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Liquid 'waves' detected on Saturn's moon Titan

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posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 06:48 PM
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we should start extracting and refining minerals and elements we require from these places. asteroids, planets, moons.
no more endoatmospheric resources lost.




posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 07:20 PM
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Riffrafter
reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Cool!

One of my 3 favorite places in the solar system. They are in order - Titan, Europa & Phobos.

The moons of our solar system are incredibly interesting. We definitely should send probes to Europa & Titan. Yesterday.

But we ought to go to Phobos ourselves - right after Mars. Since it's so small, we could make it a day trip from Mars and finally see what's up with that monolith.

I would add Saturn's Moon Enceladus t that list (probably ahead of Europa).

Enceladus is believed to have a relatively warm water ocean beneath its surface of icy soil/dirty ice, and that ocean is known to be a salt-water ocean that contains organic compounds -- the building blocks of life. Researchers know this because the Cassini probe actually flew through on of Enceladus' geysers and "tasted" that water.

Many astrobiologists at NASA and other institutions feel the Enceladus may be an even more promising place to find life than Europa.



posted on Mar, 19 2014 @ 08:42 PM
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999zxcv
lovely ten thousand billion rotten eggs would not do the smell of methane on that planet justice


Methane is odorless. The smell of rotten eggs comes from hydrogen sulfide, and the familiar smell of gas from a gas cooker or gas pipelines is due to something they add to it so that gas leaks could be detected.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by Indigent
 


An object floats when it's mass is less than the mass of the liquid it displaces.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 01:16 AM
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Titan is my favorite place in the solar system. I really wish we could get a rover up there that could survive the extreme temperatures. I'd love to see up close images of those lakes and more images of what is probably some of the most alien terrain in our entire solar system.

Is there not enough oxygen in Titan's atmosphere for combustion? You'd think a meteor burning up in Titan's atmosphere would make the whole moon blow up like the Death Star.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 02:08 AM
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Soylent Green Is People
Researchers know this because the Cassini probe actually flew through on of Enceladus' geysers and "tasted" that water.


Really Soylent? That is serious if true, they have not even located water on Mars for sure yet. I had no idea that the Cassini Probe could fly that low.

Maybe it has somthing to do with the atmosphere, or lack there of my friend? ~$heopleNation



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 06:17 AM
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another proof that aliens dont need earth for anything in a materialistic sense.....

You can bet there are whole moons with gigantic gold reserves out there..
edit on 20-3-2014 by kauskau because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 06:46 AM
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What would the planetary frequency be that would determine its colour of shine.

Pointing out something I feel relevant.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 06:46 AM
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What would the planetary frequency be that would determine its colour of shine.

Pointing out something I feel relevant.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 07:47 AM
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SheopleNation

Soylent Green Is People
Researchers know this because the Cassini probe actually flew through on of Enceladus' geysers and "tasted" that water.


Really Soylent? That is serious if true, they have not even located water on Mars for sure yet. I had no idea that the Cassini Probe could fly that low.

Maybe it has somthing to do with the atmosphere, or lack there of my friend? ~$heopleNation

Enceladus has geysers near its south pole that spray water into space. This water is believed to come from an underground salt water ocean. Cassini has flown through these geysers on several of occasions, dipping as low as 74 km (46 miles) from Enceladus to perform a rudimentary analysis of that water.

A Fizzy Ocean on Enceladus

Is it Snowing Microbes on Enceladus?

But I don't want to go too far off topic here. This thread is about Titan -- which is another "top contender" for the potential of other life in the solar system.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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reply to post by Aleister
 


Yeah, surf's up? You missed the part about the -180c surface temperature.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 03:21 PM
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That are amazing pictures.. But Methane ? I mean you don't want to smell that moon right?
edit on 0b07America/ChicagoThu, 20 Mar 2014 15:22:07 -0500vAmerica/ChicagoThu, 20 Mar 2014 15:22:07 -05001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:24 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Talk about a major source of energy...just too bad it would come with a high price.

Oceans of liquid methane!! wow!

Talk about alien landscapes.....



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 09:28 PM
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SheopleNation

Soylent Green Is People
Researchers know this because the Cassini probe actually flew through on of Enceladus' geysers and "tasted" that water.


Really Soylent? That is serious if true, they have not even located water on Mars for sure yet. I had no idea that the Cassini Probe could fly that low.

Maybe it has somthing to do with the atmosphere, or lack there of my friend? ~$heopleNation


Actually, they have. Ice is in permanent shadows close to the poles. The question is whether there was enough to flow across the surface as in rivers or lakes, oceans. There seems to be adequate evidence of water erosion effects but...it is an alien planet and such features may have come about different ways. Alluvial fans on mars may not have been formed by water...but probably was.



posted on Mar, 20 2014 @ 10:02 PM
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bbracken677
Actually, they have. Ice is in permanent shadows close to the poles. The question is whether there was enough to flow across the surface as in rivers or lakes, oceans. There seems to be adequate evidence of water erosion effects but...it is an alien planet and such features may have come about different ways. Alluvial fans on mars may not have been formed by water...but probably was.


Gotcha, appreciate the response from both you and Soylent. Back to Titan though, I really enjoyed Cassini images from that Moon, which I wish was a planet. Titan has always interested me a lot. Can't get enough of it. I hope we can land a rover there some day. Can you imagine?
~$heopleNation



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 12:07 PM
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Awesome find there! I also would like to see a rover or drone or something sent there...but....With our current technology, wouldn't our vehicles just stop working with all that methane?

The reason I say this is because of a documentory I watched on the Bermuda Triangle and they were saying that methane in the a plane's air intake would make it stall/fall and could make entire ships sink to the bottom in a flash! Does not sound like good news for our machines.

Im not saying this is how it works for sure because I am no scientist, but if this is the case, it would make it harder with our current technology to explore this mysterious yet wonderful moon. Then again I am sure there are ways aroung this.

And as for Moon/star/planet I would love to explore....well because of the mysteries surrounding it from way back when...in ancient times, I would have to go with Sirius. offtopic a bit (sorry op) but a good read nonetheless imoLink




posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by SheopleNation
 


I would love to see a true to life color pic of the surface of Titan from Titan...such as a view including a methane ocean and whatever passes for a solid surface....

Would be a totally alien awesome landscape pic!!



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 07:26 PM
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okamitengu
we should start extracting and refining minerals and elements we require from these places. asteroids, planets, moons.
no more endoatmospheric resources lost.

How would we transport it back to Earth? No pipeline so it would require spacecraft that would cost billions to make the trip, not exactly a good return on the dollar!



posted on Mar, 21 2014 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 



Here is a picture with the sun reflecting off of the 'ocean':



posted on Mar, 22 2014 @ 01:16 PM
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bbracken677
reply to post by SheopleNation
 


I would love to see a true to life color pic of the surface of Titan from Titan...such as a view including a methane ocean and whatever passes for a solid surface....

Would be a totally alien awesome landscape pic!!


Here are images from the Huygens probe of the surface of Titan. Unfortunately, no lakes in these images.

This fist one is taken from the surface. The picture of Earth's Moon from Apollo is added to give an idea of scale. The atmosphere is very thick (much thicker than Earth's atmosphere), and it is mostly composed of nitrogen and hydrocarbons, which give it an orange haze that cast an orange glow over everything:



The next two pictures were taken from the Huygens probe as it descended. In the images below, each row is at a panorama of images taken different altitude as it descended to the surface. The first picture below are the individual images taken, and the send picture is a mosaic of those images tiled together:




Here are links to the full size/full resolution images:
www.lpl.arizona.edu...
www.lpl.arizona.edu...
www.lpl.arizona.edu...

Link to source for images, plus additional images



edit on 3/22/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



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