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The Aguayo - Ancient Andean Wisdom for Moms

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posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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To make this thread is something I had in my mind for a long time. If you pay attention, the ancient practice I'm about to describe encloses one of the pillars of the andean education and also a survival technique. Definitely part of the knowledge that survived for centuries. This practice is still in use, who visit Peru or Bolivia probably had the chance to observe it. It is also known in Ecuador, Chile, Argentina and Central America.



An ancient Andean practice of the women of the Andes is to carry their baby on their back, a custom that dates back to the time of the Inca Empire. The blanket they use is called "Aguayo" or "Awayu" is part of Andean cosmology.




The awayu (Aymara for diaper and for a woven blanket to carry things on the back or to cover the back,[1][2][3] hispanicized spelling aguayo),[4] q'ipirina or q'ipina (Quechua q'ipi bundle, -na a suffix, [5][6] hispanicized spellings quepina, queperina, quepirina, quipirina) is a rectangular carrying cloth used in traditional communities in the Andes region of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru. Aymara and Quechua people use it to carry small children or all kinds of items in it on their backs. It is similar to a lliklla and sometimes regarded as a sinonym[7] but larger and knotted at the front. The awayus typically feature colorful stripes intercalated with rhombuses and other figures with symbolic values.


This useful fabric is also used in other ways when there are no babies to take care of.




The real Aguayo (Aguayo native) is a hand-woven fabric, and used by women in the Altiplano of Peru, Bolivia and Argentina. Each woman has her own Aguayo. It can be made ​​from llama wool, alpaca or sheep, dyed in bright natural colors. Formerly men were those who used these tissues Aguayo.

These large squares of fabric used to carry babies and toddlers in the back, to sit, put food and any class of products.


Here is a video of a woman from Cuzco, showing 2 diferent ways to use the aguayo, the first one allows the baby to take a nap in an incredible corfortable position, the second way restricts the legs and arms of the baby, according to elder people it makes the baby stronger, the aguayo acts like a little gym when when the baby tries to release his body.



Here a woman from Guatemala showing another way to use the aguayo, this way lets the baby observe what the mother does all the time.



As you can see, this custom also allows the mother to continue with her work without neglecting their children, is a superb audiovisual learning method for the child. At early age, the baby can observe the mother's hands and learn about daily tasks.



The baby can also observe the interaction between mother and other people, accelerating the learning of the verbal form of communication. The constant visual stimulus and the sense of safety keeps the child calm and not crying. In cold weather this cosstumbre allows the baby stay warm by body heat of the mother. Given the intense cold of the Andes, this is vital.



www.musef.org.bo...
en.wikipedia.org...
www.mamakolla.com...
www.decotienda.com.ar...
www.casadelcorregidor.pe...
www.flickr.com...


edit on 28-3-2014 by Trueman because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-3-2014 by Trueman because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


I know one thing, I'm pretty sure that those awayus don't empower them. My parents are from Guatemala and los indigenas are treated as second-class citizens. I'm not trying to ruin your thread, but visiting Guatemala as a kid, I would see the Indians treated in ways that would make an American, that's used to equal rights, cringe. I won't get mad if this post is deleted and deemed off-topic.
And on the flip-side, it also bothers me when people with a pro-socialist agenda exploit the Indians and encourage them to become revolutionaries. It's all bad in those parts of the world.
Carry on...

ETA: I'm sorry about my post. Those pictures just bring back memories.

edit on 28-3-2014 by brazenalderpadrescorpio because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:26 PM
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The baby can also observe the interaction between mother and other people, accelerating the learning of the verbal form of communication. The constant visual stimulus and the sense of safety keeps the child calm and not crying. - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...

A simple blanket keeping a child safe and warm, while allowing the child to learn.....hmmm, while in the uk we have tv programs telling mothers to throw their child into a bed and just leave it to cry!



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:37 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


A countries prosperity is linked directly to it's customs and culture. Evidently your doing something right.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:42 PM
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It definitely fits with a school of thought held even in this modern era that a baby gets lots of brain development just by experiencing mother's movement in utero and up to the first year.
As we'll as the general sense of "attachment " that is so hotly debated these days.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Without knowing the program in question, I can only say that there is nothing wrong with letting a child alone for a bit if the alternative is for you to lose you temper and potentially do something you will later regret. I seriously doubt anyone advocates it as a primary means of dealing with a crying child.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:58 PM
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ketsuko
reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Without knowing the program in question, I can only say that there is nothing wrong with letting a child alone for a bit if the alternative is for you to lose you temper and potentially do something you will later regret. I seriously doubt anyone advocates it as a primary means of dealing with a crying child.

Oh but they DO!!! That is precisley what they are telling people they should do. Their advice is NEVER go to a crying baby. And even worse, people are obeying!
Why would they push such horrible advice? Because it will lead to a generation of people who have no family attachment, making them easier to control.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


preparing kids for the cold reality of the world is a good thing. then again I am the child of a Russian immigrant and a native Canadian



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:14 PM
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crucified
reply to post by VoidHawk
 


preparing kids for the cold reality of the world is a good thing. then again I am the child of a Russian immigrant and a native Canadian
Neglecting a child is NOT a good thing!
Experiments in the past proved that the less contact a child has is detrimental to its development, a child that is NEVER picked up will actualy die! Children need contact, and the more they get the better their development.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:24 PM
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VoidHawk

ketsuko
reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Without knowing the program in question, I can only say that there is nothing wrong with letting a child alone for a bit if the alternative is for you to lose you temper and potentially do something you will later regret. I seriously doubt anyone advocates it as a primary means of dealing with a crying child.

Oh but they DO!!! That is precisley what they are telling people they should do. Their advice is NEVER go to a crying baby. And even worse, people are obeying!
Why would they push such horrible advice? Because it will lead to a generation of people who have no family attachment, making them easier to control.



Now that is sick.

We always went to our son when he cried, and when I was home with him, he was either always in my lap or sitting next to me so I could talk to him or play with him.

We didn't start weaning him off expecting us to come when he cried (in the middle of the night) until he was over a year, and even then, we still went right away to make sure he was dry, fed, etc., but started to ignore the after crying at slightly longer intervals between checks. Now, he has given up on the idea that if he wants to wake up at 3 a.m., we will oblige him by staying awake with him, which was the point of ignoring him. He'll entertain himself in bed, but we'll still check on him initially if he needs it.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:35 PM
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reply to post by brazenalderpadrescorpio
 


I see nothing wrong with your post.

I am interested in the history behind those hats that the women of the Andes wear.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Did I say to neglect a child? No. so stop putting text in my bubble. Do a little comparison of the kids of today and the kids of past generations and you prove my point.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 10:01 PM
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I knew making this thread will bring a debate about the way we take care of kids today, I'm glad to see this on debate.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 10:01 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 

Very nice thread, S&F's.
In Central Mexico, I have seen the Tamahara native people use this same garment design for everything including dirt road repair!!
The Middle East have shebab scarves that are equivilent in purpose and key to surviving heat, wind, and sand. The US military has included these as regular issue apparel now in Afghanistan.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 10:12 PM
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brazenalderpadrescorpio
reply to post by Trueman
 


I know one thing, I'm pretty sure that those awayus don't empower them. My parents are from Guatemala and los indigenas are treated as second-class citizens. I'm not trying to ruin your thread, but visiting Guatemala as a kid, I would see the Indians treated in ways that would make an American, that's used to equal rights, cringe. I won't get mad if this post is deleted and deemed off-topic.
And on the flip-side, it also bothers me when people with a pro-socialist agenda exploit the Indians and encourage them to become revolutionaries. It's all bad in those parts of the world.
Carry on...

ETA: I'm sorry about my post. Those pictures just bring back memories.

edit on 28-3-2014 by brazenalderpadrescorpio because: (no reason given)


I'm sorry for the bad memories you had with this thread, but consider the effectiveness of ancient methods like this one can be observed in an enviroment where its cosmogony is present and no external pathological society influence is present.
edit on 28-3-2014 by Trueman because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


as well as the respect we can pay to this culture by observing this simple yet effective achievement for what it is: a gem of human ingenuity.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 10:27 PM
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bigfatfurrytexan
reply to post by Trueman
 


as well as the respect we can pay to this culture by observing this simple yet effective achievement for what it is: a gem of human ingenuity.


The lack of malice is evident in this ancient practice. Consider the mother must show a respectful behavior all the time, knowing her child is observing everything she says and do and learning from that.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 10:40 PM
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Erm, carrying the baby in a sling or wrap isn't a new concept in the US, I had a sling for my kids. It was much easier than carting around a cumbersome stroller while out & about (until they got heavy enough to be hell on my back no matter how they were settled) The conversing rules may be different, but the aspect of carrying is not new. I see a good portion of babies being carried around that way where I live, and they're not the immigrants doing it. It's not a majority, maybe a quarter to a third, but it's becoming more prevalent.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by Trueman
 


Don't get me wrong, I completely see the effectiveness the Aguayo has for the child. I think that Western society, with its lack of spirituality, has no access to this wisdom.



posted on Mar, 29 2014 @ 02:22 AM
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brazenalderpadrescorpio
reply to post by Trueman
 


Don't get me wrong, I completely see the effectiveness the Aguayo has for the child. I think that Western society, with its lack of spirituality, has no access to this wisdom.


Im sorry... who? Lack of spirituality?
Explain a little more.



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