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incredible readings from MAS MH370

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posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:01 PM
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According to cnn, data from radar and satellite indicates the plane climbed to 45,000' then in (under?) one minute dropped to 23,000'.

Aviation experts in an industrial boeing 777 simulator stated the aircraft wasn't designed for that altitude and that the speed of the drop should have started to tear it to pieces; beginning with the bay doors for landing gears and ripping off of the wings.

They say that even if it did survive such a maneuver, it would no longer be airworthy.

However, further data suggests that not only did it survive but even climbed again and at one point flew below 5,000' subjecting it to structural and engine stress even more and more intense fuel consumption.

Not only that, it followed a zigzag pattern and unbelievably was able to be airborne for 7 and a half hours.



Early leaks even said it was detected heading toward Pulau Perak island which slightly deviates from this path but this was later retracted.

The aviation experts said radar and visual detection could be avoided by flying low over mountains in the area around the Himalayas, conceivably.

After those aerial acrobatics in that giant aircraft?

Now that is some super skillful flying.

Authorities reportedly looking at flight engineer, plane altitude in missing Malaysia jetliner investigation

Authorities are also examining the possibility that the plane flew at an altitude of less than 5,000 feet to avoid radar coverage after it turned back from its planned route to Beijing, the Malaysian newspaper New Straits Times reports.

The newspaper said officials are reviewing the plane’s flight profile to determine whether it used “terrain masking” techniques during the time it disappeared from radar coverage.

"It's possible that the aircraft had hugged the terrain in some areas that are mountainous to avoid radar detection,” an official told the newspaper. “The person who had control over the aircraft has a solid knowledge of avionics and navigation…it passed low over Kelantan, that was true.”




posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:07 PM
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reply to post by reject
 


Nothing surprises me anymore with this case. Unbelievable for a conventional commercial airliner to perform these maneuvers, if true. Me thinks that the "why" and "how" will never be solved, but I think there will be some closure as somebody finds floating or washed-up debris.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by reject
 


I heard that the passengers would lose consciousness at 45k ft. Does anyone know if the oxygen masks would drop automatically? --or can that be disabled too?



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by UnBreakable
 


yup, highly unusual...



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by InverseLookingGlass
 


not sure if o2 masks would drop.


the plane is in N. Korea.

look there....



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by reject
 


I haven't understood what the FBI has to do with all this. Was any US federal crime broken? Enough already with all the amateurs getting involved with this. The only explanation would be, that the US is responsible in some way and want to get the 'evidence' before any one else does.

CNN has new theories every hour. They interview book authors, even a wall street journal author, just because they happen to have written an artical about the incident.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:30 PM
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reply to post by Hellas
 



The only explanation would be, that the US is responsible in some way and want to get the 'evidence' before any one else does.

CNN has new theories every hour. They interview book authors, even a wall street journal author, just because they happen to have written an artical about the incident.

Wait.
What??

If the US is responsible why haven't there been any announcements that it's at lat/lon xxxx

So - I've been an avid CNN newsreader for a few years now; otherwise my news comes from Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert. Forgive me for not following Fox or MSNBC or what-have-you (I do check in on bbc a few times a week).......

And incidentally, just because book/article authors go on to live talk shows does not mean they are evil or conspirators.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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InverseLookingGlass
reply to post by reject
 


I heard that the passengers would lose consciousness at 45k ft. Does anyone know if the oxygen masks would drop automatically? --or can that be disabled too?


My theory has been all along that they took the plane to 45K feet, depressurizd d the plane to kill the passengers quickly. At that height loss of consciousness happens in a few seconds, followed by death. Keeps them from fighting or making any calls.....happens quickly and most are likely asleep anyways being this was a late night flight. Even if the oxygen masks dropped they would not have time to do anything.

There is a wiki on how long unconsciousness takes at different altitudes....search for it and you can check the different times.

Passengers are all long dead is my thought.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 06:10 PM
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BuzzyWigs
reply to post by Hellas
 



The only explanation would be, that the US is responsible in some way and want to get the 'evidence' before any one else does.

CNN has new theories every hour. They interview book authors, even a wall street journal author, just because they happen to have written an artical about the incident.



And incidentally, just because book/article authors go on to live talk shows does not mean they are evil or conspirators.


No. It means they have no idea and feed the people with BS all day long



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 06:14 PM
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If they did climb to 45,000ft and depressurize the cabin to kill the passengers then I hope it landed safely somewhere and they find the animals that did this then hang then from the highest tree. That is just the nastiest thing one could ever think of doing to passengers of an aircraft whether sleeping or not!



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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Passengers are all long dead is my thought.
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


I thought that too....until I heard about this....




20 passengers on board the missing flight were world-class electronic Techs for a major Defense Contracting Company that specialize in such things as electronic weapons that “disappear” airplanes and ships from the battlefield. They were employed by Freescale Semiconducter which designs and manufactures cutting edge electronic weaponry for the Department of Defense. Such weaponry includes those making it possible to simply vanish planes off of radar…


Source


If you ask me...this is what it's all about. The passengers. Thats the key.

Someone knows exactly where this plane is...and the missing 20 scientists.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by deadcalm
 


That article has a few terms used properly...mostly "a" "an" and "the". After that it's total crap.

Freescale is not a major aerospace developer. They do not make devices that cause planes to vanish. The components listed as if this was proof are mid-line commodity parts of the sort you can buy from Mouser with a Visa. Yes, you use a lot of jellybean MOS parts in communications. That doesn't make them ominously wondrous...it's WHY we call them jellybeans.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:19 PM
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Freescale is not a major aerospace developer.
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Did someone claim it was?

Freescale SEMICONDUCTOR. That kinda gives away the fact that it isn't an aerospace developer. Here is a sample of the fields they ARE involved in....




Microcontrollers
Processors
Analog & Power Management
RF
Sensors





They do not make devices that cause planes to vanish. The components listed as if this was proof are mid-line commodity parts of the sort you can buy from Mouser with a Visa. Yes, you use a lot of jellybean MOS parts in communications. That doesn't make them ominously wondrous...it's WHY we call them jellybeans.


As much as I enjoy sarcasm....the company is a bit more than you make it out to be...





Freescale named a Top 100 Global Innovator
What does it take to have real innovation? It’s starts with a great idea – and Freescale has patented many thousands of them over its 60+ years of history and currently has more than 6,000 patent families. We're also incubating them in our Discovery Labs. It's great to be recognized by Thomson Reuters as one of the Top 100 global innovators, which identifies the most innovative organizations in the world through a series of patent-based metrics including overall innovation (patent) activity, success rate, globalization and influence.


Yeah...a mickey mouse operation to be sure.




They do not make devices that cause planes to vanish.


Why not? Secondly...how could you possible know that?

The technology already exists to render some things "invisible"....




Imagine making a tank invisible with a cloaking device that is capable of masking the vehicle’s infrared signature to enemy eyes, and the significant advantages this would hold on the battlefield.





With peacekeeping operations now often taking place in deserts, as well as forests and towns all in the same day, Adaptiv is capable of shielding large pieces of military equipment from detection by allowing vehicles to mimic the temperature of their surroundings to suit varying terrain. It can also make a tank look like other objects, such as a cow or a car, or bushes and rocks.


BAE Systems

So...the technology already exists. The company has the reputation and technical expertise to develop and build this technology.




After that it's total crap.


I think not.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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I believe the senior pilot on board knew the terrain he was going to fly through like the back of his hand and used it to shield the aircraft from radar detection.

This is more than likely why he had the flight simulator. He has "flown" this predetermined route several times from the comfort of his own home.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:36 PM
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IamAbeliever
I believe the senior pilot on board knew the terrain he was going to fly through like the back of his hand and used it to shield the aircraft from radar detection.

This is more than likely why he had the flight simulator. He has "flown" this predetermined route several times from the comfort of his own home.


That's a fair point. Why would you have a flight simulator at home? Last thing I'd want in my home is a simulator for my working life

Having said that, flying is just so spectacular I may rethink that stance...Hard to say but I like the logic here



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:42 PM
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minusinfinity
reply to post by InverseLookingGlass
 


not sure if o2 masks would drop.

the plane is in N. Korea.

look there....
old redline speed

On every presurized transport category aircraft I have flown, the emergency O2 masks are deployed automatically when the cabin altitude hits or exceeds 14,000 feet. At 45,000 feet, the 777 cabin would be at about 10,000. At 43,000 feet we can maintain an 8,000 foot cabin. And we practice emergency descents that can dump a lot of altitude in a very short time without overstressing the aircraft. Thrust to idle (pull the throttles all the way back); extend the speedbrakes; roll in 60-70 degrees bank and spiral down holding speed near but under MMO/VMO (redline). It would scare the hell out of the passengers but it's better than fatal hypoxia. If indicated airspeed is less than 200, you can drop the landing gear but it gets really noisy and beats up the gear doors.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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reply to post by reject
 


If a Boeing 707 can do this:



Then a Boeing 777 in this day and age could easily do the stuff descrbed, someone is sensationalising the article


I don't think I'd like to be aboard either way

edit on 17-3-2014 by Zcustosmorum because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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deadcalm

Did someone claim it was?


The article you linked to as 'proof' states that they're a "major defense contractor", which they're not. They don't manufacture cutting edge electronic weaponry.



20 passengers on board the missing flight were world-class electronic Techs for a major Defense Contracting Company that specialize in such things as electronic weapons that “disappear” airplanes and ships from the battlefield. They were employed by Freescale Semiconducter which designs and manufactures cutting edge electronic weaponry for the Department of Defense.





Freescale SEMICONDUCTOR. That kinda gives away the fact that it isn't an aerospace developer. Here is a sample of the fields they ARE involved in....


Sure. And they're pretty much all commodity products. That's ok, someone has to make that stuff. If you're waiting for me to be filled with awe about them, don't, I design with this stuff every day.




As much as I enjoy sarcasm....the company is a bit more than you make it out to be...

Freescale named a Top 100 Global Innovator


Yeah...a mickey mouse operation to be sure.


The ranking is based on patents. Not on whether they're a producer of cutting edge products. Freescale is a big company, there's a lot of money in jellybean parts. Freescale is the remains of Motorola, they got a big head start.




Why not? Secondly...how could you possible know that?


Would you expect McDonald's to? Freescale is the McDonald's of semiconductors. Oh, and you're asking for proof of a negative. Can you prove that Burger King isn't manufacturing magic cloaks? No? Ok then.

You have to prove they DO. And you know, they make semiconductors. Ones that aren't all that innovative, or exceptional.



The technology already exists to render some things "invisible"....


Perhaps you can point out how RF MOSFETS are useful for generating heat patterns to mask tanks. Other than the obvious, I suppose.



So...the technology already exists. The company has the reputation and technical expertise to develop and build this technology.


Ah, the sadness of searching for keywords on Google with no understanding of the technology. Now, if you had some way to demonstrate that the devices referenced in your article actually had any relationship to the technology you just posted. There isn't any, but that's the funny part.

Oh, maybe you could show how those parts can be made to cause some large object to "vanish" off of radar. Wait, can't do that either.









edit on 17-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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At the risk of sounding like a kook...

All those acrobatics, the incredible altitute shift, the weird zigzag pattern...am I the only one who's starting to think of UFOs?



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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The 48-year-old Freescale chief executive had revived the chipmaker from near death after its spin-off from Motorola (MOT) a few years earlier, sending the company's stock price soaring. But on Feb. 21, Mayer stepped up to a makeshift podium inside the cafeteria at Freescale's Austin (Tex.) headquarters and delivered a dismal message to thousands of Freescale employees: "Welcome to the first town hall [meeting] of 2008, and what will be my last."


Saved from near death...yeah that's the king of super duper semis there...




Freescale, which makes semiconductors for cell phones, telecom equipment, autos, and various consumer products, is shaping up to be one of the ugliest buyouts in history. Sales started slipping just months after the deal's close. Freescale's biggest customer, former parent Motorola, slashed orders, and Freescale wasn't able to add enough new customers to offset the shortfall. Revenues for 2007 tumbled 10%, to $5.7 billion, even as the industry's increased 5%. And the news keeps getting worse: On Mar. 26, Motorola announced it was spinning off its cell-phone unit, raising more concerns for Freescale.



Makes semis for cell phones, telecom, autos, and consumer products. Check!



"They're not on my short list of the cell-phone chipmakers that will survive," says Michael Thelander, CEO of Oakland (Calif.)-based wireless consultancy Signals Research Group.




Freescale has been in similar straits before. "When I joined the company, it had been given up for dead," says Mayer. "I had people coming to me and saying, What are you doing?'" Earlier in the decade, as part of Motorola, Freescale had few high-tech innovations in its pipeline and had piled up huge losses.


Linky to one of many similar articles...

It's easy to look at the "Our stuff is pretty" website and think they're the top of the heap. But they're sort of like Kobalt tools. Not exactly Snap-on, but ok when you need something cheap you can buy from Digikey fast.
edit on 17-3-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)





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