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Parents, Lawmakers Fear Cursive Becoming Lost Art

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posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 01:04 AM
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In this digital age of Internet acronyms, like "LOL," and emoticons, Tennessee is the latest state pressing for legislation that mandates students learn cursive writing in school.

Lawmakers in the state are pushing for passage of House Bill 1697, which would require all public school students to learn how to read and write in cursive, preferably by the third grade.

The bill, authored by state Republican Rep. Sheila Butt, is meant to prevent a decline in students' ability to read handwritten notes and sign their own names as well as interpret historical documents in their original form, like the Declaration of Independence



It seems there are some that are concerned that cursive script is no longer to be taught in many schools. I certainly agree that the Common Core curriculum is generally poorly conceived and overall a bad idea, but I believe that on this one point it has it right that we omit cursive as a core requirement.

While I can see value in cursive being offered as an elective, I don't see why this skill is needed in our digital age. They seem worried that our children won't be able to read our founding documents in their original form. Christian religious texts have been translated from their original languages and that poses a much greater risk of a translation error than copying documents written in English cursive to printed English.

I simply don't share the concern that these lawmakers have for teaching a dated skill like cursive anymore than it makes sense to teach Fortran to modern computer graduates. This seems to be more push for educational tradition than remedy for a true problem.

Source Article
edit on 2014/3/17 by Metallicus because: added source




posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 01:10 AM
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While I agree we no longer need to use it, I think the next generation's signatures will look funny without it.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 01:17 AM
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Pointless required lessons that need to be eliminated, yes. write in scribble basically for no real purpose.
Traditional, sure..but so is churning butter.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 01:42 AM
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SaturnFX
Pointless required lessons that need to be eliminated, yes. write in scribble basically for no real purpose.
Traditional, sure..but so is churning butter.


You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about... you obviously don't write in cursive.




Putting pen to paper stimulates the brain like nothing else, even in this age of e-mails, texts and tweets. In fact, learning to write in cursive is shown to improve brain development in the areas of thinking, language and working memory. Cursive handwriting stimulates brain synapses and synchronicity between the left and right hemispheres, something absent from printing and typing.

As a result, the physical act of writing in cursive leads to increased comprehension and participation. Interestingly, a few years ago, the College Board found that students who wrote in cursive for the essay portion of the SAT scored slightly higher than those who printed, which experts believe is because the speed and efficiency of writing in cursive allowed the students to focus on the content of their essays.


www.nytimes.com...

That's just the first article that popped up after a quick google search, there is plenty research and articles that back up claims of benefits from writing in cursive if you care to look yourself.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:05 AM
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I learned cursive in the 3rd grade (private school in Oregon) and can use it to this day. I'm sure anyone who can write in print could learn cursive fairly quickly and easily, even from a short online tutorial. All it took for me was writing out the upper and lower case alphabet in cursive and memorizing the letters, and I was 9.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:10 AM
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I see it being phased out already. My daughter learned (she's 16) but I know that they are not required to write their papers or use it in any other way since she learned it. I recall being required to turn in all homework, exams, essays, etc. in cursive...not so now. I imagine that those who came after my daughter may not have learned how to do it at all.

I suppose now they will have to change the definition of "Signature". We can all just start signing our checks and other documents with an "X" like they did before everyone learned how to read and write.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:10 AM
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reply to post by ghostfacekilah00
 


I am not saying it would be hard to learn I am saying we don't need to legislate it be taught.

I can read and write cursive, but I don't use it anymore. I also know a half dozen computer programming languages that won't help me get a job in today's job market.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:16 AM
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Kangaruex4Ewe
I suppose now they will have to change the definition of "Signature". We can all just start signing our checks and other documents with an "X" like they did before everyone learned how to read and write.


TPTB can use our inability to sign documents as an additional excuse to RFID chip everyone in a few years. Maybe this is all just part of the master plan!

edit on 2014/3/17 by Metallicus because: sp



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 02:28 AM
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Metallicus

Kangaruex4Ewe
I suppose now they will have to change the definition of "Signature". We can all just start signing our checks and other documents with an "X" like they did before everyone learned how to read and write.


TPTB can use our inability to sign documents as an additional excuse to RFID chip everyone in a few years. Maybe this is all just part of the master plan!

edit on 2014/3/17 by Metallicus because: sp


Ha! I'm glad you went there... I was about to, but decided against it.
I did actually consider the document signing issue. I am not sure how they will go about that. I have signed many documents that required print and signature both on them. I guess they will just stay with printing alone. It would be odd (IMO) to "sign" a check by printing your name. I would probably be long dead before I remembered to do it that way. Heck... it takes me 6 months into a new year to remember to write the right date!



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 03:45 AM
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retirednature

SaturnFX
Pointless required lessons that need to be eliminated, yes. write in scribble basically for no real purpose.
Traditional, sure..but so is churning butter.


You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about...

Pretty sure the topic is cursive handwriting...so yep, I have an idea


you obviously don't write in cursive.

Not daily, weekly, or even monthly (with the exception of signatures). More of a computer person..like pretty much everyone else.
Painting also stimulates the brain...and is more constructive than writing a language in a slightly different way than we print now., also students whom drink some caffine before an exam score higher on average than those who don't, and after lunch naps for an hour boosts learning capability.

cursive can be done away with and use that time to learn graphic art, photoshop, or just take a nap with better results.
check it out



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 04:56 AM
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Metallicus

In this digital age of Internet acronyms, like "LOL," and emoticons, Tennessee is the latest state pressing for legislation that mandates students learn cursive writing in school.

Lawmakers in the state are pushing for passage of House Bill 1697, which would require all public school students to learn how to read and write in cursive, preferably by the third grade.

The bill, authored by state Republican Rep. Sheila Butt, is meant to prevent a decline in students' ability to read handwritten notes and sign their own names as well as interpret historical documents in their original form, like the Declaration of Independence



It seems there are some that are concerned that cursive script is no longer to be taught in many schools. I certainly agree that the Common Core curriculum is generally poorly conceived and overall a bad idea, but I believe that on this one point it has it right that we omit cursive as a core requirement.

While I can see value in cursive being offered as an elective, I don't see why this skill is needed in our digital age. They seem worried that our children won't be able to read our founding documents in their original form. Christian religious texts have been translated from their original languages and that poses a much greater risk of a translation error than copying documents written in English cursive to printed English.

I simply don't share the concern that these lawmakers have for teaching a dated skill like cursive anymore than it makes sense to teach Fortran to modern computer graduates. This seems to be more push for educational tradition than remedy for a true problem.

Source Article
edit on 2014/3/17 by Metallicus because: added source


Absolutly cursive should be taught, and learned. I did in 2nd grade. I know highschool teachers did not like it because it was harder to read when grading papers since everyones cursive is a tad different. But it is one of those skills that even if never used should still be learned.
Firepiston
edit on 17-3-2014 by FirePiston because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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Metallicus

In this digital age of Internet acronyms, like "LOL," and emoticons, Tennessee is the latest state pressing for legislation that mandates students learn cursive writing in school.

Lawmakers in the state are pushing for passage of House Bill 1697, which would require all public school students to learn how to read and write in cursive, preferably by the third grade.

The bill, authored by state Republican Rep. Sheila Butt, is meant to prevent a decline in students' ability to read handwritten notes and sign their own names as well as interpret historical documents in their original form, like the Declaration of Independence



It seems there are some that are concerned that cursive script is no longer to be taught in many schools. I certainly agree that the Common Core curriculum is generally poorly conceived and overall a bad idea, but I believe that on this one point it has it right that we omit cursive as a core requirement.

While I can see value in cursive being offered as an elective, I don't see why this skill is needed in our digital age. They seem worried that our children won't be able to read our founding documents in their original form. Christian religious texts have been translated from their original languages and that poses a much greater risk of a translation error than copying documents written in English cursive to printed English.

I simply don't share the concern that these lawmakers have for teaching a dated skill like cursive anymore than it makes sense to teach Fortran to modern computer graduates. This seems to be more push for educational tradition than remedy for a true problem.

Source Article
edit on 2014/3/17 by Metallicus because: added source


Why would you not want to learn and know how to write our written language in other forms? Cursive is mandatory to know in my book. Not teaching it is just further dumbing down our society.
Firepiston
edit on 17-3-2014 by FirePiston because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by Metallicus
 


Why learn spelling, with auto-correct and grammar check?
Why learn math, with calculators?
Why learn to tell time with an analogue clock when everything is digital?
Why learn history when you can Google anything?
Why learn to tie shoes when there is Velcro?

Why learn?

Cursive may be a throwback to the far ancient past. In a time where dinosaurs ruled the earth and life still teemed on Mars, when the solar system was young, cursive had it's place.

I suppose there can be an argument made for getting rid of cursive in our schools, there is probably an app for translation now.

Cogito ergo sum
(that's latin, by the way, a dead language no-one uses anymore)

But it is still useful for scientists, archaeologists, historians, philosophers, . . . . . . people who use their minds. (hard jobs)


I also suppose that an argument could be made for getting rid of cursive because it is hard. It is not easy. It might damage the self-esteem of people who find it difficult to master.

And how would they get their trophy if it was hard to earn?



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by PutAQuarterIn
 


by funny you mean we will be able to read them hahah



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 07:56 AM
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PutAQuarterIn
While I agree we no longer need to use it, I think the next generation's signatures will look funny without it.


Next generation? As a teen I used to collect sports autographs, and had a huge collection. Thousands of different signatures. And of those thousands I could read almost every one of them (except some South American soccer teams), almost every one was legible enough to tell who the person was.

I've seen recent sport star autographs, and even college stars, and they are, for the vast majority now, all scribbles, circles, lines, and dots. They make no sense whatsoever as signatures. So the next generation, maybe they'll be afraid to hold a pen, not knowing what it is.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:18 AM
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I'm far more concerned that today's youth can't even do some basic math in their heads without resorting to technology. Whether it's figuring out a tip, or how much they'll pay for an item that is 30% off, it's just plain sad.

Idiocracy isn't just a comedy movie, it's become a documentary for the future.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 09:41 AM
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I still see it as an important tool, not only to know how to sign our names but as others have pointed out it is beneficial to read older documents. You do realize that some things are lost in translation right? Especially when a government will do anything it can to make people forget about our history, our forefathers (who wrote in cursive) and what they stood for.

Not to mention that cursive writing is good for the brain. It helps young minds develop while also aiding the aging mind in staying sharp. www.psychologytoday.com...

On occassion I write in cursive for no reason other than to not forget it.
edit on 17-3-2014 by brandiwine14 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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I've worked retail management for long enough on multiple levels, to see a broad range of IN school, and graduated of our youth.

From ones going to school to get advanced degrees, to those that will make a life time of retail.

Cursive has been long dead, and this is all late to the game, If I want to be understood I have to print clearly, cursive would get me a blank stare in anything I tried to communicate.

Thank god I took 4 years of drafting, otherwise I couldn't communicate in print with the generation of youth we are producing.

Most of the time I find myself Txting employees more than I ever thought I would, and at their preference.

You live in the world were in, not what it was, its just practical you have to adapt to the times.
edit on 17-3-2014 by benrl because: Irony



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 06:25 PM
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My 2nd grade daughter has been asking me to teach her cursive. I am in TN,and she isn't being introduced to it. What's odd is her penmanship is based on D'Nealian, which is a very curvy print, to make transition to cursive smoother. I was taught this form initially, but moved around a lot, so I was constantly chastised for my "sloppy" print. All of the school I attended, save for Kindergarten, did not use this style.
Personally, I would like to see my children learn cursive, but if not in school, I will teach them.



posted on Mar, 17 2014 @ 08:27 PM
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I'm not too worried about it - I was taught cursive starting with 1st grade, and somewhere around 2nd-3rd grade they made it optional; I can still remember my first D, because my cursive was not within the lines. In middle school, high school, and college cursive wasn't really required - those that knew how to do it were far & few.

The only thing I use it for now is my name/signature - It's one of the few bits I re-taught myself to do.

Reason why I don't see it too much of a problem is that about 95% of kids use a computer to turn in homework, so there's almost no need for it whatsoever. Where I worry is when those same kids forget to spell a common word (Their, There, and They're come to mind), and need to rely on a calculator to solve problems; I used to be like that, until I realized that I remember more when I write it down as opposed to typing it.

-fossilera




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