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A mysterious object found on beach Maldives Baarah

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posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 01:41 PM
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squittles

zayonara
If that's rust and corrosion that I see on the top left of that "valve" this is probably not from MH370.



Yeah, not to burst anyone's bubble, but there is a substantial amount of corrosion on that vessel; zoom in on the skin and notice the pitting and cracking. And worse, on the lower-right, it looks as though the skin was eaten through, with some discolorations around it, that suggest it was breaking down from the inside. I can't imagine it being in that condition inside a flying a/c.

Hopefully, when they clean(ed) it off, they'll be a stamped part number that can be used to determine what it is, and what vessels might have such a container on-board, and perhaps hazard a guess as to its provenance.

My lottery pick is its from the B-1 lost in the area a number of years ago - very small chance, but better than it being from MH370.

IMO, of course.


Could also be that if this is indeed part of the Halon system this was what failed on the plane causing the crash. Possibly had been in bad condition and failed during flight. If the Halon system failed, would that kill everyone on board a pressurized aircraft?




posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 01:46 PM
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Vasa Croe

civpop
It is on cnn now just seen this, its on cnn I report

Cnn I report link




About time....but that is still just the I report for CNN, not really being blasted out there for anyone to look at.


I just saw who reported this...YAY!!!

It's the ireport I submitted 2 days ago. Yep, I'm binksmom..


Now, to see if it's picked up by other news outlets. It does say it's not vetted yet by CNN.

ireport.cnn.com... s%29

Des


edit on 27-3-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 01:48 PM
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Destinyone

Vasa Croe

civpop
It is on cnn now just seen this, its on cnn I report

Cnn I report link




About time....but that is still just the I report for CNN, not really being blasted out there for anyone to look at.


I just saw who reported this...YAY!!!

It's the ireport I submitted 2 days ago. Yep, I'm binksmom..


Now, to see if it's picked up by other news outlets. It does say it's not vetted yet by CNN.

Des


NICE!!



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


The halon system is only in the cargo hold. It would have had to leak up into the passenger compartment somehow, in a big enough cloud that it filled the compartment if it was going to kill everyone on board.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by squittles
 


That's a very real possibility. The B-1 carries one for each engine, and it's been about the right amount of time for heavy debris to start washing up on shore.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


Not wanting to get in the middle of this argument, but I wanted to point out that about a while ago, iirc, after INMARSAT provided the two arcs, but before they definitively said "Southern Corridor", I went trolling for AIS data to see what ships might be in the Southern Indian ocean, and I noticed an AIS craft type of "Wing In Ground", classified as a "Search and Rescue" craft with a Kazak registration in the area roughly between Reunion Island and the the French Southern Islands. I'm afraid I don't recall course, speed, or any other information - but recall, AIS is for "ships", not aircraft.

No idea what it was there for, or what specific type of craft - at one end of the spectrum of "WIG" craft is something like this:

en.wikipedia.org... which is basically a amphibious seaplane, but further along comes something like this: en.wikipedia.org... which is a true ground effects craft - I really doubt something like that was out in the middle of the Indian Ocean.

Just reporting what AIS said was there - I have no idea what it was, or what it was doing there, or even if it was just a figment of AIS' imagination - I mean, what would a Kazakh SAR plane be doing *there*? Just that its AIS data reported it.

Carry on.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 05:28 PM
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Vasa Croe

championoftruth

tommyjo
reply to post by championoftruth
 


The Japanese currently operate the most rugged and proven search and rescue flying boat. Even they wouldn't consider operating it in such an unpredictable area. The conditions are far too variable and the risks too great. That is why the Japanese sent their P-3 Orions rather than their flying boats and the Chinese sent their IL-76s rather than their flying boats.

See section on following link on rough water operations.

Flying Boat link

Japanese flying boats

en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org...

Chinese

en.wikipedia.org...


if you are that scared you should never go near the water.i mean you might drown or get wet.

seriously the excuses are just ridiculous.i mean you have hundreds of boat in this DANGEROUS WEATHER there but for some strange reason a flying boat is so fragile it must stay in its hanger.

i mean as soon as you see a storm coming you take off.takes 30 seconds to be airborne.


so simple so easy.


Have you ever been on a boat in really open ocean? Flying planes would not be able to handle this area. Not sure why this is so tough to understand.

The ships they have searching here are much larger than a flying boat and are made for this type of open ocean. It isn't about just a storm coming, these flying boats are not made to motor around for any extended period of time and definitely could not handle the swells this area sees on a regular basis. What are they supposed to do....take off and land in between each swell? Because I guarantee the first swell that was at least the height of the wings would sink a flying boat as it would crash on top of the wing and pull the flying boat to a watery grave. The reason REAL boats can handle it is because they have no wings protruding to be caught by a wave or swell. They simply roll with the swell or turn into it. good luck doing that on a flying boat.

The idea is a bad one and will not happen.


so what you saying is that the entire southern indian ocean is a raging torrent day and night without a single instant of calmness?

which is totally ridiculous.

you are saying a seaplane cannot fly above the ocean just like a plane and when it spots debris it cannot land on the water to examine that debris because the entire ocean is a raging cataclysmic storm 24/7 and the pilot is blind and cannot see a flat calm ocean and will willy nilly into a raging 50 foot wave which appears instantly without warning.

i don't believe you.

its more likely you are just jealous of the idea and you feel compelled to tear it down for that reason because you did not think it yourself so you have to come up with spurious excuses.

how do you explain live pictures on tv reports showing a flat calm ocean surface with nary a gigantic humongous wave in sight?

Even the presenters hair did not move.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 



IT’S a terrible place. And when winter comes – like it has now – the southern Indian Ocean has been described as the worst place in the world.

Unstable weather, dangerous conditions, high waves and wild seas all make for a terrifying scene, even for large ships. For rescue personnel trying to get to the bottom of MH370’s mystery, its a nightmare.

An Antarctic cold front hitting warm tropical air 2,500km off Australia’s west coast is expected to severely affect the search over the coming weeks and months.

An aviation meteorologist and an air and sea consultant have both predicted rough times for the planes and ships in the Indian Ocean, and an “on and off” mission at best as the area’s eight-month-long winter brings brutal swells and high winds to the search area.

www.thestar.com.my...< br />
The Southern Indian Ocean is one of the worst places in the world for high waves, and higher winds. Especially this time of year. No pilot in their right mind would even dream of trying to land on it this time of year.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 05:36 PM
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Destinyone

Vasa Croe

civpop
It is on cnn now just seen this, its on cnn I report

Cnn I report link




About time....but that is still just the I report for CNN, not really being blasted out there for anyone to look at.


I just saw who reported this...YAY!!!

It's the ireport I submitted 2 days ago. Yep, I'm binksmom..


Now, to see if it's picked up by other news outlets. It does say it's not vetted yet by CNN.

ireport.cnn.com... s%29

Des


edit on 27-3-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)


Credit where credit due... Shouldn't you have given a proper reference to earling42's OP for that I Report?


earthling42
This object is to small to be a sea mine, would it be related to the mystery of MH370? my guess is yes.
This object really looks like a fire extinguisher from a plane, Cargo area.
aae-ltd.com...
dc725.4shared.com... - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...


from your submission:



In the photo of the object at the link. It looks exactly like a fire extinguisher from a Boeing 777.
dc725.4shared.com...
www.haveeru.com.mv...


bad form in my opinion.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 05:40 PM
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I've worked around Halon before (yes it is still being used by the oil industry). I was told that while Halon wouldn't kill you if you were caught in a "dump" -- you'd probably be in the hospital for a few days recovering.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by seaez
 


If you'd care to write to Springer to confirm I told him I did give the link to THIS thread on ATS in my report to CNN, and told him I gave credit to ATS for the original story and link. I also told him, CNN only used a *portion* of all the info I submitted on the ireport, and only used 2 of the pics I submitted.

Please don't call me names, when you don't know what went on behind the scenes. I checked to see if I was violating any ATS T&C.s.

I also told Springer I had submitted all the same info to Fox News, and hopefully they would give credit to ATS.

If you have a problem with how I report information. Please, make your own CNN ireport account and do it yourself.

Des


edit on 27-3-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 05:52 PM
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Destinyone
reply to post by seaez
 


If you'd care to write to Springer to confirm I told him I did give the link to THIS thread on ATS in my report to CNN, and told him I gave credit to ATS for the original story and link. I also told him, CNN only used a *portion* of all the info I submitted on the ireport, and only used 2 of the pics I submitted.

Please don't call me names, when you don't know what went on behind the scenes. I checked to see if I was violating any ATS T&C.s.

I also told Springer I had submitted all the same info to Fox News, and hopefully they would give credit to ATS.

If you have a problem with how I report information. Please, make your own CNN ireport account and do it yourself.

Des


edit on 27-3-2014 by Destinyone because: (no reason given)


I didn't call you any name whatsoever... I stated my opinion of the post and iReport, bad form. Perhaps you can mention sources more conversationally next time and they won't strip them.

Or, perhaps there's a bigger conspiracy afoot: CNN not giving proper attribution...

edit on 22America/ChicagopmAmerica/Chicago85 by seaez because: actual post



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by Destinyone
 





posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 06:32 PM
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There was an article posted about the senior pilots son who broke the silence.
He sayd that all the stories that the MSM came up with are blatantly fals.
He knows for sure his father is not responsible for the missing aircraft.

It is staggering to see how the media drags the reputation of the senior pilot through the dirt in my opinion.
The thing i wonder about is what kind of malfunction would cause a plane to climb, in other words, perform uncommanded moves.
There is one known story about Malaysia airlines flight 124 which did that because of a ADIRU fault.
But can there be other reasons like a faulty IRS?



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by earthling42
 


The climb may have been done by the pilots, prior to them being overcome. If there is a fire, one way to fight it is to decompress the aircraft, and get up where there is less oxygen to snuff it out.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 06:44 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


But flying at fl450 would affect the pilots and the passengers too won't it?
Would a pilot take that risk?

Let's assume it was uncommanded, and because of this strong climb with the nose up the plane stalled and fell to a lower altitude, in this case to 23.000ft as mentioned.

I'm not very formilliar with aircrafts, but i think they really should look at other possibilities first before they accuse someone of mass murder



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 06:48 PM
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reply to post by earthling42
 


They didn't reach 45,000. It's physically impossible at that point in the flight, and the radar that said they did has something like a 15,000 foot error potential at the range they were from the antenna.

If there was a slow leak related to the problem they were fighting, they may have thought things were ok, and didn't recognize it until it was too late.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by championoftruth
 


My friend - it's clear that you have no understanding of the changeable nature and the sheer force of the open ocean. Especially the area being searched. The famed 'Roaring 40's.'

A seaplane is all well and good, but it could be happily sat on calm seas and then, within minutes, a serious swell brews up and it plummets into a trough. All the pilot would see would be a tower of water all around him and next thing - crash. One sunken seaplane.

There was a comment in one of your previous posts that made me chuckle - you comment that yachts and sailboats can go in this area. Yes - you are correct - that's because they are boats and designed differently to seaplanes - we work the waves in an intelligent manner, based on the type of boat you're sailing.

I'd love to head off down in that area on a yacht - it would be such a challenge. Then again, my two real ambitions in life would be to race in the Vendee Globe and do the Sydney - Hobart. Alas, I'm not a hot enough sailor for the former and my wife won't let me do the latter - says it's too dangerous.

Anyway, I suppose what I'm saying is that please - if you don't understand the ocean and its volatility and unpredictability, please don't comment upon it in a way that demonstrates ignorance of it's power.

It's like another world out there. A wonderful, awe-inspiring, terrifying, spiritual wilderness.

I don't mean any offence - if I could, I'd love to take you on a transatlantic rally and introduce to you mother nature.

Cado
edit on 27-3-2014 by cado angelus because: Pinot Noir



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 09:33 PM
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cado angelus
reply to post by championoftruth
 


My friend - it's clear that you have no understanding of the changeable nature and the sheer force of the open ocean. Especially the area being searched. The famed 'Roaring 40's.'

A seaplane is all well and good, but it could be happily sat on calm seas and then, within minutes, a serious swell brews up and it plummets into a trough. All the pilot would see would be a tower of water all around him and next thing - crash. One sunken seaplane.


Why'd you not just put those two sentences together earlier to end all that rabbiting.

edit on 27-3-2014 by smurfy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


The halon system is only in the cargo hold. It would have had to leak up into the passenger compartment somehow, in a big enough cloud that it filled the compartment if it was going to kill everyone on board.


Zap let me tell you a little story about first hand Halon experience that almost cost me my life 25+ years ago.

I had a small handheld can of Halon that I bought for my sports car that I had at the time, it was no bigger than hairspray bottle, so I would wager maybe 8 ounces.

I kept it in my Z28 rear cargo space/storage area, in a small tool kit. One day I was getting on it and shifting from 3 to 4th when I heard a loud bang, I thought I dropped my trans, but then the car instantly filled with this mysterious translucent white vapor. Nothing was visible outside the car. I had no idea where to steer the car, or wtf to do. I was in panic mode, then it got worse.

I couldn't breath all of a sudden, it was like someone had sucked all the air out of my lungs, and kicked me in the nuts at the same time. I couldn't find the window switches to roll the windows down, most likely due to panic and at that point I swerved to the right, and slammed on my brakes.

At the last second, before I lost consciousness I managed to open my driver side door and the Halon exited the vehicle and I stuck my head out the door.

Lucky for me I had conscientious drivers behind me that saw I was in trouble and stopped to help.

Later I found a small ruptured can, due to heat stress from the summer.

Halon can be great if a fire happens, but it sure can cause problems in small areas.

Peace,

RT
edit on 27-3-2014 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



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