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16 fruit & veg that you can grow from scraps

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posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 04:54 PM
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www.thegreencycler.com...

www.thekitchn.com...


I had to share this with Ats.

I have been growing brown onions, garlic, spring onions, from scraps, so yes it will work.

I came across the article about four months ago and thought I would have to try it out before opening my mouth on Ats.

So for any wanna be green thumbs out there, check it out, this is my first time ever growing anything.

In addition to the above mentioned, I also have six tomato plants, 11 chilli plants growing.

As we are approaching our winter, I will be looking at winter plants, eg: carrots, potatoes etc:

Just on a side note, I went to the supermarket on Sunday, Tomatoes were $8.15 a kg, so I thought blow that, I will have to wait a couple more weeks for my crop to ripen.

It would be great to be able to grow steaks in the back yard
edit on 23-3-2014 by keenasbro because: To add link




posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 04:56 PM
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You can also use science to broaden what you can grow.

Cloning and root propagating gell can allow you to "clone " a wide verity of plants.



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 

That sounds a bit more advanced than chopping the end of an onion and popping it in the ground.


I will look it up though for future reference, I'm still in infant school as far as growing plants goes so for now I'll stick to spuds.



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:07 PM
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keenasbro
reply to post by benrl
 

That sounds a bit more advanced than chopping the end of an onion and popping it in the ground.


I will look it up though for future reference, I'm still in infant school as far as growing plants goes so for now I'll stick to spuds.


Its pretty awesome.

Got a Rose bush you like?

Clone it.



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by keenasbro
 


Ahh, spring is here and my fingers are itching to dig in some soil. In my experience I've gotten about 10 pounds yield for every 1 pound of potatoes planted. Of course, your mileage may vary depending upon soil and variety.

Good luck!



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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FatherStacks
reply to post by keenasbro
 


Ahh, spring is here and my fingers are itching to dig in some soil. In my experience I've gotten about 10 pounds yield for every 1 pound of potatoes planted. Of course, your mileage may vary depending upon soil and variety.

Good luck!


Im experimenting this year with Hydro veggies, got the parts for my green house spread around the yard, just waiting for a clear day to assemble.

Love this time of year.



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by FatherStacks
 

As I said this is my first time ever and I find the whole growing thing so rewarding, I do wish I had started years ago, there is something special about getting your hands dirty in the garden. Cheers to you.



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:20 PM
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benrl

Got a Rose bush you like?

Clone it.


Fruit tree grafting is another cool technique. My grandparents had an old apple tree with three or four varieties of apples growing on it. Granddad had taken limbs from other apple trees he was fond of and spliced them onto the one in the back yard- created a bit of a "franken-tree."



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 

benrl, hydro sounds interesting, I will have to go searching the net for tips on how to do this.
Love it thanks.
edit on 23-3-2014 by keenasbro because: to add



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:36 PM
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benrl

keenasbro
reply to post by benrl
 

That sounds a bit more advanced than chopping the end of an onion and popping it in the ground.


I will look it up though for future reference, I'm still in infant school as far as growing plants goes so for now I'll stick to spuds.


Its pretty awesome.

Got a Rose bush you like?

Clone it.


Yep. You can also do grafting as well where you can graft on a different type of apple branch to an existing apple tree as well for variety and perhaps hybridization. Grafting works with grapes as well. It's a bit trickier than cloning but can be interesting to try doing. www.bhg.com...

The stuff benri is talking about is also called rooting hormone. It basically is a natural plant hormone that encourages root growth from the plant cells so it's not harmful at all.

Thanks for the fun reminder on this stuff. With spring break coming up this week, my daughter and I will be doing some of the kitchen scrap stuff for fun and maybe food later, lol, if the squirrels, raccoon and skunk don't eat it.



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by FatherStacks
 

There is a fruit tree out back which I'm sure is called a peecharine, (not even sure about the spelling) it has been crossed with peach and nectarine, they are ripe now and truly, they are so Moorish.

I didn't plant the tree, but am happy to reap the rewards.

One thing though, don't be to greedy, the after effects in the morning are quite dramatic. I have learnt my lesson.




posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 06:16 PM
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reply to post by keenasbro
 


I have about 15 pineapple plants out back which started from two. There is a trick to it though if you want them to bear fruit sooner than 6 years. Yup it used to take growers 6 years for pineapples to bare fruit when I was growing up it was real expensive.

If you take a small slice of apple and put it in the top shoot you can have bare fruit every 6 months. I learned that when I was down in Costa Rica from an echo farm tour.
edit on 23-3-2014 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 06:18 PM
link   

FatherStacks

benrl

Got a Rose bush you like?

Clone it.


Fruit tree grafting is another cool technique. My grandparents had an old apple tree with three or four varieties of apples growing on it. Granddad had taken limbs from other apple trees he was fond of and spliced them onto the one in the back yard- created a bit of a "franken-tree."



My grandfather did the same thing , he did it with grapes too ,we had acres of grapes . I remember one tree we had was two types of trees...there was one kind if bark about two feet tall then what looked like a big scar all the way around then a totally different type of tree it was pretty awesome the stuff he could do around the farm ...we never went hungry that's for sure .



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 06:18 PM
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reply to post by WhiteAlice
 


Something about gardening brings out the Mad scientist in me.

Makes me see how much tech I can throw at something to get optimal results while still maintaining a semblance of "natural"

Aeroponics, Hydro, Aqua, all GOOD examples of Man and nature working together.
edit on 23-3-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 10:25 PM
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I use potato peels to grow potatoes sometimes. I bring them into the woods and potato plants have been coming up all over the place for years now. They are real small potatoes though, I do not know if they could be made to grow big potatoes anymore, but all you have to do is dig them up and keep putting out the peels. The potatoes need to be peeled thick anyway sometimes, they are so crappy. I also plant garlic in planters from some old cloves that are dried out. The outside cats seem to eat those for some reason. I have some traveling onions, they reseed themselves and come up every year. A friend has a whole small hillside of garlic, it started from a few garlics he planted years ago.



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 10:34 PM
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reply to post by benrl
 


when i was a nipper these HUGE veg used to arrive at the end of the summer Tomatos /Apples etc etc

Turns out the old guy who was growing them never had a indoor toilet he was about 90 then guess where it was all going

but i used to take them to school and show my class mates this amazing veg

if only i knew then what i know now



posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by keenasbro
 


Good on you to post this. People need to remember what we already knew (well, some still know)...

I could swear I read that exact title before on Wakeup-world by the way. Can't find it though.

WUW is a good site for self sufficiency anyways... there is also alot of weird stuff on there, but its still an interesting site with a few good links every once in a while: Wake Up World



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 04:27 AM
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Very interesting read! it's amazing how much money you can save on vegies with a little time and thriftiness!

S+F!



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 07:31 AM
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WhiteAlice

benrl

keenasbro
reply to post by benrl
 

That sounds a bit more advanced than chopping the end of an onion and popping it in the ground.


I will look it up though for future reference, I'm still in infant school as far as growing plants goes so for now I'll stick to spuds.


Its pretty awesome.

Got a Rose bush you like?

Clone it.


Yep. You can also do grafting as well where you can graft on a different type of apple branch to an existing apple tree as well for variety and perhaps hybridization. Grafting works with grapes as well. It's a bit trickier than cloning but can be interesting to try doing. www.bhg.com...

The stuff benri is talking about is also called rooting hormone. It basically is a natural plant hormone that encourages root growth from the plant cells so it's not harmful at all.

Thanks for the fun reminder on this stuff. With spring break coming up this week, my daughter and I will be doing some of the kitchen scrap stuff for fun and maybe food later, lol, if the squirrels, raccoon and skunk don't eat it.

You can make your own rooting hormone by gathering about two cups of willow leaves and steeping them in hot water for a couple hours. When thats done just strain it and your done. very potent stuff, just dip the cut end of your clipping and put it in a pot or in the ground. Also you have to refridgerate it. It only lasts about a month or two.



posted on Mar, 24 2014 @ 07:36 AM
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rickymouse
I use potato peels to grow potatoes sometimes. I bring them into the woods and potato plants have been coming up all over the place for years now. They are real small potatoes though, I do not know if they could be made to grow big potatoes anymore, but all you have to do is dig them up and keep putting out the peels. The potatoes need to be peeled thick anyway sometimes, they are so crappy. I also plant garlic in planters from some old cloves that are dried out. The outside cats seem to eat those for some reason. I have some traveling onions, they reseed themselves and come up every year. A friend has a whole small hillside of garlic, it started from a few garlics he planted years ago.


If you try that in some very loose soil they will grow much larger. All root veggies need extremely loose soil to grow large. The resistance of clay soil can stop them.





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