if it lasts a good 6 months or more, that's been the time usually a serious outbreak lasts. I member when they nearly lost control of that 2004 Marburg outbreak in Angola it lasted a long time.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Hi soficrow,

Thinking out loud here...I'm curious if termites or another type of insect is the cause of the "unprecedented "Ebola "outbreak" in Africa. That might explain multiple epicenters.

Here's an interesting quote by the 'The Journal of Infectious Diseases'...




Many potential blood-feeding arthropod vectors (phlebotomine flies, culicoids, ixodid ticks, mites, fleas, and wingless flies associated with bats) have not been tested by experimental inoculation. The susceptibility of insects used by humans or wild vertebrate reservoir hosts as a source of food (including termites, moths, and larvae [grubs]) also has not been explored.



Ecology of Marburg and Ebola Viruses: Speculations and Directions for Future Research
jid.oxfordjournals.org...

Though it's not my idea of a tasty snack, people eat termites and I think there are a lot of termites in Africa (I haven't had time to look into it much).

Love light and peace,

Toni
edit on AM4302014443am5230am by Antoniastar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Lets get started already! There are so many threats nowadays, one more wont change much. Ebola is more attractive than a slow death by radiations btw. But THIS would have the potential to reboot society not in a bad way. People are too ignorant of whats happening outside of their prefabricated little world. A good reality check would set things right again, even if it costs billions.. But not many must share my view of things.. Haha

Anyway unless the death toll reach a thousand in a week, i see this as another scare operation. Dont forget the past h5n1 outbreak..
edit on 8-4-2014 by _damon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 11:45 AM
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Elliot

Has Ebola ever surfaced for 'many months' before?



You have the 1998–2000 marburg outbreak in the Congo

You have the 2004/2005 Outbreak of Marburg in Angola

As for Ebola
2002-2003 Congo outbreak
2001–2002 Gabon
2000-2001 Uganda

Those lasted a 6 odd months

And there been a half dozen others too that have lasted a few odd months.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Drought and termites in Guinea could be related to the latest Ebola outbreak. Maybe not.

21 March 2014: World - Drought and Access to Water

ercportal.jrc.ec.europa.eu...




As part of a broad programme to record the influence of severe drought on selected target populations, two taxa of termite were monitored over a 24-month period in the southern Kruger National Park, South Africa. Activity of harvester termites Hodotermes mossambicus reached highest levels during the drought, while macrotermitine Allodontermes rhodesiensis and Microtermes sp appear to favour less extreme levels of rainfall. The general impact of termites in the KNP is discussed and related to studies elsewhere in Africa.


www.koedoe.co.za...

Is Nature on her period?

And who eats a "plate of termites"? Gross.

edit on PM4302014430pm5630pm by Antoniastar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by Antoniastar
 


Great speculation and wonderful linked article. S&
I kinda like the one about the dormant and active life cycle, or maybe the virus needs to live an arthropod before it can go into its chrysalis stage. Whatever is going on, it's clearly complicated - that excellent article was published in 1999 and the key questions have not been answered. More.....


...An interesting possibility is that filoviruses may be arthropod or plant viruses, with non—blood-feeding arthropods transmitting the virus to intermediate hosts or humans during oral ingestion or envenomation. Paradoxically, in Africa, Ebola virus disease has high lethality and high seroprevalence as determined by the IFA test. If the seroreactivity is confirmed by more specific tests, then the Ebola virus serogroup in Africa probably contains an antigenically cross-reactive, enzootic, nonpathogenic agent(s). Such viruses may have separate life cycles or may give rise to virulent strains by mutation.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by _damon
 


...i see this as another scare operation. Dont forget the past h5n1 outbreak..


H5N1 practically destroyed several nations' poultry industries, bankrupted small farmers from India to Cambodia to Indonesia, became endemic in Indonesia and a few other countries - and still kills people.

Just because YOU are not aware how this disease might have touched your life, it still had a HUGE effect on others' lives. Whether or not you choose to respect that.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 02:39 PM
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reply to post by Antoniastar
 


Don't know if it's the drought-termite link but there DOES seem to be a 'periodicity.' Guess the key is finding out what that's all about - does the Ebola virus have a life cycle? Flu viruses spread best in dry weather and humidity is the main factor affecting infectivity - maybe Ebola needs dry conditions too for infecting humans?




posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 02:45 PM
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reply to post by crazyewok
 


THanks ce. S&
...any easy way you can correlate past outbreaks' initiation and cessation with extreme weather?

...Toni's looking at termites as being either a/the reservoir, or as playing a role in Ebola's periodicity in a way related to drought.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 02:48 PM
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reply to post by Elliot
 


The lack of knowledge about this virus is a strong no-control indicator. In my opinion. Definitely check out Toni's link Ecology of Marburg and Ebola Viruses: Speculations and Directions for Future Research. Especially scary since it's already almost 15 years later and none of the questions have been answered.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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And who eats a "plate of termites"? Gross.


Termites are considered good eating, particularly the winged ones in a lot of places. Actually, the U.S. is the odd ball in that we don't eat insect/arthropod protein. There are far more places where they do than don't. Various "bugs" are very readily available, prolific and highly nutritious and most importantly - cheap.



Strange as it sounds, after watching I don't know how many episodes of Bizarre Foods, what she's cooking up actually looks like something I'd try now and doesn't seem all that alien to me.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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soficrow
reply to post by crazyewok
 


THanks ce. S&
...any easy way you can correlate past outbreaks' initiation and cessation with extreme weather?

...Toni's looking at termites as being either a/the reservoir, or as playing a role in Ebola's periodicity in a way related to drought.





The thing is that they really like the winged termites and those usually don't put in an appearance until summer rains ... unless things are different in West Africa or the usual cycle has been messed up somehow.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 03:45 PM
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soficrow
reply to post by crazyewok
 


THanks ce. S&
...any easy way you can correlate past outbreaks' initiation and cessation with extreme weather?

...Toni's looking at termites as being either a/the reservoir, or as playing a role in Ebola's periodicity in a way related to drought.




If I get time I could have a look at some point.

The outbreaks I have looked at on the surface begin around October-December and end around April/June. So may be something worth looking at.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 04:26 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


I purposedly discarded these points because from my perspective, its minimal, minor, insignificant. I was only focusing on the effects on health and the death toll. And the scare was disproportionate and resulted in the destruction and slaughter of countless animals "just to be safe". The whole thing was a masquerade and who made profit out of it again? Big pharma. But screw the farmers and their god damn business, their own fault for not staying updated or being at the wrong place at the wrong time, why would i care if they make less money or even lost their homes? As if thats what was important here.

Im sure it kills people. Still way less than the common flu or even a cold. But the scare left its marks on you i see. You lost any common sense.
edit on 8-4-2014 by _damon because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by _damon
 


no ,,
what is important is that they stop eating

roasted, BAT or monkey

or bat/monkey/secret ingredient,,,,stew.

cause there hungry.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 05:26 PM
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Dear Maggie Fox,

Oh Maggie. I respect you, don't get me wrong. But you buggered this one royally by saying, "WHO has sent more than 50 people… (and) …non-profit groups such as Medecins sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) are helping, also."

Pardon?! Excuse me!?! Are you effing kidding!?!!!

Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) was in Guinea busting their butts long before the World Health Organization even bothered to sniff and say, "This outbreak is not big enough to notice." You know, back when MSF was begging for help, saying the geographic spread was making the Ebola impossible to contain. Back on March 23 when MSF declared an epidemic and bumped up their Emergency Response team from the 24 people already there - but the WHO kept blowing them off saying, "Problem? What problem?" Back then. Remember?

I'm really glad the WHO, CDC and other UN agencies decided to pitch in and help Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). I think they all should do that. I do know the UN has other priorities and not enough resources to go around, and infectious diseases of poverty are killing children way faster than Ebola is, and really, really have to be the UN's biggest priority and that's why they sent their regrets to Guinea's Ebola do. That's why MSF had to carry the ball alone and without help for such a long critical time.

But Maggie, do you really have to snub MSF now that the big boys decided to show? And ignore MSF's substantial contributions just to hype up the WHO and UN and CDC and all? Really?

With all due respect,
sofi crow


Brussels/Geneva, 22 March 2014 – An outbreak of Ebola haemorrhagic fever in southern Guinea has prompted the international medical organisation Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to launch an emergency response. Twenty-four MSF doctors, nurses, logisticians and hygiene and sanitation experts are already in the country, while additional staff will strengthen the team in the coming days.

MSF has set up an isolation unit for suspected cases in Guéckédou, in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, and is currently doing the same in the town of Macenta, also in the Nzérékoré region in the south of the country. "Isolation units are essential to prevent the spread of the disease, which is highly contagious," says Dr Esther Sterk, MSF tropical medicine advisor. "Specialised staff are providing care to patients showing signs of infection."

With the help of the local community, MSF’s emergency team is also focusing on actively searching for people who may have been infected through contact with already identified Ebola patients.

33 tons of supplies sent

MSF is currently sending some 33 tons of supplies to Guinea on two charter planes leaving from Belgium and France, containing medicines, medical equipment and the supplies necessary for isolating patients, putting sanitation measures in place and protecting its teams.


March 23, 2014, Guinea: Ebola epidemic declared, MSF launches emergency response


March 25, 2014

In response to the Ebola epidemic that has broken out in Guinea, Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) continues to reinforce its teams in Guéckédou and Macenta, two towns in the south of the country where the virus has spread. Thirty [MSF] staff members are already on the ground and more doctors, nurses, and sanitation specialists will be joining them in the coming days.


WHO Battling 'Most Challenging' Ebola Outbreak

First published April 8th 2014, 3:49 pm
BY MAGGIE FOX


An outbreak of Ebola virus that straddles the border between at least two west African countries has World Health Organization officials running — and worried.

At least 157 people have been infected or are suspected to be infected in Guinea and Liberia, and 101 of them have died, WHO officials said Tuesday. They are chasing down suspected cases in three more countries and trying to track 600 people at risk of becoming infected.

This is one of the most challenging Ebola outbreaks that we have ever faced,” said Dr. Keiji Fukuda, assistant director-general for health security at WHO.

….WHO has sent more than 50 people to the affected countries to help distribute equipment, to find and treat patients and to help educate the public about the right things to do. They include a team from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Other United Nations agencies and non-profit groups such as Medecins sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) are helping, also.





edit on 8/4/14 by soficrow because: tnkr



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