I think smoking cessation methods are there to keep you smoking

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posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 09:57 AM
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I quit smoking many times in the past, using just about every method under the sun - nicotine patches, nicotine gum, hypnosis, acupuncture, cutting down, e-cigs to get used to no-smoke smoking... Some of the stuff worked, but never for a very long time.

I still had cravings, even long after the actual nicotine withdrawal was done, and at some point I always had my "OK, I"m over it, now I can have ONE cigarette" re-entry moment.

The only time quitting really worked was the last, in August of last year, where I just quit cold turkey three weeks after my best friend (same age) died of aggressive lung cancer. It was the easiest thing I've ever done, and my husband, who just quit recently, says the same.

I've realized what makes quitting so hard: the ANTICIPATION. That feeling of absolute dread at the thought of the pain and suffering you'll have to go through to become a real, honest-to-God non-smoker. A mountain of apprehension at the thought that you will have to deny yourself this pleasure for the rest of your life.

The reality: It's freakin' easy. You wake up. You don't smoke. Repeat. That's all there is to it. All you need is motivation.

When my husband quit, I told him not to make a huge thing out of it -- don't pick a special day (like your birthday, the first of the month, your anniversary, the day when you finish the last carton of cigarettes, etc.), and don't count the days that you've been a non-smoker.

Just don't smoke. I had ONE moment of strong cravings on Day 3, and luckily my husband, who was then still smoking, refused to give me a cigarette. (The craving was not strong enough for me to get in the car and drive to the store for cigarettes.) That was it. Ever since I haven't had the urge to smoke even once, and the same goes for hubby.

When he quit, he said he felt downright pathetic that he hadn't done it sooner, seeing how easy it was.

So here's my theory: It seems cold turkey quitting is the easy thing to do - but the manufacturers of all those smoking cessation aids make it look like it's really hard. Same goes for doctors and public-health facilities offering smoking cessation classes and support groups... which basically are only there to constantly remind you that...

a) you used to smoke and you're in constant danger of relapsing
b) cigarettes exist (e.g., since I quit cold turkey, I haven't been thinking of cigarettes at all)
c) quitting smoking is so hard that you need a support group similar to a drug rehab group

Could it be that government, public health agencies, Big Pharma, and the tobacco industry are all in league with each other, promoting these smoking cessation aids, classes, support groups, drugs (!)?

I once read that a study showed that anti-smoking commercials and ads only serve to make smokers crave cigarettes more... same goes for the warnings on the side of cigarette packs. Basically, any mention of cigarettes and smoking only serves to increase the cravings in smokers -- and, no doubt, people who try to quit.

I think without these smoking cessation "aids," people would all quit cold turkey and would be just fine. And don't tell me that they're great because they helped you quit smoking. What I'm saying is that you might have had an even easier time quitting if you HADN'T used these methods... and that they might be a clever ruse by the PTB to continuously keep smoking and cigarettes in your mind.




posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


They are there to take your money. Plain and simple.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


Funny, I've been thinking about this work weeks now.

I've tried everything, gum, lozenges, e-cigs, etc.

I know now what I came to realize this week, the only way I am going to quit is by quitting cold turkey.
its 22 years now of smoking. I really think I'm going to do it. It;s always an "inconvenient" time to quit though, huh?




ps: I know turkey is good for you, but for now on I'm only going to eat mine warm.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:12 AM
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Could it be that government, public health agencies, Big Pharma, and the tobacco industry are all in league with each other, promoting these smoking cessation aids, classes, support groups, drugs (!)?


No,

At least not in the UK, I spent quite a lot of time studding health promotion in the UK with a focus on Smoking cessation and public health with in adolescent males. I spent time going through the white papers on the topic, looking at the theory behind it, and so on.

I can categorically tell you that the government and public health agencies do not want you to keep smoking.

Sure they get a load of tax money out of smokers but then they also have to pay lots of that back into the system to pay for all the treatment they require. In fact when you really start to get into the effects of smoking its quite staggering, not just from a health perspective but also when you look at the social impact. The exact impact in economical terms is very difficult to establish we can work estimates for how much they cost the NHS but they dont tend to look at the social welfare it costs.

Besides the government did not "Make" you start smoking, they have been taking some really drastic action to reduce the number of people smoking in the last decade and beyond.

If you want to stop smoking you can, you just dont give in to the urge its all about will power.

And your lack of will power is not evidence of some grand government big pharma conspiracy.
edit on 21-3-2014 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)
edit on 21-3-2014 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:14 AM
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I agree with almost all of that.
But i required something to help me quit, i got absolutely vicious after the first day without anything so i went to the doc and got what is called Champix (Chantix), Yeah pharmaceuticals etc, I didnt get many of the side effects and i did quit (and didnt get insanely snappy during that time either).

I think the ones that give you nicotine (patch, gum, etc), just extend your withdrawal symptoms. I tried the patch once before and it was THE WORST time ever.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:14 AM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


My only friend who quit smoking did it cold turkey and said that after a couple of days he never looked back. He did it for health reasons after a doctor's warning (well, it only took him a year after the warning to do it) but cold-turkey seems like the best (and cheapest) method.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:18 AM
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The longest time I was able to quit, was by going cold turkey. I made it 6 months, but that was back when you could still smoke in a bar, and I actually still went to them, so that didn't work out so well.

It's been on my mind for the last 2 months, to try again. Especially with a $1000.00 bonus promised from work

Two things though.
Did you get ornery?
How did you handle the oral fixation? Last time I always had raw veggies to munch on.

And this may be too personal, but did you notice a certain "drive" come back, or become stronger? Nobody ever talks about that, but it seems to happen when you quit.


btw, CONGRATULATIONS!!!!!!!!!


edit on 21-3-2014 by chiefsmom because: addition



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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I don't know that they want you to keep smoking. I'm sure that at the core of it the real want is to get people to quit the habit and found ways to try to help...some for real and some for profit. But people are different, different biologically and psychologically and situationally, with different triggers and motivations for both smoking and quitting.

What works for some doesn't work for others.

Quitting cold turkey is fine for some but near impossible for others. Just because some are able to do it doesn't make cold turkey the best way for everyone or make the person who is able to quit cold turkey any better or worse than one who isn't able to. Just makes them different.

ETA: Congrats on quitting and sorry about your friend.
edit on 3/21/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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chiefsmom

And this may be too personal, but did you notice a certain "drive" come back, or become stronger? Nobody ever talks about that, but it seems to happen when you quit.



Just gunna answer because it applies

Absolutely! When i quit i got this drive, it might be different for others. I've been really heavy into Math, science and cosmology/astronomy) and just space in general. Learning c++ as well, learned the basics of Java and have an entire game design course to go through (at my own speed, at home thing in my free time).

Been watching Through the Wormhole and really excited about the remake of COSMOS. I always had an interest in these things but no drive to actually learn them.
edit on 21/3/14 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


I quit smoking on my third try. I did it in the winter time when going out to smoke sucked anyway. The first 2 times I quit smoking for about a month, and then started back. The third time the cravings just weren't there as much. This is going from 2 packs a day to 0.. I think there is something to quitting multiple times actually. Another thing that helped me was smoking too much and drinking too much and having horrific hangovers, with a mix of that sick feeling you get from smoking too hard too fast. I mean it was super easy the third time, not even comparable. Also my gf didn't like me smoking which added to the choice.

I havn't smoked in about 2 or 3 years. Not sure. Recently at my new job everyone smokes and I smoked a cig (which was hard, I don't have smoker lungs anymore). It didn't cause any extra cravings. That was 2 weeks ago. So I guess I can smoke whenever I like now, but then again why would I buy a pack? I wouldn't. I'd rather smoke other things anyway.


With alcohol I have cut way down just by pretend quitting a couple of times. Went from drinking about 12 beers a night and up to 24. to now I drink about 4 a day and sometimes more but sometimes none. It's just not something I think about. setting a goal of quitting is counterproductive to me because it feels like a punishment. Instead I just drink less or more whenever and over time I have gotten down to where I am at. DO NOT quit drinking cold turkey I learned the hard way and could have ended up in the hospital. My heart rate was through the roof and I couldn't slow it down neither could I stop shaking or hallucinating. I drank more and was fine again.

What always helps me is having a full time job that requires lots of energy and a quick mind. Then I get home and I'm too tired to want to go out and buy anything. The exercise built into the job helps get your mind feeling good without any outside chemical help as well.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by AzureSky
 


LOL, well, I'm very happy you became more focused, and had that drive. That is great!

But to be honest, I was referring to, um, having to do with sexual drive.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:37 AM
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Good for you! I've quit smoking flat numerous times, but I'm always lead back to it. For the past few years, I smoke maybe two or three cigs a day, and that's fine by me; I figure that if it helps relieve stress, and I keep my intake moderate, then what the hell? I'd rather hold a small habit and be happier, than deny myself and be crappy.

Anyhow, I've always wondered about the mega cash-cow of smoking-cessation aids. Few people I've talked to mentioned that the side effects of Chantix were awful, so I never tried that route. You're right tho, and I agree that a bit of will-power and just pushing your way through withdrawals, is one of the morst pshychologically rewarding endeavors. You go!

xox
-kissy



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:39 AM
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chiefsmom
reply to post by AzureSky
 


LOL, well, I'm very happy you became more focused, and had that drive. That is great!

But to be honest, I was referring to, um, having to do with sexual drive.


Yes that happened to me. Mainly with alcohol though. I think it's the fact that your dopamine levels were being controlled with your habit, so living life for sex and other things was less important. Sex is just not as good if you are already satisfied. Why do all that work haha...

It seems to be a pattern. Do more drugs care less about doing other things in life. Do lots of things in life and care less about drugs.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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chiefsmom
reply to post by AzureSky
 


LOL, well, I'm very happy you became more focused, and had that drive. That is great!

But to be honest, I was referring to, um, having to do with sexual drive.


Hear that? Thats the sound of my palm hitting my face! haha
Its hard to get subtle hints like that through text

General increase in sex drive yes, but i never really had a problem while i smoked either. Can breathe easier so for those "endurance trials" your lungs can keep up with the rest of your body
edit on 21/3/14 by AzureSky because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 11:33 AM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


I quit smoking early in this past December. I ran out of rolling tobacco and rolling papers the night before and vowed NOT to replace them. But, I did invest in a vapor pen. It saved my life over the Christmas holidays and various get togethers, I'll tell you that! Now, I hardly even remember to "vape", or that I own a pen!

Yesterday, I had a spectacular victory of a life time! I didn't have my pen with me, and for some stupid reason, decided to reward myself with a cigarette. So, I bought a pack of my old brand, ripped open the pack and took a couple of luxurious puffs while stopped at a red light in the car, and was overcome with dizzyness! HAHA!

I managed to choke down the rest of the cigarette during the long drive home. When I got home, I washed up and changed my cloths but I couldn't get the smell of cigarette "exhaust" out of my nose! Disgusted, and remembering why I hated cigarettes, and their dark smokey allure, I took the rest of the new pack, I had just bought, crumpled them up and flushed them down the toilet!

I did need my vape pen this morning though! LOL!

EDIT TO ADD: I do notice that a lot people that vape, like to display their ability to (not) "smoke" in public by flaunting large clouds of vapor about in public places as if this was 1950 and they have their old cigarette habits back. This appears, to me to be an affront to, and they appear to be rebelling against, the modern anti smoking social mores prevalent in today's collective minds.

I think that's a bad thing for people concerned about "vaping" rights.

edit on 21-3-2014 by windword because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 11:36 AM
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i don't think there is a conspiracy to keep you smoking by the smoking cessation companies. they have no need to do that. almost every x-smoker i know has the same tale. the fact that no matter how much time goes by they are always in danger of smoking again due to the cravings they always have. this includes one x-smoker who has been smoke free close to FIFTY YEARS now. she still has to fight the cravings that she gets every day. i have had friends finally give up and start smoking at even 5 to 10 years after quitting since they just can't cope with the cravings anymore. one person even tried to commit suicide after several years smoke free from the stress created by the constant cravings she suffered. another friend gained over 20lbs from the sunflower seeds he used as a crutch to try to stay smoke free, (total health food nut), finally gave up after 5 years and started smoking again and since he cut out the sunflower seeds lost the weight that had been driving him crazy, along with the cravings. seems that once you are hooked you are never free. and the more you quit the harder it is to quit the next time, (i know that one from myself as well as others). i fly long distance and go bonkers, don't get between me and a place i can smoke after landing, because i will run you over, along with every other smoker on the flight. at that point all i can really think of is getting a couple cigarettes in me, not to mention by that time my "fuse" is so short i can be set off rather easily.

if you want a smoking conspiracy try the one about companies adding extra nicotine to their products to "super hook" you. this has to be true since when i run out Canadian or American purchased smokes i suddenly need 1.5-2 cigarettes right after each other in my normal smoking pattern, where with my North American ones i need 1 cigarette. and if i haven't been able to cut down yet before i return to North America, i go right back to needing 1 cigarette once i buy smokes there. and if i have cut down i don't even "finish" one cigarette for awhile. except for right after i land anyway, as it seems then i have to build up my nicotine levels to normal. i have always found that to be "interesting" especially when the non North American smokes i normally purchase are the same brand and type of the US ones i smoke, (other brands, same effect).

if they really want to "get rid" of smoking, there is only one way to do it. that is to ban it completely, with a grandfather clause that those born before a certain date (ie currant legal smokers), can still smoke. probably would need to sell them at a pharmacy at that point, as a controlled substance. "smoking cessation" products are a scam since they know full well you will be hooked for life, especially with the prices they charge. i remember at the end of high school a friend purchased one, cost him a heck of a lot. it was a one use little computer thing that was supposed to stop your reliance by changing the times you smoked. it failed for him, then we took it apart and were able to reset it, so that about 6 of us tried it, none quit. but the stupid thing was teachers and bosses would not let us go for a smoke when it told us too, who knows maybe it would have worked if not for that, but i doubt it.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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I was a heavy smoker for over 20 years, tried quitting many times during that period too. It's a very difficult process, but I've found a couple of things that helped me to quit easily and stay off for almost 4 years now. I don't get any temptations at all either. I live in CO so access to the herb is easy as I use it for pain, nausea etc..... Enough on that.

I also found that vitamin C is great at breaking addictions as well, even alcohol, heroin and what not. I'm sure if anyone is interested, a search will point you in the right direction. Here is one link for a vitamin C spray.



Vitamin C Spray

One smoking cessation tactic you should try is ascorbic acid spray, which is simply powdered vitamin C mixed with water in a spray bottle. Research shows this technique can reduce the cravings of cigarettes and help reduce or eliminate the smoking habit.

All you need is a small spray/mister bottle, which can be found in most drug stores or purchased from pharmacists, filled with a water and powdered vitamin C solution. Regularly throughout the day, especially when cigarette cravings occur, patients will discharge a couple of squirts into their mouth and throat. Many of those I interviewed said it had helped them totally quit smoking or substantially reduce the number of cigarettes they smoked daily.


Read more: www.drdavidwilliams.com...[\quote]



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 11:59 AM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


It's an interesting observation about human nature generally, not just smoking.

Applies to many things.

The problem with professional help is it constantly focuses your mind on the thing you want to forget.

Like when I used to drink heavy and went to the odd AA meeting; I would get absolutely bladdered after each meeting, he he.

Stopped going to AA, stopped drinking...simples.

Back in the 80s I had problems with my nerves and suffered frequent panic attacks.

Seems incredible now but I got nothing from my quack, who just basically counselled me for half an hour. No drugs.

I recovered after a few awful months, and I've been fine ever since.

Nowadays you hear of people who've suffered for years with their nerves and keep several health professionals on their toes.

Stop taking the damn drugs!



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by sylvie
 


I forgot to focus on your title directly when I first posted. I think it's exactly the opposite. If the government wanted more people to die to lower the growth rate all they would need to do is get more people to smoke. Seeing as how smoking advertising doesn't come on TV and how Obama made a big deal of quitting and trying to get other people to quit I just don't see it. They must make much more money on non smokers...

An obvious next move would be to legalize something else, that would bring in even more taxes, but without the same social harm.

I listened to the Joe Rogan Podcast recently and he had Dr Carl Hart on all about Drug Addiction. I would recommend it. What he says made me realize certain things about how my own mind works and how I can better deal with my own addictive tendencies.

STAR at post above mine. Focusing on quitting is a bad idea in my book. Just sort of accidentally do it. You have to let the addiction walk away. It's not a battle to fight.
edit on 21-3-2014 by KnightLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 12:23 PM
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FinalCountdown
reply to post by sylvie
 


Funny, I've been thinking about this work weeks now.

I've tried everything, gum, lozenges, e-cigs, etc.

I know now what I came to realize this week, the only way I am going to quit is by quitting cold turkey.
its 22 years now of smoking. I really think I'm going to do it. It;s always an "inconvenient" time to quit though, huh?

ps: I know turkey is good for you, but for now on I'm only going to eat mine warm.


I smoked for 32 years and my husband for 41.





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