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HowTo:Stop a dog from chewing on a cut/sore on his foot. Need help. Thanks!

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posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by mysterioustranger
 


Yes I have a white Sheppard who turns out has allergies. So his paws will inflame from time to time..
Gave Benydril ( antihistamine ). Till it goes away.
My dog is 80 lbs.. so vet said 2 benydril 2 times a day.




posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:12 PM
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Cone. Of. Shame.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:13 PM
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Bigburgh

Devilishwork
Hi. When my dog had a similar problem I put this liquid called "TCP" on the wound area. It's a strong smelling and not great tasting antiseptic. You can gargle with it if you have a sore throat and it helps make it better and you can use it for cuts and such.

Anyway I asked my friend who works as a vet and she said to just water it down a little and dab it round the area. The smell is pretty strong for humans so for dogs it's a lot stronger plus as I said it's got a nasty taste to it. My dog never touched her leg after that.

It might not work as well for you but that's what I used so thought I'd let you know.



Isn't TCP a cleaning chemical?
Would that not be highly toxic and kill the pet?


You had me worried that others would use a toxin, but the TCP suggested is an antiseptic in England and elsewhere, and actually has a Wikipedia page:

en.wikipedia.org...(antiseptic) First listing under the second section, "Medicine and Drugs"

People should not, of course, use a cleaning chemical on their dogs. Thanks for pointing that out.
edit on 20-3-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:19 PM
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reply to post by fenian8
 


Some data I found says that Savalon is toxic to cats, so I assume the same goes for dogs. Lots of contradictory information on some of these substances. But maybe it wasn't the exact same product you used.

For the cone of shame people, nah, this wolfdog would not accept that and would toss its head all over, knocking everything off whatever everything was sitting on. It would be like a cyclone, except inside the house.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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reply to post by Mamatus
 


You are very lucky to have such a pal, and he's lucky to have you. True friends, and lots of land to roam in. Congrats.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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reply to post by tigertatzen
 


Very good advice, and thanks for the education about dog saliva. It tends to lick the other dog if it gets a cut, so I guess the tales about wolf saliva may not be true but they do either try or like the taste of whatever is on the skin. Super glue may be one answer, I'll see how this progresses and will make a couple of calls as well. Thanks!



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:32 PM
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Aleister

Bigburgh

Devilishwork
Hi. When my dog had a similar problem I put this liquid called "TCP" on the wound area. It's a strong smelling and not great tasting antiseptic. You can gargle with it if you have a sore throat and it helps make it better and you can use it for cuts and such.

Anyway I asked my friend who works as a vet and she said to just water it down a little and dab it round the area. The smell is pretty strong for humans so for dogs it's a lot stronger plus as I said it's got a nasty taste to it. My dog never touched her leg after that.

It might not work as well for you but that's what I used so thought I'd let you know.



Isn't TCP a cleaning chemical?
Would that not be highly toxic and kill the pet?


You had me worried that others would use a toxin, but the TCP suggested is an antiseptic in England and elsewhere, and actually has a Wikipedia page:

en.wikipedia.org...(antiseptic) First listing under the second section, "Medicine and Drugs"

People should not, of course, use a cleaning chemical on their dogs. Thanks for pointing that out.
edit on 20-3-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



Oh thank god..I started looking it up out of fear... so far I could only find tcp in regards to computers


Note note: Kipper my white Sheppard with a little wolf is the most active loving dog I have is 10...and still a puppy per say.
Milo..my amalgaMUT is 10 and laaaaaaazeeee..part Boston and pit bull. Again very loving..and food driven..
And my new addition......Murphy.. pure Weimaraner born December 28th....all legs and ears...
edit on 20-3-2014 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)


P.S. THANKS FOR CLEARING THAT UP. I GOT IT CONFUSED WITH "TSP". HOLY CRAP!
edit on 20-3-2014 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 10:44 PM
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Clean the wound, and then put aloe vera on it.Wrap his foot/cut with medical tape and duct tape and change it out every five days. If he continually bites himself he may have a mental disorder then your up crap creek.
edit on 20-3-2014 by texasyeti because: more info



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 12:31 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 



It tends to lick the other dog if it gets a cut, so I guess the tales about wolf saliva may not be true but they do either try or like the taste of whatever is on the skin.


Yes, my daddy had a wolf once...her name was Dixie
and he said they would lick their wounds constantly to avoid other animals being able to smell their blood...instinctive defense mechanism, very fascinating. And I would venture to say that wolves' mouths are probably markedly cleaner than other canines when they're in the wild simply due to the purity of their diet. But I don't know that it would translate over into a domestic hybrid. Anything is possible.

And unfortunately I found out about the saliva thing the hard way...sustained multiple bites from two dogs who were attempting to maul my cat last year and ended up with a staph infection and on antibiotics for two months. The ER doc disabused me of the notion that dog saliva is clean while she was debriding my wounds with a scrub brush (after numerous injections of lidocaine into my hand and fingers, and one in the cuticle of my right thumb, yeah baby) because the infection was spreading. This was about two hours after the bites occurred...in other words scary fast.



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 05:35 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


TCP is regarded as a safe anti-bac disinfectant for humans. It's not overly strong and is used fairly frequently here. It is used more in medical applications, rather than a cleaner. Some use it as an additive in baths (elderly, mostly), most apply it directly to open wounds. I'm not sure of the safety in it's use in regards to dogs and it can be quite painful for a short time. If you've ever put Iodine on a wound, you'll have a good idea how it feels. I personally wouldn't use it on a dog just for that reason. I know OP said hoods were not an option, but the cone would be what I'd go for. Dogs are pretty good at healing themselves via saliva, but IME, they're fairly good at aggravating their wounds too. I'd avoid TCP, it's not very pleasant for the recipient and smells absolutely vile. It's blatantly obvious when someone has bathed in this stuff. It lingers for hours on end and I give them a wide berth.






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