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China scientists: Crash into sea could have caused 'Seismic Event' on sea floor

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posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 08:36 AM
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www.nbcnews.com...





seis.ustc.edu.cn...

中科大检测到可能与马航飞机坠海相关的海底事件

www.scmp.com...

Chinese scientists observe 'seismic event' sea floor between Vietnam and Malaysia on March 8 which might be consistent with Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 crashing into the sea.


A slight tremor occurred on the sea floor at about 2.55am on March 8, some 150 kilometres off the southern tip of Vietnam.
t was a non-seismic zone, therefore judging from the time and location of the event, it might be related to the missing MH370 flight," said the statement.

The seismic event happened about 85 minutes after MH370 lost contact with air control, and about 116 km northeast of the spot where it was reportedly last heard from.

“If it was indeed an airplane crashing into the sea, the seismic wave strength indicated that the crash process was catastrophic," the statement said.


My first reaction to reading this headline was: seriously?!

But it does make sense, considering it's a non-seismic zone yet a seismic event was recorded like clockwork 1.5 hrs after contact was lost with air control.

This is a promising an insightful observance considering US is drawing a picture of a hijacked plane and a changed route towards the West.

Good work, Chinese!
edit on 16-3-2014 by gardener because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 08:52 AM
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reply to post by gardener
 




I laughed when I read this a few days ago..

What made me laugh is water slows a object down, this earthquake plane theory don;t make sense.
edit on 16/3/2014 by amraks because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 08:59 AM
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Morning,

Hoax Bin in 3...2...1...

-Peace-



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 09:12 AM
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Is it not possible for a ~550,000 lb 777 nose diving into the sea, to create any vibration thru the water at all?

Interesting how we are quick to dismiss a recorded seismic event, yet readily buy a mere claim as to which direction a plane may have been flown.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 09:48 AM
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Marine geologist Dave Long from the British Geological Survey told the BBC that the energy released by a plane hitting the ocean would be rapidly dissipated in the water.

He said any device picking up such small movements would have to be very sensitive and incredibly close to the impact, meaning that search teams would now know exactly where to look for the debris.


www.bbc.com...



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 09:49 AM
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Compare how much water weights to the seafloor compared to how much plane would weight. And because airplanes are aerodynamic (that applies to water too), it doesn't have much impact to sea surface. No tsunami or something.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 09:54 AM
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this is ridiculous...if anyone believes this, they need to go back to high school, or even grade school. the fact that this even came out of someone's mouth is astonishing.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 09:55 AM
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Thebel
And because airplanes are aerodynamic (that applies to water too), it doesn't have much impact to sea surface. No tsunami or something.


I agree that a crash would be insignificant.

But at this speed, a plane colliding with water is almost as destructive for the plane than colliding with a solid ground. I mean, the plane would have to be REALLY aerodynamic to produce no event, so here aerodynamics isn't really a factor for a 777 when we talk about a crash, it's basically a flying bus. The same applies for a meteorite colliding with Earth's atmosphere - air is not much, but its mere density is enough to heat and blow the rock into bits.

Sure, no tsunami, but I think it'll still have a slight impact on the sea surface.



edit on 16-3-2014 by swanne because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by gardener
 


Yes, and their aerial seismometers have detected bird landings throughout the pacific.
edit on 16-3-2014 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:07 AM
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Thebel
Compare how much water weights to the seafloor compared to how much plane would weight. And because airplanes are aerodynamic (that applies to water too), it doesn't have much impact to sea surface. No tsunami or something.


aerodynamics don't apply, the plane would be broken apart from the waters tension then slowed down by drag of the waters resistance.

think belly smack ouch...
edit on 16/3/2014 by amraks because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:12 AM
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greencmp
reply to post by gardener
 


Yes, and their aerial seismometers have counted bird landings throughout the pacific.
edit on 16-3-2014 by greencmp because: (no reason given)


Hahaha makes me wonder what they are teaching in schools these days.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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Have the depths of the ocean in this seismic area been released? That would tell us if this is even possible. A nose dive in say 60 foot of water from a 209 foot long plane could make quite an impact on the ocean floor. The planes shell itself wouldn't allow much of a splash down but the engines weight could have driven it down like a nail into wood.
Online it says the minimum empty weight of such a plane is close to 300,000 pounds. Add passengers, luggage, and fuel and I would say hell yeah its very possible for this to have created seismic activity on impact.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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Should be fairly simple to ask google about seismic activity on the ocean, you could probably very easily compare lists of random charts recorded and where. Basicaly to compare different events.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:24 AM
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That would have to be awful damn shallow water; extremely, explosively potent jet fuel; or a stretch of sea bed with the thickness of egg shell ... or all three ... Not buying it.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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are you kidding me?
the anti sub stuff they have on the seafloor can prolly hear a duck fart after it ate a french frie



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:38 AM
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Danbones
are you kidding me?
the anti sub stuff they have on the seafloor can prolly hear a duck fart after it ate a french frie


You are thinking of our SOSUS network which is microphones, this is referring to a seismic event.

Though, it brings up a valid question, why haven't we heard anything from SOSUS?

edit on 16-3-2014 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:41 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


You're talking about sonar not seismic. They're talking about the event being so massive at the surface that it translated through the water and into the rock beneath making the rocks, themselves, vibrate, a whole different scale of detection. While I think there are seismic sensors that can detect very minute vibrations (they can pick up the vibrations caused by noisy football and soccer stadiums), it would be quite a feet for a plane to strike the surface of very deep ocean water and have enough force of impact to be able to translate that vibration through a deep water column into the ocean floor underneath. Water tends to spread out the initial impact too much.

In order for there to be much chance, the water would have to be pretty shallow I think to lessen it's effects and let the plane's impact translate more directly straight to the sea floor itself.

Now, I think it would be very possible for something like sonar to have heard the impact if they were in range because water is an excellent conductor of sound, but seismic is different scale of detection.



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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If a plane were nose diving at high speed into the sea it would be ripped apart! At that speed water acts like a solid, and a plane is nothing more than a bake bean can with wings, it wouldn't even reach the sea bed.

This story is nonsense!



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 05:02 PM
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Somebody more mathematically inclined than myself can calculate the force of a 777 crashing to the surface of the ocean at 32'/sec/sec in lets say a flat spin type of crash and given the water temp, salinity, depth and density factors, provide a wave dynamics eval and tell us pretty close what the seismic affect would be on the seafloor. A variant chart can also be developed for different seafloor depths as well. I mean, a whale tail slap on the surface can be felt at great distances by other whales, so, surely, a plane crash would make a discernible thump as whale. (pun intended y'all!)



posted on Mar, 16 2014 @ 05:14 PM
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Seismic sensors in a non seismic zone. Humm I would have to say that's just a nice way to say they got a bit of important information from a perhaps top secret system






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