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White House looks to regulate cow flatulence as part of climate agenda!

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posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 03:48 PM
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neo96
reply to post by kaylaluv
 





China has pollution problems because China's government had no regulations in place.


China would get no business if they did which is why American companies, and others go there.

Because that regulation runs them out.



Well, they're gonna have to move on up the road I guess, because Beijing is finally starting to get it.


The city of Beijing will ban the construction of new oil refining, steel, cement and thermal power plants as well as the expansion of existing projects, the local government said in its latest policy document aimed at tackling air pollution.
Firms that fail to install emissions technology, or meet tough pollution standards could be fined up to 500,000 yuan ($82,600) and have their emission permit allocation cut for the following year.


www.chinadaily.com.cn...




posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 





You mean deregulation don't you? Remember you said it yourself:


Feel free to quote anywhere I said 'deregulation'.

Paying attention there?

They are not enforcing the regulation already made.

Clinton 'deregulated' when he ended glass stegall.

And the reason behind it was well they 'weren't following' it anyway.



By the way 'regulation' doesn't stop people from doing things they 'shouldn't'.

if they did bankers would be nice,corporations would be nice, there would be no 'gun violence'.

And there would be no pollution in the world.


edit on 29-3-2014 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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reply to post by kaylaluv
 





Well, they're gonna have to move on up the road I guess, because Beijing is finally starting to get it.


And food will be more expensive, gas is going to be more expensive, and millions of people will be out of work.

And they will be suffering from outsourcing like the west is.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Who the hell is dying from a 'lack of oxygen' ?

Talk about exaggeration.

I had a friend in who grew up in Mexico City - and she told me regularly about schools being closed for a time off and on because of the pollution. Her dad had lung problems and had to leave the city during the winter months because they have a similar inversion situation to what we have here in Denver - only with the incredible amount pollution that comes with a city the size of Mexico

It took them this long to get around to this - out of absolute necessity (2012):

Mexico passes law to reduce carbon pollution

In a move that reflects a global trend, Mexico passed with bipartisan support one of the strongest national climate-change laws so far on April 19. Mexico ranks 11th in the world for both the size of its economy and its level of carbon emissions. - See more at: change.nature.org...

It took me longer to paste all this than it did to find it - and there is so much more out there:

High Pollution Linked To Poor Lung Function Growth In Children In Mexico City

Study: Air pollution causes lung disease in school-age children

Smog in our brains: Researchers are identifying startling connections between air pollution and decreased cognition and well-being.

Air Pollution, Socioeconomic Status, and Children's Cognition in Megacities: The Mexico City Scenario

Eight million MC children experienced serious detrimental effects including neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and cognition deficits (Calderón-Garcidueñas et al., 2008a,b,c, 2011a,b, 2012). Neighborhoods’ proximity to main roadways, unpaved roads, dumps, and factories affect children's health and 27% of the MC population mostly to the north and east falls in this category (Figure ​(Figure11).


Choking smog paralyzes cities in northeast China, closing schools, airports

Pollution kills - and it really is about the children. What else is there?

Oh, yeah - the freedom to do business - and live our lives however we want...well, Neo - dangerous levels of pollution are exactly what we get from living our lives however we want. If I have to make a choice - I choose a healthy planet. Nobody gonna make any money when they're diseased or dead

How ironic that you always choose to wear a gas mask

Is that your idea of freedom?

:-)
edit on 3/29/2014 by Spiramirabilis because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:04 PM
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neo96
reply to post by kaylaluv
 





Well, they're gonna have to move on up the road I guess, because Beijing is finally starting to get it.


And food will be more expensive, gas is going to be more expensive, and millions of people will be out of work.

And they will be suffering from outsourcing like the west is.



Maybe, but I say those are temporary problems that will work themselves out. Dying from cancer or heart disease or asthma due to poor air is NOT temporary.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by Spiramirabilis
 





Nobody gonna make any money when they're diseased or dead


Well dead people can't be spied on or ruled over if their dead either.

And if they are they wouldn't know how 'awesome' government is that is wants to 'save' them from themselves.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Clinton 'deregulated' when he ended glass stegall.
Clinton didn't repeal Glass Stegall. Of course, he could have vetoed the bill but that wouldn't have accomplished anything since it had passed overwhelmingly by the House and Senate. But the banks took full advantage of it which resulted in the banking crisis.

It was not regulation which caused the crisis, it was relaxed regulation.



By the way 'regulation' doesn't stop people from doing things they 'shouldn't'.
Right. But it cuts the numbers of those who do down by a whole lot and insures that those who do get caught are dealt with.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by kaylaluv
 





Maybe, but I say those are temporary problems


Those are not 'temporary' problems.

They have been ongoing in this country for decades, and it is not getting any better.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


The banks dispensing the loans actually engaged in a number of fraudulent activities including, but not limited to, robo signing. Basically what was going on was this. When the derivatives market was deregulated, largely by the encouragement of Alan Greenspan, it made derivatives a tremendous boon for the financial services industry as a whole. It became incredibly profitable to basically dispense mortgages out in mass and then, turn around and sell them in the newly deregulated derivatives market. How they did this was by willfully splitting toxic CDOs (collateralized debt obligations) so that they would be rated higher and appear more desirable, thanks to Moody's and Standard & Poors involvement. At the same time, these CDOs were being backed by entities such as AIG in what is called a credit default swap. When those toxic CDOs showed their true nature, the entire house of cards came down.

This all didn't happen because of regulation but deregulation. Deregulation allowed banks previously blocked from engaging in investment and commercial bank activities to engage in them, making that sale of mortgages as a CDO very profitable and deregulation of those derivatives was one of the top reasons why everything went kaboom. The derivatives market is really intense to this day. I stopped looking at what one of my profs, a partner at a large accounting firm, called "her worst nightmare" after it hit the $4 trillion mark.

Here's just a few of the banks and loan processing services who chose to do the above actions and weren't forced to do it:

Lender Processing Services: www.nytimes.com...
Bank of America: www.businessweek.com...
Citibank: www.bloomberg.com...

And more on that whole Fannie and Freddie bit. That was actually due to activities by companies like Countrywide, which was a subsidiary of Bank of America (hence why they were found liable). Here's what they were doing to Fannie and Freddie. They were the biggest entity that engaged in robo-signing practices.

dealbook.nytimes.com...



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 





t was not regulation which caused the crisis, it was relaxed regulation.


Yet again regulation DOES NOT STOP ANYTHING.




Right. But it cuts the numbers of those who do down by a whole lot and insures that those who do get caught are dealt with.


No it doesn't.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:10 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


I think you mistake my reply and sentiment on the photo as well as my general position on environmental issues. What you write would suggest I don't take environmental issues seriously, which couldn't be further from the truth.

I disagree pretty strongly on the "hip fads" of the "environmental movement" we're rallied to go Rah Rah Rah to like Pavlov ringing a bell for his dog. That's where I tend to part company a bit...or A LOT with the "movement" as it exists in society and media. However, I recall "We are the World" from being a young child made to sing it endlessly for how far back my awareness of environmental issues goes.

We are killing ourselves by killing our fresh water supplies, general air quality on regional if not greater levels, altering the balance of the Oceans themselves in minor ways which cascade into great impact for the engine that runs the climate itself. We poison our food and potable water by choice and call them additives or artificial sweetening or colors. Yet, we focus on ...Cattle.

The base problem which all this is about, here, is methane gas. A nasty gas when it's released uncontrolled into the atmosphere in great quantity. I do not, for a moment, take cattle as being a major threat for the production of Methane gas on a planetary scale. Cattle aren't even the popular livestock on every continent, let alone every nation...Yet, planetary is the impact we're guided to look at.

Your photo is of a trash dump. Those are what every single human habitation on Earth beyond a few in a tent, have. They all produce the gas we'd blame cows for. They produce it in quantities by sheer economy of scale, that make cattle look like the sideline issue I believe they are. They'd also be expensive and destructive to fix beyond what the public would ever be able to stomach, given how ubiquitous the problem really is.

So, that's my take on cow farts vs. the very real and lethal threat of Methane gas in terms of sources for consideration. We'd disagree simply on priority of concern, not the root of concern itself.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 





The banks dispensing the loans actually engaged in a number of fraudulent activities including, but not limited to, robo signing


Really ?

How is that possible since that is what regulation is suppose to stop.

Doesn't stop evil bankers.

And it doesn't stop pollution.

The only thing regulation does is make it someone elses problem.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:12 PM
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They must need some cheap distractions away from all the nuclear war talk.. Cow gas should do the trick..

Anyways, letting or approving an administration like the current one to "fix" anything by more regulations and expecting success is the definition of insanity. It fits that old saying perfectly. Just like health care has been fixed. Enjoy!



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Well dead people can't be spied on or ruled over if their dead either.

And if they are they wouldn't know how 'awesome' government is that is wants to 'save' them from themselves.

Oh, my - Neo... They musta plumb tuckered you out! :-)

What good is freedom on a dying planet - even assuming we have to give up our freedoms at all?

Maybe you think you will enjoy your unregulated life and freedom to run a business however you want from inside your climate controlled pod

I'd rather walk outside in the sunshine and breathe in fresh air with the rest of my fellow earthlings

But, to each their own

:-)

edit on 3/29/2014 by Spiramirabilis because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by neo96
 


Yet again regulation DOES NOT STOP ANYTHING.
It prevented the collusion between investment and commercial banks which led to the crisis. It cleaned up Lake Erie.


No it doesn't.
Yes it does.



edit on 3/29/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 





We are killing ourselves by killing our fresh water supplies, general air quality on regional if not greater levels, altering the balance of the Oceans themselves in minor ways which cascade into great impact for the engine that runs the climate itself. We poison our food and potable water by choice and call them additives or artificial sweetening or colors. Yet, we focus on ...Cattle.


Then they turn around and try to legalize illegal substances so they can put toxic stuff in their bodies.

Then turn around and mandate the state that big pharamceuticals are 'human rights' that end, and prohibit human life from being created.

They have a bad case of cognitive dissonance there.

edit on 29-3-2014 by neo96 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 





It stopped the collusion between investment and commercial banks which led to the crisis.


No it did not.




Yes it does.


NO IT DOESN'T.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by Spiramirabilis
 





Maybe you think you will enjoy your unregulated life


That is what liberal means.

In the classical sense.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:19 PM
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This is just another way to kill off the family farm. They'll "regulate" methane emissions from cows by slapping a yearly per head tax on them. It's been floated before. Sure, $25/cow doesn't sound like much, but when you start to think about the size of your average family farm herd ... that adds up pretty quickly and gets onerous.

All of you who want sustainable faming and love your local small farmer who gets you your sustainable, grass fed stuff ought to be up in arms against this because the only ones who will be able to easily absorb this hit will be big agri-business.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 04:20 PM
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neo96
reply to post by Spiramirabilis
 



Maybe you think you will enjoy your unregulated life


That is what liberal means.

In the classical sense.


Environmentalists are not that different from survivalists Neo - they're just less selfish

They want nice stuff for everyone

:-)



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