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Fireball #2 Over Maritime Canada

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posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 11:41 AM
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For the second day in a row, a large fireball has been seen in the sky over Nova Scotia. CBC News reporter Phonse Jessome saw the colourful fireball in the northwestern sky above Fall River, 25 km north of Halifax, at 5:17 a.m. AT Wednesday. He said he saw it make a long, slow entry before breaking up into three or four pieces as it reached the horizon.


Full Article

Even the radio station announcer in Port Hawkesbury , Cape Breton claimed to have seen it at 5:17am.
Looks like something is breaking up and flying in over the east coast. Meteors? Space junk?



Jen Greene of Halifax said she driving to Stanfield International Airport with her boyfriend when she saw orange ball of fire at 5:15 a.m. while passing Miller Lake on Highway 102. "It looked liked like a really large Roman candle going across the sky," she said.Then it fizzled out, just a like a Roman candle does with little bits of flame coming out of it."

The fireball was orange, while the flames were red, Greene said. The trail of flames was about twice the size of the ball.

"It was just enough to tell that there were different pieces of flame coming off it."

Other people on social media, in various parts of the province, also reported seeing a bright streak in the sky at about the same time


Chronicle Herald
edit on 19-3-2014 by AccessDenied because: to add another source




posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by AccessDenied
 


Tis my home but I only find out about these things on ATS?

Guess I'll have to wake up earlier tomorrow to watch the skies. I did watch last night but to no avail.

Peace



edit on 19-3-2014 by jude11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 11:50 AM
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This is what I get for sleeping in till after 6am. Gonna try to get my lazy butt out of bed by 5am and just out of curiosity see if I can see anything! I have seen meteor showers before but many are saying this light is much bigger and more spectacular.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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jude11
reply to post by AccessDenied
 


Tis my area but I only find out about these things on ATS?

Guess I'll have to wake up earlier tomorrow to watch the skies. I did watch last night but to no avail.

Peace

I know right? Gotta get up before the birds to see anything.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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AccessDenied

jude11
reply to post by AccessDenied
 


Tis my area but I only find out about these things on ATS?

Guess I'll have to wake up earlier tomorrow to watch the skies. I did watch last night but to no avail.

Peace

I know right? Gotta get up before the birds to see anything.


Especially since I'm only 15 minutes away. Why can't these things happen at a more decent hour....like noon?


Damn!



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by jude11
 


From what I read,yesterday it was seen from Digby,to Sydney. Today from Hali to the island. I seriously need to get up earlier...



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 12:55 PM
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Perhaps mystery solved?
This guy makes it sound like an everyday common thing, and yet..you don't see it everyday.
Hmmm.

The fireball was a bolide, according to science expert Richard Zurawski. He said a bolide is a piece of rock or metal falling from space that glows when it burns up in the atmosphere, and its kinetic energy is transferred to heat and light. “It’s a pretty typical thing. Seeing it over the Maritimes is a little unusual, but this happens thousand of times probably every 24 hours,” said Zurawski, a meteorologist with Rogers News 95.7 radio in Halifax. Tuesday morning’s bolide came from a southerly direction headed north, he said, and they can last up to five or six seconds with a long, bright tail depending on how big the chunk of space debris was.


Truro Daily Article


“It goes from 20 to 40 kilometres a second,” Zurawski said, and are usually the size of a human head or larger. Some people have found pieces of bolides that reach the ground, which are then known as meteorites, he said. Although many of these fall to earth every day, Zurawski said it’s unusual for people to spot one because there’s so much unpopulated space in the Arctic tundra, ocean or desert where they could land. “It’s rare on one hand, and on the other hand it’s sort of a common thing.” Zurawski said a lot of the fascination people have with meteors or unusual phenomenon is because we’re “divorced from nature in so many ways” and don’t always pay attention to what’s happening in the sky.

“When something does happen we start saying ‘Oh, gee, that’s interesting’ … and it’s not Star Trek,” said Zurawski.


Well, I wasn't being chicken little and claiming the sky was falling...but like anything else in nature like tornadoes, waterspouts, rainbows etc. It's just a cool thing to see.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 01:28 PM
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It's still too bloody cold to be sitting outside watching for fireballs at night. July is a better time of year for that.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 03:25 PM
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My understanding is that the term "bolide" really requires some type of explosion in the atmosphere, as separation from a typical "meteor"... but I'm reading that it is loosely defined, and a lot of the time astronomers use "bolide" to describe any meteor that's bright and sustained...

The Difference between Asteroids, Bolides, Meteors, and Metorites

Personally, I find the word "bolide" to be way scarier than "meteor."

(Never saw a "Bolide shower" thank God)

And given the "complete" definition of a bolide (one which explodes perceptibly in the atmosphere) one could argue that those are nowhere near as "commonplace" as your everyday meteor... I love the dance between "Reporting it as WOW," but then "taking the WOW back because it happens all the time..." Every story... Every time.




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