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Communities Grow Weary of Militarized Police

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posted on Mar, 23 2014 @ 10:10 PM
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They cant just injure someone anymore because it leaves them open to penalty.

If they shoot they have to shoot to kill so theirs no witness or victim to hold them accountable.

Hows that for fed up?




posted on Mar, 25 2014 @ 01:46 AM
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reply to post by Snarl
 


Thanks for the reply. Some disturbing news I just got from a friend who's in the military just a few days ago. We were talking about cell phones and he flat out told me that he was told by some of his friends who are intel that they were told to be VERY CAREFUL about taking pictures using either digital phones or cameras. Apparently, when the pictures are taken, they contain GPS info which those in the know can access and discover the exact location of the picture's locale. I asked him why this wasn't common knowledge and he simply said "it's stuff you're not supposed to know". Take it or leave it. Has anyone heard this before who might have been in the military?



posted on Mar, 25 2014 @ 01:59 AM
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1FreeThinker
reply to post by Snarl
 

Thanks for the reply. Some disturbing news I just got from a friend who's in the military just a few days ago. We were talking about cell phones and he flat out told me that he was told by some of his friends who are intel that they were told to be VERY CAREFUL about taking pictures using either digital phones or cameras. Apparently, when the pictures are taken, they contain GPS info which those in the know can access and discover the exact location of the picture's locale. I asked him why this wasn't common knowledge and he simply said "it's stuff you're not supposed to know". Take it or leave it. Has anyone heard this before who might have been in the military?

It's been covered to some extent on this site IIRC. Intel weenies - LOL ... most paranoid people on the planet, and they can't be happy unless they're sharing it. Along those same lines ... the folks here who swear they had no clue the NSA could do that. Remember the movie ET? Who do they think that was portrayed in the van?



posted on Mar, 25 2014 @ 07:38 AM
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I thought this was about the police-not Washington politics.

By the way here it's called frontier justice. Popped another one Saturday night after a wild chase and that makes six so far this year. This was an obvious suicide by cop which they are more than happy to fulfill the request.

Texas and Florida are neck and neck with 12 each so far this year.

Alabama got 2 at one time that is called double bogie-3 at one time is called a cap trick.



posted on Mar, 25 2014 @ 10:36 AM
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reply to post by spooky24
 

We just had one in Sacramento. 22 Year old girl in grandma's car. Grandma reported it stolen but did not know her Granddaughter had taken it without permission. The car had bad tags or a registration issue and when the cops tried to pull her over she panicked and ran. A cop car tried to cut her off and got hit in the process, the 22 year old girl is now dead. Shot full of holes three doors from my girlfriends house....



posted on Mar, 25 2014 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by Snarl
 


Exactly.

Seems to work in the UK.

Our police do very well without being armed.

If armed response is needed we have a core of highly trained armed police on standby.



posted on Mar, 25 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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reply to post by Mamatus
 


Then you need the law changed. Here, once the chase enters a residential/business area the chase is stopped. Then the helicopter takes over and there is no way to run from it. A forced stop can only be made after the person has shown careless intentions to harm others-and that decision is made by supervisors-not the cars in the chase.

Automatically blame the police when your own stupid laws caused the death of the girl. Persons determined to commit suicide and take as many with them using an automobile is grounds for a forced stop-a young woman driving a stolen car would never be under no circumstances.

Blame your state legislature not the police.



posted on Mar, 27 2014 @ 12:25 AM
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crazyewok
reply to post by Snarl
 


Exactly.

Seems to work in the UK.

Our police do very well without being armed.

If armed response is needed we have a core of highly trained armed police on standby.


www.liveleak.com...

Can your cops do this?



posted on Apr, 3 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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crazyewok
reply to post by Snarl
 


Exactly.

Seems to work in the UK.

Our police do very well without being armed.

If armed response is needed we have a core of highly trained armed police on standby.


You know, until we can reduce their numbers with layoffs (or possibly military transfers), I would be temporarily mollified with a strictly unarmed civilian police department.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 12:27 AM
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reply to post by greencmp
 

You wouldn't have to worry very much about layoffs if police were disarmed. Most of 'em would probably quit for one of two reasons:
1. Just smart enough.
2. End of the power trip.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 12:35 AM
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reply to post by Snarl
 


My small hometown (pop. around 40-60 thousand) just got its very own urban war machine.

"The $266,000 grant, awarded by the Department of  Affairs and Public Safety, "

linky



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by GogoVicMorrow
 


What's up, Gogo? Sorry to hear about that. Did you get a look at the comments in your link?

Another positive note ... Just think, they're going to have to increase your taxes to pay for the maintenance of that beast.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 01:28 AM
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spooky24
I thought this was about the police-not Washington politics.

By the way here it's called frontier justice. Popped another one Saturday night after a wild chase and that makes six so far this year. This was an obvious suicide by cop which they are more than happy to fulfill the request.

Texas and Florida are neck and neck with 12 each so far this year.

Alabama got 2 at one time that is called double bogie-3 at one time is called a cap trick.


You have a few links to back up that tale?
Where was the chase? Who was the agency doing the chasing and killing?
You formerly claimed to live in same area I do so your tale should be documented by some media in the area.

How do you separate the police and Washington politics when the Washington politicians are influencing the police?



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 06:59 AM
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After a pursuit, five officers fired on Smith, 51, outside of an Elliston Place pizzeria after they said he threatened a detective, stole a car at gunpoint and led authorities on a chase through several neighborhoods during rush hour Friday. Smith was on parole and wanted on three warrants at the time, according to police and court records.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 12:29 PM
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Snarl
reply to post by greencmp
 

You wouldn't have to worry very much about layoffs if police were disarmed. Most of 'em would probably quit for one of two reasons:
1. Just smart enough.
2. End of the power trip.


I was in another thread and brought up a possible solution to this.

Just as in jury duty, a completely random and temporary assignment of civil police responsibilities could be an effective replacement for the professionalized quasi-military police that we have now.

While I would prefer a wholesale elimination of citizen facing domestic paramilitary forces, I'm open to discussion, whatever moves us back toward civility, independence and responsibility.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 04:02 PM
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spooky24



After a pursuit, five officers fired on Smith, 51, outside of an Elliston Place pizzeria after they said he threatened a detective, stole a car at gunpoint and led authorities on a chase through several neighborhoods during rush hour Friday. Smith was on parole and wanted on three warrants at the time, according to police and court records.


From your quote I found the link: www.tennessean.com...

From reading the story, it seems like the police did what was necessary to protect citizens in this case. How does that equate to police misbehavior?




The detective identified himself and asked to talk. When he grabbed Smith by the jacket, Smith pulled a pistol and pointed it at Hall's head before running off down the street, police said. Still armed and running from the detective, Smith used his gun to threaten a woman in a car on nearby South Street, forced her out, and tried to run over the detective, authorities said. Once inside the silver Buick Enclave, he drove "very erratically throughout Nashville," said police spokesman Don Aaron. But Smith didn't just steal a car — he also got the woman's cellphone, which she left behind. That allowed the vehicle to be tracked, police said. Police pursued Smith briefly, and a police helicopter followed him through southern, eastern and northern parts of the city before he arrived at Elliston Place at 6:17 p.m., an area bustling with restaurants, and soon with numerous officers. Smith left the car in a parking garage near the West End Chili's and tried to run before officers converged on him outside a strip mall near Elliston Place and 28th Avenue. Police said Smith had a gun pointed to his head and another pointed to his side, but then pointed one gun toward officers. The five officers who fired on Smith were: Officer Josh Reece, Det. Michael Gooch, Officer Shawn Rosson, Officer Clyde Stambaugh, and Officer Dustin Tidwell. Although the exterior glass of one business was cracked, Aaron said no one in the strip mall was hurt when officers fired.


Perhaps the newspaper didn't tell the story correctly?
Perhaps you didn't read the entire story?
This dude was not someone you'd want in your neighborhood from the description in the story.




Smith yelled, "I'm not going to jail, and you're not going to arrest me," slammed on the gas, spun out on the wet asphalt, and sped off, police said. Citing wet conditions, traffic, and substantial evidence in hand as to Smith's identity, police did not chase him that morning. In Williamson County, Smith was wanted in a March 10 vehicle burglary. Smith's prior convictions include six robberies in Davidson County, eight auto burglaries, felony evading of police, ten counts of felony forgery in Williamson County, identity theft and tampering with evidence.


So, what were the police supposed to do differently in this case?
According to the story, he had a gun in each hand....

This story in this thread is as nutty as you thinking the US Attorney's Office is prosecuting traffic tickets in another thread so I'm inclined to think your comprehension skills are sadly lacking.



posted on Apr, 4 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


One solution that needs to be implemented immediately is that cops need to start being held personally liable for financial damages instead of the taxpayers continually picking up the tab for lawsuits against these corrupt jackasses.

There will come a turning point at some time in the future. People will get tired of the constant threats posed to them by cops and nasty confrontations will spin up very frequently. Innocent lives will be lost and piles of dead cops will litter the streets.

No one should shed a tear when a cop dies.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 06:52 AM
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reply to post by greencmp
 


I was in another thread and brought up a possible solution to this.

Please post a link. I quickly scanned without seeing it ... you've quite a few posts under your belt.


Just as in jury duty, a completely random and temporary assignment of civil police responsibilities could be an effective replacement for the professionalized quasi-military police that we have now.

I like this, but a true understanding of law is rare indeed. If fact, law has become so complex, it virtually requires a specialization of LEO authorities. A seasoned LEO knows who the bad guys are, It'd be nice to give them one night of Purge ... on their honor of course.


While I would prefer a wholesale elimination of citizen facing domestic paramilitary forces, I'm open to discussion, whatever moves us back toward civility, independence and responsibility.

I welcome this discussion as well. Solving the issue on ATS won't do us a fat lot of good ... but I'm willing to try. What would you say needs to be the first step? Redefining "family" seems a logical first for me. I am truly curious what others would demand.



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 10:29 AM
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Snarl
reply to post by greencmp
 


I was in another thread and brought up a possible solution to this.

Please post a link. I quickly scanned without seeing it ... you've quite a few posts under your belt.


Just as in jury duty, a completely random and temporary assignment of civil police responsibilities could be an effective replacement for the professionalized quasi-military police that we have now.

I like this, but a true understanding of law is rare indeed. If fact, law has become so complex, it virtually requires a specialization of LEO authorities. A seasoned LEO knows who the bad guys are, It'd be nice to give them one night of Purge ... on their honor of course.


While I would prefer a wholesale elimination of citizen facing domestic paramilitary forces, I'm open to discussion, whatever moves us back toward civility, independence and responsibility.

I welcome this discussion as well. Solving the issue on ATS won't do us a fat lot of good ... but I'm willing to try. What would you say needs to be the first step? Redefining "family" seems a logical first for me. I am truly curious what others would demand.


It was from a discussion about the release of the names from the Zimmerman jury trial.

Names of Six Jurors Who Acquitted Zimmerman Made Public



Yes, jury duty is called "duty" for a reason. The lynch mob media bears a lot of responsibility for sure but, in the end it is up to us to stand by our decisions and principals.

Perhaps police "duty" modeled on the same premise of random selection and limited tenure could be a way for us to retrieve our society from the horrors of the police state.


I think that the law as it stands is superfluously vast and beyond individual comprehension even to most lawyers, much less a seasoned professional LEO.

The legal solution is twofold, a moratorium on new laws and a dramatic reduction of existing legislation.

The practical solution, admittedly oversimplified for the purposes of this discussion, would be for lack of a better analogy, citizen 'hall monitors' with barely any legal authority at all. The mere fact that the cycle of service will eventually pass through every person's (and therefore their special interest's) hands, will temper the will to misuse what little power they may exert. Extensive private surveillance (and even public surveillance) will actually become a feature and a desirable transparency tool. As citizen's themselves, they will have the right to carry a concealed weapon but, it needn't be required.

We don't want to redefine any social contracts, in fact, all legislation having to do with private non-criminal behavior (social laws) must be purged.
edit on 5-4-2014 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to post by greencmp
 

There has been a time or two I have advocated for a reduction/simplification of legislation. There are many fancy words applied in law/governance and that certainly opens too much to interpretation. The PPACA serves as a stellar example. What I wish everyone would be presented with, are the origins of the verbiage contained in this law. Were this perspective brought to light, both political parties would be shamed. I have no doubt our elected officials had nothing to do with drafting this legislation. It is such a daunting read, I highly doubt any one elected official has actually turned through each page of it ... ever.

Thank you for quoting your text from the jury thread. I wish people would see assignment to membership on a jury as a responsibility and an honor. Back when Civics was graduation criteria, I was taught Jury Duty afforded one a unique opportunity to sit in the highest seat of government ... that decisions reached by a jury could override those of the COTUS, SCOTUS, and POTUS. Oh how TPTB want that hidden now from common knowledge!!

Did you see what the authorities were recently doing to kids on Spring Break in Florida? Locking up miscreants in kennels until they sobered up enough to be released on their own recognizance? Lesson learned ... case closed ... pay your fine ... GTFOOH!! Of course, the horrors some experienced won't see the light of day, but the victims learned their lessons too. So ... I'm quite curious to see more of your mindset on the elimination of Social Laws ... and how we prevent parents/family from taking matters of honor into their own hands when their blood relatives have been wronged.



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