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Neurosurgeons Successfully Implant 3D Printed Skull

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posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 01:43 AM
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A 22 year old woman, who suffers from a chronic bone disorder, had the first successful 3D printed cranial implant that has not been rejected by the patient. The disorder she suffers from increased the thickness of her skull to 5cm. The surgery took 23 hours and was preformed by Neurosurgeons at The University Medical Center Urecht in the Netherlands. They removed the top portion of her skull and replaced it with the 3D implant. The patient is symptom free and has since been able to return to work.

3D printed skull implant:



The skull was made specifically for the patient using an unspecified durable plastic. Since the operation, the patient has gained her sight back entirely, is symptom-free and back to work. It is not known whether the plastic will require replacing at a later date or if it will last a lifetime.

The lead surgeon had previous experience with 3D reconstructions of skulls, but such a large implant had never been accomplished before. "It is almost impossible to see that she's ever had surgery," said Dr Verweij in the university's official statement.

It is hoped this technique can also be used for patients with other bone disorders or to repair severely damaged skulls after an accident or tumour. The operation was carried out three months ago, but the hospital has only just released details of the surgery.

full article


If you want to learn more about UMC Utrecht's groundbreaking work, you can watch the university's video below; it's in Dutch, but the doctors walk you through the preparation stages and the actual operation itself. It's a fascinating look at 3-D printing's live-saving potential — just be ready to see some brain matter on display.
(Warning: graphic video)
source ..



The advances in the medical field never cease to amaze. Hopefully this woman is able to live a long and happy life.
edit on 30-3-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: Added video




posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 02:00 AM
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S&F

My mother has had 9 cranioplastys in the last 3 years due to unknown skull deterioration. She noticed that she had a small part of her skull becoming dented in about 15 years ago and it got bigger over that time. When she went in to have it fixed it was about the size of a baseball. They didn't know what it was until they went in. They removed a large part of her skull, sent it off for testing and found no results. The surgeon said that you could see right through the piece of skull they removed.

They put in a plate and sutured her up. A year later it began breaking down. The suture lines started opening back up and they had her come back in, take the plate out and suture her up without the plate. 4 months later after she healed, they went back in to replace the plate. Again, in just 4 months time the wound was not healing. It was opening back up. They go in again, remove it and send her home.

She goes back after she is healed and they try a plate of different material. Same thing. Each time they are having to cut away more skin and bone. After several more tries she is done with it. She chose not to have a plate put in at all. Now she is walking around missing about a softball size piece of her skull.

She rejected every plate they put in. She healed fine each time it was removed but her body just wouldn't take the plate.

Anyway... I know this is too much information but I am going to send this to her. I feel like she isn't the only person that has had issues with this. I hope this can be something new that might work for all of them. It isn't too safe to have folks walking around with nothing but skin covering their brain.

Thanks again for finding this.

edit on 3/30/2014 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 03:14 AM
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The thing that shocks me in this is that she is "back to work", like she was just a machine that has been repaired and is now back and ready for service. Some would say that for our masters, time = money. That makes me think of the coming singularity and many books and movies, for example the movie "Elysium".



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 03:19 AM
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Crazy stuff, what these neurosurgeons are doing these days. It's especially interesting how they don't know if the plastic will have to be replaced or not. Wouldn't you want to know how long this stuff was gonna last? What if pieces started breaking off while it was in her head?

Edit to add: I wonder what it feels like?

Off topic, but this book is a good read on a similar subject if you've never read it: The Terminal Man
edit on 30-3-2014 by thesearchfortruth because: link, edit to add



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by gosseyn
 



We're supposed to be grateful of being sent back to work asap. Isn't capitalism a wonderful thing?



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 04:18 AM
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gosseyn
The thing that shocks me in this is that she is "back to work", like she was just a machine that has been repaired and is now back and ready for service. Some would say that for our masters, time = money. That makes me think of the coming singularity and many books and movies, for example the movie "Elysium".

No, that's your bias showing. It means that is how well she recovered that she is able to work. Some people just look for problems.



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 06:17 AM
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OccamsRazor04

gosseyn
The thing that shocks me in this is that she is "back to work", like she was just a machine that has been repaired and is now back and ready for service. Some would say that for our masters, time = money. That makes me think of the coming singularity and many books and movies, for example the movie "Elysium".

No, that's your bias showing. It means that is how well she recovered that she is able to work. Some people just look for problems.


You say that because you don't have the big sociological picture in mind like I do. Instead of saying "she was able to enjoy life like nothing happened" or something like that, they chose to say that she was able to work again and that says a lot about current cultural and sociological trends.



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 06:56 AM
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gosseyn

OccamsRazor04

gosseyn
The thing that shocks me in this is that she is "back to work", like she was just a machine that has been repaired and is now back and ready for service. Some would say that for our masters, time = money. That makes me think of the coming singularity and many books and movies, for example the movie "Elysium".

No, that's your bias showing. It means that is how well she recovered that she is able to work. Some people just look for problems.


You say that because you don't have the big sociological picture in mind like I do. Instead of saying "she was able to enjoy life like nothing happened" or something like that, they chose to say that she was able to work again and that says a lot about current cultural and sociological trends.


I highly doubt the journalist meant any more than suggesting her recovery was prompt.



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 07:08 AM
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GetHyped

gosseyn

OccamsRazor04

gosseyn
The thing that shocks me in this is that she is "back to work", like she was just a machine that has been repaired and is now back and ready for service. Some would say that for our masters, time = money. That makes me think of the coming singularity and many books and movies, for example the movie "Elysium".

No, that's your bias showing. It means that is how well she recovered that she is able to work. Some people just look for problems.


You say that because you don't have the big sociological picture in mind like I do. Instead of saying "she was able to enjoy life like nothing happened" or something like that, they chose to say that she was able to work again and that says a lot about current cultural and sociological trends.


I highly doubt the journalist meant any more than suggesting her recovery was prompt.


Yes, exactly, and that's exactly why it is preoccupying, like when asked to draw something, a child draws some disturbing things, then you know there is something wrong.



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 08:01 AM
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gosseyn
Yes, exactly, and that's exactly why it is preoccupying, like when asked to draw something, a child draws some disturbing things, then you know there is something wrong.


Or, you know, the surgeon was making an off-hand comment. I wouldn't be surprised if, given America's healthcare costs and the costs of living (rent/mortgage/bills), a common question was "How long before I can get back to work, Doc?". Being out of work is not a good thing when you have living costs to pay.
edit on 30-3-2014 by GetHyped because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 08:52 AM
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Aww i was expecting to see a skull replaced not just part of a skull



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 09:05 AM
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Snoopy1978
reply to post by gosseyn
 


We're supposed to be grateful of being sent back to work asap. Isn't capitalism a wonderful thing?


I don't think it is just capitalism.

If we were still all hunter-gatherers who went out each day to find nuts and berries and hunt for meat, I suppose the line could have been:
"She is symptom free and back to helping gather food".

If this were a socialist or communist system, the line could have been:
"She is symptom free and back to working to provide to the people".

To me it sounds as if the only issue you have is that they are saying she is able to work again, as if the need or desire to work is inherently a bad thing. The idea of "work" (or providing a service that we or others want us to do) is not limited to capitalist systems.

edit on 3/30/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by Kangaruex4Ewe
 


It would definitely be worth looking into. Although, I can understand how your mother became frustrated with all the rejections. Major surgery and the time for recovery can take a toll on a person.



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 01:14 PM
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reply to post by gosseyn
 


The big picture is that a woman, who would have otherwise died with out the cranial implant, has been able to return to a normal life. Being able to return to work is a blessing, it's not about serving any masters. This young lady has a new lease on life, that's what this story is about. Hopefully other people can experience the success she has had, and they can return to work, go shopping, drive a car, ride a bike....



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 02:28 PM
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3D printers are really the future.. I believe they also can print organs food metal and various amound of other things. . I see these things printing complete skyscrapers with furniture and all in the future... maybe the first long distance spaceship will be printed in space ?



posted on Mar, 30 2014 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by Jennyfrenzy
 


Wow! Its nice to see some positive posts.

I do wonder how long the plastic will hold for.

Interesting read, thanks for posting.



posted on Apr, 8 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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Jennyfrenzy
reply to post by gosseyn
 


The big picture is that a woman, who would have otherwise died with out the cranial implant, has been able to return to a normal life. Being able to return to work is a blessing, it's not about serving any masters. This young lady has a new lease on life, that's what this story is about. Hopefully other people can experience the success she has had, and they can return to work, go shopping, drive a car, ride a bike....


That's not the big picture, because the big picture has also to take into account how others like me, you and the journalist react to that event, and all that forms one big event, that I call the big picture.



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 01:59 AM
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gosseyn

OccamsRazor04

gosseyn
The thing that shocks me in this is that she is "back to work", like she was just a machine that has been repaired and is now back and ready for service. Some would say that for our masters, time = money. That makes me think of the coming singularity and many books and movies, for example the movie "Elysium".

No, that's your bias showing. It means that is how well she recovered that she is able to work. Some people just look for problems.


You say that because you don't have the big sociological picture in mind like I do. Instead of saying "she was able to enjoy life like nothing happened" or something like that, they chose to say that she was able to work again and that says a lot about current cultural and sociological trends.

Congrats on being able to read my mind. Also congrats on not understanding the big picture and knowing what going back to work means. If you understood "current cultural and sociological trends" you would know there are many people who are able to enjoy life, but are too impaired to work, and thus are on disability. The fact she is not going to be on disability, and is able to go to work, means the quality of her life is very high. Congrats on not understanding anything, and kudos for being a mind reader.



posted on Apr, 9 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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reply to post by gosseyn
 


With all due respect, this isn't about you or me. The big picture relates to an individual whose quality of life has improved. This woman has been given a renewed lease on life, and would have otherwise died. The big picture is that this successful surgery will most likely be able to help other people, who like this young lady, would have otherwise died. The big picture is about life and death, not economics.



posted on Apr, 10 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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Kangaruex4Ewe


She chose not to have a plate put in at all. Now she is walking around missing about a softball size piece of her skull.


edit on 3/30/2014 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)


Have you heard of trepanation? You might be interested in the documentary, A Hole In The Head





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