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incredible readings from MAS MH370

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posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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Cathcart
At the risk of sounding like a kook...

All those acrobatics, the incredible altitute shift, the weird zigzag pattern...am I the only one who's starting to think of UFOs?


Swallowed by a mothership. Then the mothership started doing acrobatics.




posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:20 PM
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If true then the 777 might be a better aircraft then what is it said to be.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:26 PM
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The article you linked to as 'proof' states that they're a "major defense contractor", which they're not.
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Although "major" is a bit presumptuous...they have done extensive work for the Chinese defence establishment...and have been honored by the Chinese for whatever work they did for them...twice.




They don't manufacture cutting edge electronic weaponry.


How could you know this??

Besides, they don't have to develop cutting edge weaponry....there are many other things that they could be developing that have significant applications for the military....such as electronic vehicle camouflage systems....sensors...RF devices...ect. All within the scope of their expertise. These 20 scientists just all happen to be RF specialists BTW.




If you're waiting for me to be filled with awe about them, don't, I design with this stuff every day.


I'm not waiting for anything....I suspected as much...you have that ring of "I know it all" written all over your posts. The thinly veiled sarcasm gives you away.




The ranking is based on patents.





It's great to be recognized by Thomson Reuters as one of the Top 100 global innovators, which identifies the most innovative organizations in the world through a series of patent-based metrics including overall innovation (patent) activity, success rate, globalization and influence.


The important thing to take away from this is that the company has been recognized as one of the top 100 innovators in the world. Patents are the life blood of any company engaged in product research and development...but I'm sure as a designer of some sort...you are well aware of this. Therefore...patent success rate, overall patent innovation and global influence are a fair basis for ranking companies like this.

I'm not suggesting that these scientists developed a cloaking device which hid the plane...I am merely pointing out their presence on the plane....and offering another potential reason the aircraft might have been highjacked.

But as with anything to do with this flight....all we have is speculation.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:31 PM
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That is one magic loogie.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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Seems this wasn't the only weird activity by a plane that night. This is from the big thread. There was another plane (or something) that looked odd around the same time.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

and

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:37 PM
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deadcalm

Although "major" is a bit presumptuous...they have done extensive work for the Chinese defence establishment...and have been honored by the Chinese for whatever work they did for them...twice.


Got any reference to what they were being honored for? It would be interesting to see. We've been honored by a number of government agencies, SORDAC and NASA among them, but it was for the sorts of things that surprised me. The projects you get attaboys on always seem to be on toss-off projects. Go figure.





How could you know this??


They don't make that sort of part. But hey, how do you know they DO? Any proof at all? I'd even accept strong circumstantial proof, like they hired a group of known ECM experts.



Besides, they don't have to develop cutting edge weaponry....there are many other things that they could be developing that have significant applications for the military....such as electronic vehicle camouflage systems....sensors...RF devices...ect. All within the scope of their expertise. These 20 scientists just all happen to be RF specialists BTW.


Yes, they make jellybean commodity parts, and we in the MIC use them in designs. So in a way, that's significant. However, they're not parts you couldn't get from someone else. You look in a catalog for something that'll do the job, and then you see what they cost. If it's cheap and does the job, you try it out. Thus Freescale. I happen to be an RF specialist BTW. Radar. Funny old world, innit?






I'm not waiting for anything....I suspected as much...you have that ring of "I know it all" written all over your posts. The thinly veiled sarcasm gives you away.


That's the ring of "I actually do this stuff" written all over my posts. It gives you a different viewpoint, I'd suppose.



The important thing to take away from this is that the company has been recognized as one of the top 100 innovators in the world. Patents are the life blood of any company engaged in product research and development...


And in 2008, they were just about bankrupt. See above post. You will have no problems finding similar articles, BTW.



I'm not suggesting that these scientists developed a cloaking device which hid the plane...I am merely pointing out their presence on the plane....and offering another potential reason the aircraft might have been highjacked.

But as with anything to do with this flight....all we have is speculation.



Ok. But the article you linked as supporting your viewpoint is one that's been recycled by all the "greats" like BIN, with mods. And they're incorrect. Now, if these guys had all been from LM or Boeing and worked in the appropriate spook section, it would be a valid supposition, but it's Freescale's fab guys. I'm sure they're competent, but nothing I've seen in these patents (especially that chip tiling patent...) would have been worth hijacking a plane over.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 09:24 PM
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The projects you get attaboys on always seem to be on toss-off projects. Go figure.
reply to post by Bedlam
 


To be expected really...all the cutting edge stuff is classified and highly compartmentalized...public recognition for the advancements in these types of programs are non-existant.




Any proof at all? I'd even accept strong circumstantial proof, like they hired a group of known ECM experts.


None at all in fact...as I stated...pure speculation on my part. I thought it was a logical place to start with the passengers as a potential reason for the planes disappearance. Look for any anomolies. 20 RF specialists qualifies as such as far as I'm concerned.

Bear in mind that though the US may not have need of their services....doesn't mean that there isn't someone out there that couldn't use the expertise of these 20 specialists. As a radar designer, or components designer...whatever you do....I'm sure you can appreciate the many and varied uses that RF has. Perhaps some other admirer of RF based technology saw a powerful enough need to snatch these folks..??




However, they're not parts you couldn't get from someone else.


I don't think thats what they were after at all....parts as you say, can be gotten elsewhere. I think it was their expertise that was required. For what? No idea. HAARP technology perhaps.





I happen to be an RF specialist BTW. Radar.


I'd imagine youir knowledge would be quite valuable to certain parties....no?




And in 2008, they were just about bankrupt.


So was almost every major bank in 2008...hell I took more than 100k hit in my investment portfolio. I feared bankruptcy myself...so thats hardly evidence of anything. Corporate restructuring happens all the time....so does bankruptcy. The fact that it's 2014 and they are still here should speak to their ability to innovate....and more importantly, their perceieved value in the market.




Ok. But the article you linked as supporting your viewpoint is one that's been recycled by all the "greats" like BIN, with mods. And they're incorrect.


My viewpoint, such as it is, has been explained to the best of my ability. I linked the article to show that the company has the expertise necessary to develop a great number of things...I suspect that whatever reason someone would want these guys....has nothing to do with their products per se....but rather the people's skills themselves...or knowledge that they hold that someone sees enough value in, to justify the effort they have went through to get them.

But hey....who really knows right? All we have is speculation with varrying degrees of probability.

Time will tell.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 10:37 PM
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Makes semis for cell phones, telecom, autos, and consumer products. Check!
reply to post by Bedlam
 



For your edification and amusement...I present the following;




Freescale was one of the first semiconductor companies in the world, having started as a division of Motorola in Phoenix, Arizona in 1948[2] and then becoming autonomous by the divestiture of the Semiconductor Products Sector of Motorola in 2004.


Followed by...




In the 1960s, one of the U. S. space program's goals was to land a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth. In 1968, NASA began manned Apollo flights that led to the first lunar landing in July 1969. Apollo 11 was particularly significant for hundreds of employees involved in designing, testing and producing its electronics. A division of Motorola, which became Freescale Semiconductor, supplied thousands of semiconductor devices, ground-based tracking and checkout equipment, and 12 on-board tracking and communications units. An "up-data link" in the Apollo's command module received signals from Earth to relay to other on-board systems. A transponder received and transmitted voice and television signals and scientific data.[3]



I've been reading a bit more about the company as well....found that second quote rather interesting.

This one too....




On 26 February 2013, Freescale Semiconductor announced the creation of the world’s smallest (by size) ARM-powered chip. The Kinetis KL02 measures 1.9 by 2 millimeters and is a full microcontroller unit (MCU), meaning the chip sports a processor, RAM, ROM, clock and I/O control unit. The chip competes with the Atmel M0+ offerings, which are the low-power leaders in the industry [18] One application that Freescale says the chips could be used for is swallowable computers.


Now at this point, I'm starting to think to myself....this company has had some rather impressive achievments...no? It would certainly seem so. It also speaks to the companies ties with the MIC as well.

The plot thickens....???




The 48-year-old Freescale chief executive had revived the chipmaker from near death after its spin-off from Motorola (MOT) a few years earlier, sending the company's stock price soaring. But on Feb. 21, Mayer stepped up to a makeshift podium inside the cafeteria at Freescale's Austin (Tex.) headquarters and delivered a dismal message to thousands of Freescale employees: "Welcome to the first town hall [meeting] of 2008, and what will be my last."


All the major companies...from Boeing to Lougheed Martin...have teetered on the brink of bankruptcy and have been poorly managed. This takes absolutely nothing away from the brilliance and achievments of it's technicians and engineers or the marvels they have created.

The fact that the company was poorly managed got me to thinking...why? Why would you save something that wasn't worth saving?

The answer of course is....you wouldn't.




Motorola announced that their semiconductor division would be divested on October 6, 2003 to create Freescale. Freescale completed its IPO on July 16, 2004.
On September 15, 2006, Freescale agreed to a $17.6 billion buyout by a consortium led by Blackstone Group and its co-investors, Carlyle Group, TPG Capital, and Permira.[20] The buyout offer was accepted on November 13, 2006 following a vote by company shareholders. The purchase, which closed on December 1, 2006, was the largest private buyout of a technology company until the Dell buyout of 2013 and is one of the ten largest buyouts of all time.[21]


Hmmm....one of the ten largest buyouts of all time. I want to draw your attention to the investors....theres some very interesting names there...the Carlyle Group not the least of those. If you don`t know who the Carlyle Group is I would suggest you read a bit....the major shareholders are an illustrious lot....GHW Bush, Tony Blair among them.




Saved from near death...yeah that's the king of super duper semis there...


Sarcasm...it never gets old.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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Cathcart
At the risk of sounding like a kook...

All those acrobatics, the incredible altitute shift, the weird zigzag pattern...am I the only one who's starting to think of UFOs?


It seems that the more we "learn", the more incredible this ordinary aircraft seemed to behave. If it were inside a UFO, undergoing some sort of shorting-out, would that account for the wild direction and height changes before all emissions went silent?



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 11:13 PM
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I know of a pilot with a simulator in his office better than this pilot. Even my flight simulator is likely on par or better.
It's NOT AT ALL unusual for a pilot, especially one with any ambition, to have a flight sim at home.

A standard 8 core amd or xeon with a couple industrial video cards and 3 to 6 monitors wouldn't run you a dime over $5,000.
WITH mediocre controls, software and a few flight / craft expansions.

$10,000 or less for the full meal deal, minus actual cockpit console.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 11:39 PM
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deadcalm



Makes semis for cell phones, telecom, autos, and consumer products. Check!
reply to post by Bedlam
 



For your edification and amusement...I present the following;




Freescale was one of the first semiconductor companies in the world, having started as a division of Motorola in Phoenix, Arizona in 1948[2] and then becoming autonomous by the divestiture of the Semiconductor Products Sector of Motorola in 2004.


Followed by...




In the 1960s, one of the U. S. space program's goals was to land a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth. In 1968, NASA began manned Apollo flights that led to the first lunar landing in July 1969. Apollo 11 was particularly significant for hundreds of employees involved in designing, testing and producing its electronics. A division of Motorola, which became Freescale Semiconductor, supplied thousands of semiconductor devices, ground-based tracking and checkout equipment, and 12 on-board tracking and communications units. An "up-data link" in the Apollo's command module received signals from Earth to relay to other on-board systems. A transponder received and transmitted voice and television signals and scientific data.[3]



I've been reading a bit more about the company as well....found that second quote rather interesting.

This one too....




On 26 February 2013, Freescale Semiconductor announced the creation of the world’s smallest (by size) ARM-powered chip. The Kinetis KL02 measures 1.9 by 2 millimeters and is a full microcontroller unit (MCU), meaning the chip sports a processor, RAM, ROM, clock and I/O control unit. The chip competes with the Atmel M0+ offerings, which are the low-power leaders in the industry [18] One application that Freescale says the chips could be used for is swallowable computers.


Now at this point, I'm starting to think to myself....this company has had some rather impressive achievments...no? It would certainly seem so. It also speaks to the companies ties with the MIC as well.

The plot thickens....???




The 48-year-old Freescale chief executive had revived the chipmaker from near death after its spin-off from Motorola (MOT) a few years earlier, sending the company's stock price soaring. But on Feb. 21, Mayer stepped up to a makeshift podium inside the cafeteria at Freescale's Austin (Tex.) headquarters and delivered a dismal message to thousands of Freescale employees: "Welcome to the first town hall [meeting] of 2008, and what will be my last."


All the major companies...from Boeing to Lougheed Martin...have teetered on the brink of bankruptcy and have been poorly managed. This takes absolutely nothing away from the brilliance and achievments of it's technicians and engineers or the marvels they have created.

The fact that the company was poorly managed got me to thinking...why? Why would you save something that wasn't worth saving?

The answer of course is....you wouldn't.




Motorola announced that their semiconductor division would be divested on October 6, 2003 to create Freescale. Freescale completed its IPO on July 16, 2004.
On September 15, 2006, Freescale agreed to a $17.6 billion buyout by a consortium led by Blackstone Group and its co-investors, Carlyle Group, TPG Capital, and Permira.[20] The buyout offer was accepted on November 13, 2006 following a vote by company shareholders. The purchase, which closed on December 1, 2006, was the largest private buyout of a technology company until the Dell buyout of 2013 and is one of the ten largest buyouts of all time.[21]


Hmmm....one of the ten largest buyouts of all time. I want to draw your attention to the investors....theres some very interesting names there...the Carlyle Group not the least of those. If you don`t know who the Carlyle Group is I would suggest you read a bit....the major shareholders are an illustrious lot....GHW Bush, Tony Blair among them.




Saved from near death...yeah that's the king of super duper semis there...


Sarcasm...it never gets old.






thanks for the great comments here. Don't let anyone derail or deride and keep up the good work! Like any good research, the more we find out, the more we realize we don't know - at least those of us without an agenda or an ego (undeservedly at that) bigger than the missing 777.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 01:00 AM
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reply to post by deadcalm
 


At work for the MIC... get back to you in the AM. BTW, that micro is a rock bottom unit used for very simple applications, I've used the Atmel and Microchip equivalents many times.

eta: it's sop to send groups of engineers like this.
edit on 18-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 02:24 AM
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F4guy

minusinfinity
reply to post by InverseLookingGlass
 


not sure if o2 masks would drop.

the plane is in N. Korea.

look there....
old redline speed

On every presurized transport category aircraft I have flown, the emergency O2 masks are deployed automatically when the cabin altitude hits or exceeds 14,000 feet.


Can a pilot disengage the circuit breaker for the cabin O2 system intentionally?

And the O2 doesn't last forever.

My hypothesis is psychosis of co-pilot. He locks out pilot when pilot goes out to piss, depressurizes and knocks everybody out, because the voices in his head tell him they are demons out to get him and everybody else. Then flies around doing what the voices in his head tell him to do, except they don't do fuel management very well.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 03:09 AM
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reply to post by mbkennel
 


At 45000 feet, I'm not sure the little supplemental masks the passengers have can get the job done...you need o2 under pressure over 40k.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 03:13 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 

Why bother if the idea was to incapacitate the cabin?
At 35,000 a gradual depressurization would get everyone sleepy until...nighty night.

I'm not convinced the radar data can be used to accurately determine altitude.


edit on 3/18/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 04:08 AM
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mbkennel

F4guy

minusinfinity
reply to post by InverseLookingGlass
 


not sure if o2 masks would drop.

the plane is in N. Korea.

look there....
old redline speed

On every presurized transport category aircraft I have flown, the emergency O2 masks are deployed automatically when the cabin altitude hits or exceeds 14,000 feet.


Can a pilot disengage the circuit breaker for the cabin O2 system intentionally?

And the O2 doesn't last forever.





There is a switch to drop the masks but no switch to keep them from dropping. And the O2 generators for the passengers are good for about 15 minutes. In any event, the puny little masks for the pax won't do you much good above about 25,000 feet cabin altitude. You need at least a pressure demand mask at 100% O2.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 04:16 AM
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Phage
reply to post by Bedlam
 



I'm not convinced the radar data can be used to accurately determine altitude.


edit on 3/18/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)


Primary ATC radar gives no altitude information. A Precision Approach Radar can, within limits, and something like the Aegis fire control radar obviously can. That is one of the big reasons for requiring Mode C (altitude encoded) transponders.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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Phage
reply to post by Bedlam
 

Why bother if the idea was to incapacitate the cabin?
At 35,000 a gradual depressurization would get everyone sleepy until...nighty night.


I'm agreeing with you - the comment was something about the masks coming out automatically and protecting the passengers - at the altitudes they were at, it wouldn't matter if they DID drop if the cabin depressurized.



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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deadcalm

For your edification and amusement...I present the following;

Freescale was one of the first semiconductor companies in the world, having started as a division of Motorola in Phoenix, Arizona in 1948[2] and then becoming autonomous by the divestiture of the Semiconductor Products Sector of Motorola in 2004.


Sure. Motorola had a lot of innovative products for their time. After they started going downhill, not so much. And now the remains of Motorola's semiconductor division is Freescale. It's not the same company as when it was Motorola in their heyday. Because now, they innovate parts mostly for MP3 players and washing machines.



Followed by...

In the 1960s...


I notice you haven't found a lot of those that say "In 2010..". Hell, Fairchild Semi was kickass in the 60s. Some of the first ICs. And the government thought they were so good they couldn't be allowed to go under for national security. I used many a Fairchild part myself. Now they make buck regulator ICs for LEDs.



I've been reading a bit more about the company as well....found that second quote rather interesting.


Why? Because when they were Motorola they made a part for NASA, half a century ago?



This one too....


On 26 February 2013, Freescale Semiconductor announced the creation of the world’s smallest (by size) ARM-powered chip. The Kinetis KL02 measures 1.9 by 2 millimeters and is a full microcontroller unit (MCU), meaning the chip sports a processor, RAM, ROM, clock and I/O control unit. The chip competes with the Atmel M0+ offerings, which are the low-power leaders in the industry [18] One application that Freescale says the chips could be used for is swallowable computers.


This impresses you? It's a bottom feeder micro for very targeted applications, like a blender control. It's slow, 8 bits, and has 32k of RAM. This is great for really simple applications because it's cheap. But it's not an "impressive achievement", it's the brains for a greeting card noisemaker.




Now at this point, I'm starting to think to myself....this company has had some rather impressive achievments...no? It would certainly seem so. It also speaks to the companies ties with the MIC as well.

The plot thickens....???


I think it only thickens if you don't do any design and haven't worked with this stuff. Looking for the 'MIC' aspect, don't see it, frankly. You can get a better part from Atmel, btw. And they'll give you the development system if you're an actual developer.

You could buy one of your impressive superparts from Digikey with your Visa. Oh, wait, here you go: buy your own KL02 development board! The MIC will let you have this one for $13, not including shipping. Tell them I sent you.



All the major companies...from Boeing to Lougheed Martin...have teetered on the brink of bankruptcy and have been poorly managed. This takes absolutely nothing away from the brilliance and achievments of it's technicians and engineers or the marvels they have created.


Yes, like the article you originally linked to pointed out - they made marvelous 2W RF MOSFETs. Even had a 100W one. And little micros, and some DSPs intended for music players. Wow. What this takes nothing away from is my statement that they're a commodity middle-ground semi company.



The fact that the company was poorly managed got me to thinking...why? Why would you save something that wasn't worth saving?


Go read the article I linked. They didn't get their money back for quite a while. There's nothing wrong with having a McDonald's. They make money for you. They're not Sardi's, though. And while the sous chef at Sardi's might be worth kidnapping for his secrets, the french fry man at the local Mickeys is not.
edit on 18-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)

edit on 18-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 18 2014 @ 11:27 PM
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Sure. Motorola had a lot of innovative products for their time.
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Unless something changed today....Motorola is sitting at 3rd largest manufacturers of RF related products in the WORLD. The company continues to innovate to this day. Listening to you, one would get the mistaken impression that Motorola is a has been company seconds from bankrupcy....which is not the case. They posted profits of over 2.4 billion last year...not bad for a company who`s heyday of innovation ended long ago.




Because now, they innovate parts mostly for MP3 players and washing machines.


Mostly...certainly not entirely as you will see below. However, I fail to see how this makes them a mickey mouse operation? How does it relate to our original conversation about the ability of it's designers and engineers? How does this relate to their skills or why someone would want them? Surely you're not suggesting that all these 20 men can do is design trinkets for MP3 players or washing machines?




I notice you haven't found a lot of those that say "In 2010.."


I did cite an example from Feb, 2013....not current enough for you? Hold the phone...it's coming below.




Why? Because when they were Motorola they made a part for NASA, half a century ago?


They made much more than a single part for NASA, which if you go back and look at my post...you will see for yourself. However....we aren't talking about Motorola per se....we are talking about an entirely different business unit...Freescale Semiconductor. Bear in mind that Motorola started Freescale in 1948.

The point of the quote was that it speaks to the companies history of innovation and technical expertise.




It's a bottom feeder micro for very targeted applications


As is most technology. However to suggest that this is merely "bottom feeder" technology is frankly ridiculous. The technology can be changed or redesigned to serve many other purposes beside that for which it was originally intended. Microtechnology of this type is anything but simple to design and engineer, not to mention manufacture....to be recognized as an industry leader in this field makes them anything but "bottom feeders".




It's slow, 8 bits, and has 32k of RAM.


They do make many other versions...that was just an example. Again....microtechnolgy of this type, whatever it's intended application, takes nothing away from what it is....which is the smallest chip of it's type in the WORLD. Made to compete with the industry leader in these products.




. Looking for the 'MIC' aspect, don't see it, frankly.


Then perhaps this will help...




Freescale Semiconductor (FSL), a global leader in radio frequency (RF) power transistors, today announced the availability of 11 new commercial RF power LDMOS products that can meet the requirements of U.S. defense electronics applications. This is the first set of products released as part of the company’s strategic defense initiatives for its RF power business, announced in June 2013.


and this....




Freescale now offers the level of support provided in other markets to U.S. defense systems customers, enabling them to optimize the performance of these RF devices for radar, military communications and electronic warfare applications.


Freescale Press Release incl. FINANCIALS

This article was just released today...is that current enough for ya? Obviously they have been doing product R&D for a number military applications, including radar....fancy that.

With your interest in the financial health of the company...I'm sure you will be glad to see the substancial increase in share price based on this news. Seems that they will live to see another year....they've been in business for 66 years already.




You could buy one of your impressive superparts from Digikey with your Visa. Oh, wait, here you go: buy your own KL02 development board! The MIC will let you have this one for $13, not including shipping. Tell them I sent you.


While I enjoy sarcasm as much as anyone...it's juvenile and beneath a man of your intelligence. Perhaps you think this is amusing....I assure you it is nothing but tedious.




They didn't get their money back for quite a while.


But they DID make their money back...what is it with you and this companies finances? They have been around since 1948....they must be doing something of value or they wouldn't exist.

Also...I noted that you made no mention at all about who it was that purchased Freescale...or the fact that it was the largest tech company buyout in history until the Dell Computer deal. It still ranks as one of the 10 largest buyout in HISTORY.

If you had also taken the time to look into the Carlyle group you would have quickly learned that the major shareholder is the Saudi Bin Laden Group....GHW Bush (former CIA director, POTUS), Tony Blair (former PM of England)....had you have done so....you would have seen the MIC connection through the investors. These investors all have extensive contacts in politics, MIC, and intelligence communities at the highest levels. One of the many military eq suppliers that the Carlyle Group owned was United Defence...builder of the Bradley. They were bought out by BAE Systems a few years ago.



edit on 18America/Chicagopm182014-03-18T23:53:42-05:00pmTuesday03 by deadcalm because: (no reason given)




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