Slovaki Storm Friday November 19, 2004

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posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 09:47 PM
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157mph winds destroy a forest -- Slovakia, nestled in the former Czech Republic, still has not recovered from their recent war. Tanks still litter the countryside. Neither has the weather in Czecheslovakia returned to normal.

www.lonelyplanet.com...

Who would have expected this sleepy 2400+ft mountainside to be subjected to tornados? Yet, Slovakia has experienced tornados three times this year, in April, June and November 19th in 2004. This one, in the remote mountain area of Tatras National Park, merely had severe economic consequences and no severe loss of life or developed real estate.

www.ujszo.com

The forest in the High Tatras National Park mountain range has virtually disappeared after the windstorm that passed across Slovakia on Friday. The uprooted and broken trees amount to about three million cubic meters of wood. Damage to forest property is in billions of crowns. People say trees fell like dominoes.

“Now I can imagine what the country looks like after exploding an atomic bomb. It was horrible”, says Miroslav Skvarek from the Children Anti-tuberculosis Sanatorium in Dolny Smokovec. About 50 children were trapped in the hospital and waited hours for help.

The situation in Slovakia is an emergency, Agriculture Minister Zsolt Simon said at a news conference in Tatranska Lomnica on Saturday. According to preliminary estimates from the TANAP state forestry company, the damaged coniferous forest amounts to about 2.5 million cubic meters of softwood which represents 90 percent of the annual extraction in this category of wood in Slovakia. Because of this, the minister with immediate effect ordered a halt to all planned softwood extraction activity throughout Slovakia. "This emergency situation requires these extraordinary measures," he said. At the same time, he with immediate effect issued a ban for citizens to enter forests with the exception of people employed to do forestry work.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




Related News Links:
www.einnews.com
www.shmu.sk

[edit on 24-11-2004 by Emily_Cragg]



E_T

posted on Nov, 26 2004 @ 09:00 AM
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This isn't caused by tornado!
As you can see all trees have fallen to same direction.
And trace of tornado is thin, about kilometer at biggest.



posted on Nov, 26 2004 @ 01:50 PM
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Good find!!

I've seen pictures of something similar caused by microbursts or certain other types of weather fronts. You're right that it's not caused by a tornado, though, because the pattern is different.

I've got several papers to finish this weekend, but perhaps other interested folk could poke around and see if they can find more on these types of windstorms. I know there's data out there but I've forgotten what they're called.


E_T

posted on Nov, 26 2004 @ 02:21 PM
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Here's from 1999 storm which affected big part of western Europe.
www.efi.fi...
www.unece.org...


The death toll of Lothar and Martin was over 150 victims of which nearly 90 were in France.
Structural damage was wide-spread over Europe...
Transport in some of these countries was disrupted for several days.
In France 2.5 million households were without electricity and after a week, half a million households still had no electricity.
...
The total cost of damage caused by the two storms is difficult to calculate but it will certainly exceed 6 billion Euros.
www.zamg.ac.at...

I can try to find some pics from it...
or then just took photo from one book I have.



posted on Nov, 26 2004 @ 02:21 PM
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Straight-line winds are responsible for most thunderstorm wind damage.

Winds can reach 100 mph to 150 mph, or briefly equivalent to a Category 3 hurricane.

Wind-driven hail missiles can injure or kill, and damage property.

One type of straight-line wind, the downburst, can cause damage equivalent to a strong tornado and can be extremely dangerous to aviation.

In 1998, thunderstorm winds were responsible for one death and 59 injuries in Wisconsin. Maximum wind gusts ranged from 80 to 128 mph!

explanation of 1 cause of these type of straight line winds in US
www.usatoday.com...

A few examples of what these winds can do to structures
www.stormhunter.net...

A "squall line" refers to a linearly-oriented zone of convection (i.e., thunderstorms). Squall lines are common across the United States east of the Rockies, especially during the spring when the atmosphere is most "dynamic." A "bow echo" or "bowing line segment" is an arched/bowed out line of thunderstorms, sometimes embedded within a squall line. Bow echoes, most common in the spring and summer, usually are associated with an axis of enhanced winds that create straight-line wind damage at the surface. In fact, bow echo-induced winds/downbursts account for a large majority of the structural damage resulting from convective non-tornadic winds. Transient tornadoes also can occur in squall lines, especially in association with bow echoes. These tornadoes, however, tend to be weaker and shorter-lived on average than those associated with supercell thunderstorms. Severe squall lines and bow echoes are quite common in the Ohio Valley, including Kentucky.
For more on Squall Line Winds visit
www.crh.noaa.gov...

For the definition of Bow Echoes and some other terms associated with these kind of wind storms vist here
www.sema.state.mo.us...


This site has the most amazing pics of the frontal weather cells and super cells bringing with them straight line gusting winds, these pictures really are of breathtaking quality to. I had to share hehehe

www.chaseday.com...

[edit on 26-11-2004 by radiant_obsidian]

[edit on 26-11-2004 by radiant_obsidian]

[edit on 26-11-2004 by radiant_obsidian]

[edit on 26-11-2004 by radiant_obsidian]

[edit on 26-11-2004 by radiant_obsidian]

[edit on 26-11-2004 by radiant_obsidian]





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