Cardioverter Defibrillator implant

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posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:13 PM
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Hello all, I had the misfortune of dieing two weeks ago and now I am the recipient of a Cardioverter Defibrillator implant and I am looking for any helpful information as what to expect or not to expect regarding this implant.

I tried the search to no avail, so here I am.

Two weeks ago I sat at the kitchen table at 6 am and called out to my wife to phone for an ambulance.
She looked at me and asked why?.....next thing I see is her looking down at me on the floor trying to breath but without much luck.

The Fire/Rescue was on site first closely followed by the EMT's and I got the air I was screaming for ASAP then it kind of gets blank.

Next thing I know I am in the Ambulance and they are putting in the pipeline IV's in both elbow joints and screaming at me to keep my eyes open.

At this point I am very weak and cannot even lift up my arm which fell off of the gurney and the EMS guy yelling at me was really pissing me off.

All I wanted to do was shut my eyes but he kept screaming at me to look at him and I wanted to punch him in the face if I was able :-)

It turns out that my Heart rate was 240BPM and not slowing down ......now wonder the EMT was excited and yelling.
I held that heart rate for over half an hour and when we got to the hospital they were waiting right at the door for me.
20 seconds later the trauma doc says to me.." I am going to shock you now and this is going to hurt"

Between gasps for air I said get to it please, I went over a foot in the air and landed to the smell of smoke.
There was one hell of a bang too but apparently only I could hear it?

Instantly I could breath and all was good withing seconds, next thing I know is I am hanging onto the docs arm and looking at him as he is asking how I feel.


My very first coherent words spoken since my attack were these and they were loud......HOLEEEEEEE F***K followed by silence then all these people start clapping.

Once I lifted my head up to look what all the racket was about, there had to be at least 15 people standing around me 3 of which were the ambulance guys and gals.

There I lay in all my glory as I lost my bodily functions when they zapped me and nobody cared the least.
Before they shipped me off to the ICU I thanked them all as best as I could and let me tell you it was very emotional.

So two weeks in different hospitals and two surgeries here I am now black and blue and wondering if anyone else has had this happen?
Now being a new to these implants I am hoping that someone here has some personal experience with them and might enlighten me to what I am in for now.
The monster they implanted in me is a Medtronic Defibrillator plus a pace maker which is not enabled at this time.

Any words of wisdom would be much appreciated indeed.

Many thanks.
Regards, Iwinder
edit on 28-3-2014 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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I don't have one, or want the need for one, but Holey stuffing man....

I'm not real personable like but I have seen you around and read your replies the last couple years, not that that matters...

You told your story well, and I'm sincerely glad you told it....and I'm really glad you had the chance to tell it.

Keep on keeping on and all that,






posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


My father has one of those and I must say that it is odd to see when it kicks in. He kind of jerks a bit and then goes "Phew". But he's still here and for that I am grateful. He did tell me that it does hurt for a second and then everything calms down.

Good luck.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by Treespeaker
 


Thanks for the kind words, yeah I have no want for one of these Zappers either but I must accept the challenge I guess :-)

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:37 PM
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TDawgRex
reply to post by Iwinder
 


My father has one of those and I must say that it is odd to see when it kicks in. He kind of jerks a bit and then goes "Phew". But he's still here and for that I am grateful. He did tell me that it does hurt for a second and then everything calms down.

Good luck.


Thanks for the information TD so I can expect to do a little bit of the worm then if it kicks in?
I just had the bandages taken off yesterday and they ran some tests to make sure it is ready to go, no zapping just computer stuff.

Until they actually tested it yesterday I was pretty spooked that it might not work if I needed it but I know now it will kick in when required.

Myself as well am very grateful to be here and posting right this moment, pretty scary when the trauma doc tells you that odds were very good you should be dead.


Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:46 PM
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Iwinder
Hello all, I had the misfortune of dieing two weeks ago and now I am the recipient of a Cardioverter Defibrillator implant...

It turns out that my Heart rate was 240BPM and not slowing down ..." I am going to shock you now and this is going to hurt"

So two weeks in different hospitals and two surgeries here I am now black and blue and wondering if anyone else has had this happen?

Now being a new to these implants I am hoping that someone here has some personal experience with them and might enlighten me to what I am in for now.

The monster they implanted in me is a Medtronic Defibrillator plus a pace maker which is not enabled at this time.

Any words of wisdom would be much appreciated indeed.


Welcome to the family, brother. HAR!

Well, sounds like you had a-fib with rvr. I have always had something called a WPW, which is a sort of bad conduction path in my heart. I successfully covered that little gem up for my entire Army career because the delta waves it causes on my EKG are sort of subtle and the Army docs missed it. When mine goes off, my heart rate goes to about 250. I can generally stop it within a few seconds, the worst I ever had went about ten minutes. Our medics knew about it and didn't say anything, and carried a couple of vials of adenocard just for me, I actually got it once in the field during the record setting ten minute session.

If you had WPW or some other SVT, they would likely have used adenocard on you first. It doesn't work for a-fib/RVR though, and in fact you can use adenocard to distinguish between SVTs and a-fib/rvr, because it'll often stop an SVT but won't touch an a-fib.

Anyways, the Medtronics is a fine unit for an AICD/pacer.

It likely having been a-fib, I would expect them to put you on an anti-coagulant, probably coumadin but maybe one of the newer ones like Effient or Xarelto. If you have a choice, I'd go with a newer one, it's a pain in the ass to regulate coumadin even if it is cheaper. You will also probably be on some sort of anti-arrhythmic like amiodarone.

There will be a period of time during which they want you to keep your arm in a sling and not raise it over your head while the wires grow into your heart a bit better. You should do what they say in that regard.

You might want to keep an override magnet at hand somewhere in the house - they look like a donut typically. It's not unheard of for a new AICD to lose its mind and start popping you every five minutes or so. You'll want a way to cut that off. Keep your distance from microwave ovens and big radio transmitters. I wouldn't hold my cell phone close to that side.

Oh, and if you're ever in hospital again, make sure they know it's an AICD. With an AICD, the wiring runs INSIDE a vein instead of just corkscrewing into your heart from the outside like a pacer. Where this comes into play is if the doc decides to put in a central line and doesn't know you've got wiring in there before he starts. You can get the catheter tangled in the wiring and have to have major surgery to fix it if you're not careful.

eta: if they put you on a major anti-coagulant, there's more ramifications. One, you can pretty much put paid to your days on a motorcycle or cross-country bike if you are so inclined. Also no more jumping out of perfectly good planes, and you will want to stay off ladders as much as possible. Boxing and MMA are done. Hell, you won't be able to do anything where you will fall or get popped in the nog, even really bumped around like doing canoeing or rafting on rapids.
edit on 28-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Hi Iwinder.
Wow! So glad your still here!
You deserve a



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:54 PM
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Welcome to the family, brother. HAR! Well, sounds like you had a-fib with rvr. I have always had something called a WPW, which is a sort of bad conduction path in my heart. I successfully covered that little gem up for my entire Army career because the delta waves it causes on my EKG are sort of subtle and the Army docs missed it. When mine goes off, my heart rate goes to about 250. I can generally stop it within a few seconds, the worst I ever had went about ten minutes. Our medics knew about it and didn't say anything, and carried a couple of vials of adenocard just for me, I actually got it once in the field during the record setting ten minute session. If you had WPW or some other SVT, they would likely have used adenocard on you first. It doesn't work for a-fib/RVR though, and in fact you can use adenocard to distinguish between SVTs and a-fib/rvr, because it'll often stop an SVT but won't touch an a-fib. Anyways, the Medtronics is a fine unit for an AICD/pacer. It likely having been a-fib, I would expect them to put you on an anti-coagulant, probably coumadin but maybe one of the newer ones like Effient or Xarelto. If you have a choice, I'd go with a newer one, it's a pain in the ass to regulate coumadin even if it is cheaper. You will also probably be on some sort of anti-arrhythmic like amiodarone. There will be a period of time during which they want you to keep your arm in a sling and not raise it over your head while the wires grow into your heart a bit better. You should do what they say in that regard. You might want to keep an override magnet at hand somewhere in the house - they look like a donut typically. It's not unheard of for a new AICD to lose its mind and start popping you every five minutes or so. You'll want a way to cut that off. Keep your distance from microwave ovens and big radio transmitters. I wouldn't hold my cell phone close to that side. Oh, and if you're ever in hospital again, make sure they know it's an AICD. With an AICD, the wiring runs INSIDE a vein instead of just corkscrewing into your heart from the outside like a pacer. Where this comes into play is if the doc decides to put in a central line and doesn't know you've got wiring in there before he starts. You can get the catheter tangled in the wiring and have to have major surgery to fix it if you're not careful.
reply to post by Bedlam
 


I cannot thank you enough for your post which is loaded with good first hand information!
Yeah they got me on thinners and I am in my twentieth year suffering from Cardio Myopothy so some of this heart stuff is new to me and some is old school.

But going 240 BPM for half an hour is all new and very scary indeed.....I was panting like a dog in the desert after a 30 mile run.

Again many thanks for your wisdom.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Oh, yeah, build yourself a nice Faraday cage in the event of nuclear war. You won't want an EMP unless you just LIKE being popped a few hundred times until the batteries wear out. It might catch on fire or rupture, I suppose, as an alternative. None of that sounds very appealing.



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:01 PM
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VoidHawk
reply to post by Iwinder
 


Hi Iwinder.
Wow! So glad your still here!
You deserve a


Thanks Void, Its going to be awhile before I can get to a nice cold lager but that I will eventually.

I pretty glad to be here too!..even if I am black and blue.

My heels and my shoulders were black after my launch and landing on a hospital gurney .

It was about 3 days later and the nurse that was bathing me said you look like you have been in a car accident.
Good to hear when there is no mirror LOL

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 



Hope it helps you. Glad you didn't hit anyone, if you do wake up when they are cutting on you the doctors don't have any humor when you hit one. Did they say how long the battery last? Do they have to replace the battery or is there a way to recharge it when it runs low?



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by irgust
 


This unit I have in me says the battery will last 12 years, once depleted the unit needs replacing.
After 4 visits to the hospital that implanted it we can get a home unit that will monitor my unit and send all the information off to the hospital 24/7.

Right now we have to travel 60K's there and back for appointments so the home monitor will make life easier for us next year.

We have to do personal visits for the first year though,

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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irgust
Did they say how long the battery last? Do they have to replace the battery or is there a way to recharge it when it runs low?


It's a lithium-silver-vanadium battery and isn't rechargeable. The good news is that Medtronics has way longer life than other ICDs, and you can often go five to seven years without having to replace the unit, especially if it never goes off and they don't use the pacing function, in which case it might go even longer.

eta: 12 years is a great improvement. You used to get eight if you were lucky. Replacing the unit is an office procedure.
edit on 28-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


The only thing that interferes with the pacer part of the IVCD is a magnet, that's how you turn it off. As far as the defibber goes, who knows...Hopefully an EMO WON'T happen and you'll both be o.k.

edit on 28-3-2014 by lovebeck because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Sounds like you were taken care of, by some pretty awesome docs and nurses! Good for you. They knew what to do and didn't ho-hum while you were taching away at 240 bpm!

Did they say it was afib? Seems AWFUL fast for an uncontrolled A Fib, but with your hx. of cardiomyopathy, I guess that could be it.

Almost sounds like a supra-ventricular tachycardia or even v-tach, with a pulse...The reason u felt you couldn't breathe is because your heart was beating so fast, it didn't have time to fill with the oxygenated blood your body was so desperately needing.

You must be one tough SOB, so remember that next time your sick/under the weather. The tough guys and gals always make it, never quit, and never give up. They're my fave types of patients to care for, them and WW2 vets. They take 1st place!

As far as your IVCD, it's a GOOD thing they placed the dual action model in ya. You never know when that pacer might come in handy.

As far as what t expect, I cannot tell u from personal experience, just from my years of being an RN. I worked with cardiac/cardiac surgery patients for many, many moons. I DO KNOW that if your defibber goes off, and someone is touching you when it does, they'll get a hefty shock themselves! You'll probably have a lightheaded or dizziness type feeling prior to it shocking you, so if you feel like that, get ready. Are they allowing you to drive yet?

Cardiac Rehab? DO IT! Ask your doctor about it at your next appointment. Also, watch what you eat and follow the diet your CARDIOLOGIST recommends. If you're having trouble, have them book an appointment with a hospital type nutritionist...They should be able to do that without much trouble. Those gals know how to make bland taste great.

Watch your insertion site for signs/symptoms of infection: redness, swelling, drainage, warmth. If you experience anything like this, call your doc immediately. Those suckers do have a habit of getting infected after they're placed, however, they are doing more to prevent this from occurring than they used to.

Take care of yourself, take it easy, and follow up with your cardiologist and electrophysiologist regularly. Don't skip appointments, even if you're feeling great. Also, make sure you're "phoning in" to have your device checked. If they haven't talked to you about that, they will. Having the device read/checked is EXTREMELY important...They download all the information and can tell how your heart rate & rhythm has been doing, as well as how the device is functioning and if it has "gone off."

Kudos to the first responders and the ER folks...You're a lucky dude!

Take care and feel free to u2u me if you have any questions...I know an awful lot about all that cardiac stuff!





posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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lovebeck
reply to post by Iwinder
 


Sounds like you were taken care of, by some pretty awesome docs and nurses! Good for you. They knew what to do and didn't ho-hum while you were taching away at 240 bpm!

Did they say it was afib? Seems AWFUL fast for an uncontrolled A Fib, but with your hx. of cardiomyopathy, I guess that could be it.

Almost sounds like a supra-ventricular tachycardia or even v-tach, with a pulse...The reason u felt you couldn't breathe is because your heart was beating so fast, it didn't have time to fill with the oxygenated blood your body was so desperately needing.

You must be one tough SOB, so remember that next time your sick/under the weather. The tough guys and gals always make it, never quit, and never give up. They're my fave types of patients to care for, them and WW2 vets. They take 1st place!

As far as your IVCD, it's a GOOD thing they placed the dual action model in ya. You never know when that pacer might come in handy.

As far as what t expect, I cannot tell u from personal experience, just from my years of being an RN. I worked with cardiac/cardiac surgery patients for many, many moons. I DO KNOW that if your defibber goes off, and someone is touching you when it does, they'll get a hefty shock themselves! You'll probably have a lightheaded or dizziness type feeling prior to it shocking you, so if you feel like that, get ready. Are they allowing you to drive yet?

Cardiac Rehab? DO IT! Ask your doctor about it at your next appointment. Also, watch what you eat and follow the diet your CARDIOLOGIST recommends. If you're having trouble, have them book an appointment with a hospital type nutritionist...They should be able to do that without much trouble. Those gals know how to make bland taste great.

Watch your insertion site for signs/symptoms of infection: redness, swelling, drainage, warmth. If you experience anything like this, call your doc immediately. Those suckers do have a habit of getting infected after they're placed, however, they are doing more to prevent this from occurring than they used to.

Take care of yourself, take it easy, and follow up with your cardiologist and electrophysiologist regularly. Don't skip appointments, even if you're feeling great. Also, make sure you're "phoning in" to have your device checked. If they haven't talked to you about that, they will. Having the device read/checked is EXTREMELY important...They download all the information and can tell how your heart rate & rhythm has been doing, as well as how the device is functioning and if it has "gone off."

Kudos to the first responders and the ER folks...You're a lucky dude!

Take care and feel free to u2u me if you have any questions...I know an awful lot about all that cardiac stuff!




Great post and no doubt in my mind you know your stuff, Yep they blasted me 20 seconds inside the door and a good thing too because I was told I should have arrived DOA.

All I know at this time is that it was the bottom of my heart that screwed up and with my pre existing condition they said there could be nothing worse than what happened to me that morning.

I don't think of myself as a tough guy, what I feel kept me going was that EMS guy constantly harping at me to keep my eyes open and to stay right with him......I really really wanted to punch him out because of all the screaming at me......I can now see how he kept my attention when all I wanted was to close my eyes.


Yeah I am getting some weeping ( blood ) at the top a bit but it has only been a week today, my left breast is very swollen and so is my armpit but things should improve I hope.

The wife took some pictures the other day and I sure do look a lot better now but still very very sore at this point.

Thanks for your very informative reply and I just might U2 you with some questions or the wife might as well if your don't mind.
The wife is YogaGinns here on ATS ....

Ok one last thing the wife just said I had V tach as well whatever that means.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:06 PM
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Iwinder

Ok one last thing the wife just said I had V tach as well whatever that means.

Regards, Iwinder


That's a LOT worse than an a-fib/rvr. Were the ambulance guys ready to shock you? If you had v-tach in our facility and had dyspnea and falling bp, I'd have prepared to have cardioverted you on the spot. Unstable v-tach is nothing to play with.

At the very least I'd have loaded you with amio.
edit on 28-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:11 PM
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Bedlam

Iwinder

Ok one last thing the wife just said I had V tach as well whatever that means.

Regards, Iwinder


That's a LOT worse than an a-fib/rvr. Were the ambulance guys ready to shock you? If you had v-tach in our facility and had dyspnea and falling bp, I'd have cardioverted you on the spot. Unstable v-tach is nothing to play with.


Yeah once they got me out to the ambulance the EMT's took the time to put the shocker pads in place and boot up the box thingy, that is also when they put in the pipeline IV'S in my elbows and that is also when the guy was giving me hell and telling me to stay tuned in no uncertain terms.

After the fact everybody involved said I should have not survived that episode, guess I showed them eh LOL

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:15 PM
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As a EMT I have hit a few people with a AED(Automated external defibrillator) and some complained that was no fun ether.

seses



posted on Mar, 28 2014 @ 09:17 PM
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lovebeck
Did they say it was afib? Seems AWFUL fast for an uncontrolled A Fib, but with your hx. of cardiomyopathy, I guess that could be it.


I think my all time record with a reentrant SVT was 290-300, they couldn't keep track of the count to be sure. Everything was far and wee for a few seconds. You don't move a lot of blood at 300 bpm.





 
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